2018 Recipients: Top Scholarships and Fellowships

2018 Alfa Fellowships

2018 Astronaut Scholarship

  • Ben Fixman

    Ben is currently a Junior Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience student at Colorado State University. During his undergraduate studies, he has conducted research on Alzheimer's disease in the lab of Professor Emeritus, Dr. James Bamburg. His two-year tenure in the laboratory has resulted in the novel development of a hippocampal slice culture and imaging method.

    He plans to continue his neuroscience research throughout his undergraduate career and eventually complete an MD/PhD program. After receiving his degrees, he plans to work as a physician researcher, treating brain cancer patients and working in the lab to better understand the behavior of brain tumors.

    Ben's motivation to work with brain cancer patients grew after he was diagnosed with a benign brain tumor in the fall of 2016. Since tumor removal, Ben has been enjoying a healthy life.

    He loves to run, ski, play guitar, and spend time with family and friends. His favorite meal is strawberry banana pancakes, he is excited to catch up on sleep, and if you asked his roommates to describe him they would grumble about how he forgets to turn off the lights.

    Read more in SOURCE

2018 Critical Language Scholarships

  • Destiny Burnsworth

    Destiny Burnsworth is a senior double majoring in International Studies: Asia and Global Politics and Policy. As veteran and transfer student, she has a background in linguistics and a love for travel and adventure. Formerly working as an Indonesian Linguist, she realized her love for Asian history and culture, particularly Chinese culture and history. While studying Chinese at CSU, she realized she didn't just want to study history and language but wanted to be involved in US-Chinese relations and policy.

    After graduation, Destiny plans to either go to graduate school on the east coast particularly aspiring to participate in International Studies/ Foreign Service programs at Georgetown University or Johns Hopkins University or directly going into the workforce with the State Department working as a political analyst to foster stronger diplomatic ties between the United States and China.

  • Hannah Hurlbut

    Hannah is currently double-majoring in International Studies (concentration on Asian studies) and Communication Studies with a minor in Chinese. In addition to her major requirements, she is also taking Arabic language courses.

    Hannah enjoys having conversations with people from all different backgrounds and participates as Vice President of the Chinese Language Club, Secretary of the Council of International Student Affairs, and an English language partner for INTO students. She is a strong advocate of promoting diversity and bridging differences in this globalized but sometimes polarized society.

    After graduation, Hannah hopes to apply to the Youth Program of the United Nations and sees a future in translation or ambassadorship. She is so excited to return to her home country of China for the first time since adoption, and is thankful for all who have helped her reach this point.

  • Ashley Van Dyke

    Ashley VanDyke is a senior studying Chinese, Japanese, and International Studies at CSU. She also studied for a year at Kansai Gaidai University in Osaka, Japan and is looking forward to studying at the Dalian University of Technology in Dalian, China this summer. Her passions include learning languages and traveling. After graduation she plans to continue traveling and to continue expanding her foreign language abilities.

    She enjoys being active in both the Chinese and Japanese communities on campus and would like to give special acknowledgement to the Chinese and Japanese departments at CSU who have helped her improve her language skills, travel the world, and achieve her goals.

2018 DADD RISE Scholarships

  • Haley Dallas

    Haley Dallas is a Senior undergraduate student studying Environmental and Natural Resource Economics and Natural Resource Management. Throughout her time at CSU she has been involved in the leadership of a variety of student organizations including the CSU Zero Waste Team, the Society for Ecological Restoration, and the Department of Environmental Affairs for ASCSU.

    Prior to this opportunity, Haley conducted independent research on the water use of invasive shrub species in Stellenbosch, South Africa. She also received National Science Foundation funding to study ecosystem responses to anthropogenic disturbance with New Mexico State University at the Jornada Long-Term Ecological Research Station.

    When she's not studying for exams or working on her research, you can find Haley backpacking through Rocky Mountain National Park, backcountry skiing on Cameron Pass, climbing in the Poudre Canyon, or practicing yoga on the Oval.

    Through the DAAD RISE program, Haley will be assisting with research concerning the impacts of urban infrastructure on air pollution and climate change at Humboldt University in Berlin.

  • Allie Huber

    Allie Huber is a civil engineering student from Tucson, Arizona, who came to CSU for the amazing educational opportunity that it would bring. Since starting school at CSU, Allie embraced the differences between Colorado and Arizona and seized the chance to get involved. She is currently the technology chair of Engineers Without Borders as well as an active member of Alpha Phi Omega, the co-ed service fraternity on campus. She also works as the student coordinator for CSU's Finance and Real Estate Department.

    In addition to learning technical skills and engineering methods in the classroom, Allie was part of a group researching the portrayal of sustainability in civil and environmental engineering education. She also interned at Southwest Gas Corporation in Arizona, where she learned about the natural gas industry and how it interacts with other parts of a city's infrastructure.

    Upon hearing about the RISE internships in Germany, Allie was immediately interested. Much like beginning school in Colorado, the opportunity to learn from new people and experience a different culture drew her to the program. During the summer of 2018, Allie will be helping to analyze the structures of medieval basements in Cottbus and Luckau. She will apply concepts from school while promoting diversity and embracing other cultures in the workplace both during her summer abroad and in her future career.

2018 Freeman-Asia Award

  • Annalise Selfen

    I am a supply chain major earning a certificate in international business. I have always had a passion about learning other cultures and when I was in high school began studying Japanese, Chinese, and Korean Langauge.

    I decided to focus my studies on Korean lanagauge in University and went to South Korea for a full year in 2018 to solidify Korean lanagauge skill. I want to have a career in international business relations in Korea, China, and Japan through the skincare industry to promote better cultural relations.

2018 Fulbright Fellowships

  • Francis Commerçon

    Francis double-majored in Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology and Biological Sciences, with a minor in Chinese Language. He combined life-long passions for birds and Mandarin with an ongoing involvement in Yunnan Province, China.

    Since a semester abroad in 2015, he has returned to Yunnan to volunteer for a community-level experiment in sustainable rubber agroforestry and to research the human dimensions of ethnic minority farmers' interactions with the diverse wildlife of the area. At Colorado State University, Francis co-founded CSU Field Ornithologists, a very active student organization dedicated to sharing a passion for birding and an appreciation of avian ecology and conservation.

    Throughout college, actively volunteered and mentored other students for two community citizen science programs, and he led his student organization's recent journey to Trinidad and Tobago. Through working at the intersection of the social and natural sciences, and by taking a human-centered perspective to biodiversity conservation, Francis aspires to help communities develop harmonious interactions with their local ecosystems so future generations can enjoy clean air, reliable water, and abundant wildlife.

  • Octavius Jones

    "Pay it forward," is the phrase Octavius has heard many times as people have helped him move ahead and allowed him opportunities for advancement. Octavius continues to stand by that philosophy as he moves forward in life and continues to do community development and environmental conservation work.

    Octavius has over 4 years of international experience in Africa and utilized his educational background and creative arts to effectively run sustainable programs with the involvement of local communities. Octavius undergraduate studies in African Languages and Literature, as well as his science background, are vital in addressing the global issues we all face and were foundational for his completed thesis in the Ethnic Studies Master's degree program at Colorado State University. Octavius would like to continue his work in marine ecosystem conservation and cultural studies across the globe, with an emphasis on working with Indigenous populations and marginalized groups.

    During his Master's degree, Octavius began the development of a methodology of love as a hermeneutics of healing in Conservation as both a desire to center his own ethics in his research and as a lens that makes clear and transparent the hermeneutical ignorance inherent in the discipline of Conservation. In Octavius's methods he seek to elucidate what is already known within the Global South and amongst communities of oppressed people, that Western disciplines, such as Conservation, exact very particular epistemological and material violences upon Indigenous and local communities, women of color and other marginalized groups. A feminist epistemology can center methodologies of the oppressed that are capable and necessary for the dismantling of power and the liberation of oppressed people within the epistemology and research practices of Conservation. There is no hope for a future for the planet or humanity if there can be no transformation and healing between the Western epistemology of science and the epistemologies of Indigenous people and disenfranchised communities.

    Octavius previous examination and incorporation of transnational feminist methodologies and practices in his Master's thesis led him to engage knowledge systems understanding such as oral history and storytelling. The objective of Octavius's Fulbright qualitative research project in New Zealand, is to understand how Maori women in communities understand and implement sustainable use of marine resources. I would like to discuss their own Indigenous Ecological Knowledges (IEK) of marine ecosystems and their strategies and methods of passing these knowledges down to younger generations. Through stories and storytelling, Octavius will examine how Maori women understand their environment and what role they play in marine conservation in Wellington, New Zealand.

2018 Fulbright Summer Institute

  • Blake Jackson

    Blake Jackson is originally from Lakeside, CA where he was an active member in the agriculture community. He served a variety of leadership roles and had the opportunity to complete both livestock and crop projects.

    Currently, he is attending Colorado State University where he is majoring in Agriculture Economics with a minor in Applied Environmental Policy Analysis. He is a member of the Colorado Farm Bureau and the Honors Student Association.

    Blake hopes to continue his studies to focus on agriculture advocacy in water issues, potentially by continuing his education through law school and eventually practicing water law.

    This Summer, he has been selected to attend a 3-week Fulbright Summer Institute at Aberystwyth University in Wales. The Institute is dedicated to understanding identity and nationhood through the lens of Wales. He hopes to gain ambassadorial skills that bridges divides between polarized communities that he can take back to the United States and utilize in his career.

2018 Goldwater Honorable Mention

  • Ben Fixman

    Ben is currently a Junior Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience student at Colorado State University. During his undergraduate studies, he has conducted research on Alzheimer's disease in the lab of Professor Emeritus, Dr. James Bamburg. His two-year tenure in the laboratory has resulted in the novel development of a hippocampal slice culture and imaging method.

    He plans to continue his neuroscience research throughout his undergraduate career and eventually complete an MD/PhD program. After receiving his degrees, he plans to work as a physician researcher, treating brain cancer patients and working in the lab to better understand the behavior of brain tumors.

    Ben's motivation to work with brain cancer patients grew after he was diagnosed with a benign brain tumor in the fall of 2016. Since tumor removal, Ben has been enjoying a healthy life.

    He loves to run, ski, play guitar, and spend time with family and friends. His favorite meal is strawberry banana pancakes, he is excited to catch up on sleep, and if you asked his roommates to describe him they would grumble about how he forgets to turn off the lights.

2018 NIH Oxford-Cambridge Scholars

  • John Shannon

    John Shannon graduated from the Honors Program at CSU in 2016 with a degree in Biomedical Sciences. While at CSU, John worked with Dr. Claire Huang at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Fort Collins. His research focused on the study of candidate vaccines against dengue and West Nile viruses. He also performed research at CSU in the labs of Dr. Kelly Santangelo studying osteoarthritis, and Dr. Rushika Perera examining dengue virus pathogenesis.

    In addition, John spent a summer in the lab of Dr. James Crowe at the Vanderbilt Vaccine Center exploring respiratory syncytial virus infection. The following three summers he investigated antiviral immunity against influenza in humans in the lab of Dr. Paul Thomas at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. His work helped identify a novel genetic mutation that alters the immune response and puts certain individuals at a high risk of severe influenza infection.

    After graduation, John joined the labs of Dr. Jonathan Yewdell and Heather Hickman at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as a NIH Postbaccalaureate Fellow. His research focused on the development of an animal model to study poxvirus pathogenesis and antiviral immunity within the oral mucosa.

    As an NIH Oxford-Cambridge Scholar (OxCam) he plans to study the cutaneous immune response to mosquito borne viral infections. After finishing his OxCam graduate studies, he plans to attend medical school through the NIH MD/PhD partnership program. John's ultimate goal is to become a clinician-scientist, and pursue a career involving the clinical and basic science aspects of viral immunology.

  • Taylor Farley

    Taylor Farley, graduated with a degree in microbiology in 2015. She was inspired to pursue a research career while volunteering at a veterinary hospital in high school, where she quickly realized that she was more interested in conducting diagnostic tests than in being a veterinarian.

    Farley is now fascinated by the field of microbiome research and plans to use the scholarship to study various immune responses to the microbiome.

2018 NOAA HOLLINGS Scholarships

  • Louisa Markow

    I am a sophomore from Loveland, Colorado majoring in Wildlife Biology and minoring in Mathematics. I am a member of the University Honors program, serve as the secretary or SEEDS (Strategies for Ecological Education, Diversity, and Sustainability), and have experience as an undergraduate research assistant with Dr. Sasha Keyel's Auditory Sensitivity Project.

    I applied to the NOAA Hollings Scholarship because I want to work in an interdisciplinary environment where I can combine my passion for the environment and love of mathematics to help solve modern ecological problems.

    I am interested in applying various statistical and quantitative methods to conduct my own research on population modeling, ecosystem modeling, and spatial analysis, and explore how these areas are affected by various ecological disturbances. When I am not studying, I spend lots of time hiking, climbing, playing guitar, watching movies.

  • Jarod Snook

    Jarod is a sophomore majoring in Chemistry. Originally from Kansas City, Missouri. He is an undergraduate intern in Dr. June Medford's synthetic biology laboratory and a member of the University Honors program.

    The NOAA Hollings scholarship program appealed to Jarod's deep fascination with the ocean and a passion to protect the environment. His ultimate goal is to use the chemistry skills learned at CSU to conduct research and advocate for policy that will benefit the marine environment. This will likely involve monitoring human impacts and pollution, and determining the biochemical impacts these have on marine life such as coral reef ecosystems.

    When Jarod is not studying for Organic Chemistry exams, he enjoys snowboarding, hiking, and quoting famous movie lines.

2018 NSF-GRFP Fellowships

  • Kate Bates

    Kate Bates will graduate with a BS in Zoology and a minor in Mathematical Biology. She will then attend University of Massachusetts Amherst to pursue a PhD in Neuroscience and Behavior. While at CSU, she worked in Dr. Carol Seger's laboratory, was a TA for Domestic Animal Anatomy and Dissection and was lead tutor for chemistry at The Institute for Learning and Teaching (TILT).

    She has a demonstrated passion for promoting the retention of Women in STEM and has created a solution-oriented support group for female peer educators through TILT: Supporting the Empowerment of Women Educators (STEWE). She is also a firm believer that scientific advancements come from diversity of thought and wants to make an impact promoting the recruitment and retention of underrepresented populations in STEM, this passion includes designing and presenting a diversity and inclusion training to TILT peer educators.

    She wants to conduct research on evolutionary neurobiology and will start her work with sea slugs and rats. She hopes to go into academia to fulfill her passion for research and teaching.

  • Bridget Ecklund

    Bridget Eklund is in the second year of a PhD program in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, & Pathology here at CSU. She grew up in the small town of Scandia, Minnesota, and attended North Dakota State University (NDSU) for her undergrad. She graduated from NDSU in May of 2016 with a Bachelor's degree in Microbiology. Bridget then started here at CSU the following August. While at NDSU, she spent a lot of my time outside of class conducting research that focused on a variety of things including biofilms, cockroaches, shelf life of milled flax seed, and pathogens that pose a risk for bioterrorism.

    Here at CSU, her research now focuses on the gut microbiome, which is all the bacteria found in a person's gut. She is investigating how this microbial communities change during oral vaccination and the consumption of probiotics. She is co-advised by Dr. Zaid Abdo and Dr. Gregg Dean so she can conduct "wet lab" work in Dr. Dean's lab and learn how to use computational biology to analyze the big data sets that she gets back from my Next Generation Sequencing experiments. Aside from this research, Bridget is also a fellow this year for the NSF-sponsored GAUSSI group (Generating, Analyzing, and Understanding Sensory and Sequencing Information) here at CSU. She also coaches a Science Olympiad team at Fossil Ridge High School, where she teaches students about epidemiology and foodborne pathogens and outbreaks each week with another graduate student (Shaun Cross). She also helps design and teach modules for 5th graders to learn about complex STEM concepts, like DNA and phenotypes.

  • Jasmin Hicks

    Jasmin Hicks became the first college graduate in her family when she received her Bachelor's degree in Biology from Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts.

    This accomplishment instilled in Jasmin a passion to give back to underprivileged communities like her hometown. As a result, she has been involved in multiple science education and outreach programs such as Water for Cambodia, Children's Physical and Developmental Clinic, Brain Awareness Week and Expanding Your Horizons.

    Jasmin's involvement in undergraduate research made her want to attend graduate school so she could continue asking scientific questions. She is currently a PhD student in Biomedical Sciences where she works in Dr. Noreen Reist's laboratory. There, she studies the macromolecular structures that facilitate communication between neurons and muscles.

    After she completes her PhD, Jasmin hopes to use her love of science communication as the foundation to make knowledge more attainable for everyone, regardless of their background. In her free time, Jasmin enjoys participating in pottery classes, hiking, and spending time with her family and friends.

  • Christopher Kopack

    As a child, Christopher Kopack grew up with a great appreciation for the outdoors and the animals that inhabit them. He has always had a strong love of animal behavior and after starting college and transferring from Front Range Community College, he arrived at Colorado State University in 2011. It was at this time that Christopher began working with Dale Broder, a PhD student in Dr. Lisa Angeloni's lab, on behavioral plasticity in fishes. During this time, he proposed, designed and conducted his own research on training fish to better recognize predators and increasing antipredator behaviors. After publishing this work and graduating with his Bachelor of Science degree in Zoology, he went on to briefly work with Colorado Parks and Wildlife and as a research associate in the Angeloni lab until obtaining his own funding for graduate school.

    He is now a PhD student using much of the research he has conducted in an effort to advance animal behavior and evolutionary theory, as well as applying this work to help endangered and threatened species. After completing my degree, he hopes to move on to a post-doctoral position and eventually move into a faculty position at a university where he can mentor others, help them obtain careers in the sciences and help conserve the natural world that he loves so much. Christopher is very fortunate to be named a fellow of the National Science Foundation which would not have been possible without the support and encouragement from his mentors, the biology department and the agencies we have worked so closely with.

  • Kathryn Moore

    Kathryn Moore graduated from Colby College in 2014 with a BA in chemistry and minor in physics. I started conducting research in physical organic chemistry my sophomore year, combining theoretical and experimental chemistry to understand reaction mechanisms. During my junior and senior years I conducted research at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences with Drs. Steve Archer and Paty Matrai to understand the role of organic microlayers at the air-sea interface in mediating ozone deposition to the sea surface. Following graduation, I accepted a position at UCSD/SIO in Prof. Kim Prather's CAICE (NSF CCI) center, and conducted lab, mesocosm, and field studies to understand sea spray aerosol (SSA) production and climate properties. I then moved to the UK for a year, to work as a lab technician in Prof. Andrea Burke and Dr. James Rae's lab at the University of St. Andrews. There I used sulfate aerosols from Greenland ice cores to constrain the volcanic forcing of climate over the last few thousand years using geochemical techniques. During all of these very different research experiences, one of my favorite components has been mentoring high school and undergraduate students, both in the lab and outside.

    In Fall 2017 I started my MS/PhD at CSU in the Department of Atmospheric Science. My MS research focuses on atmospheric ice nucleation in remote marine environments, with the goal of improving the accuracy of climate models through an increased understanding of ice nucleating particle production and cloud microphysical processes, particularly over the Southern Ocean.

  • Kate O'Dell

    Kate O'Dell is a second year masters student in the Department of Atmospheric Science working with Dr.s Jeff Pierce and Emily Fischer studying particle pollution from wildfires in the western U.S. She graduated from the College of Charleston in 2016 with a B.S. in physics and minors in math and environmental studies. As an undergraduate, She spent three years working as an undergraduate research assistant studying the impact of statistical sampling variability on precipitation measurements.

    She chose to come to CSU for graduate school because of the great atmospheric science program here and all the outdoor activities Colorado has to offer. She is on the CSU climbing team and a member of the CSU chapter of the American Association for Aerosol Research. After defending my masters this fall, she intends to stay at CSU for her PhD (also in atmospheric science) where she hopes to continue studying on the impact of wildfires on U.S. air quality and public health.

  • Kathleen Wendt

    Kathleen E. Wendt is a graduating Honors undergraduate in Human Development and Family Studies. In August 2018, Kathleen will begin the CSU Prevention Science (M.S.) and Applied Developmental Science (Ph.D.) programs, continuing under the tutelage of Dr. J. Douglas Coatsworth.

    Her research program incorporates family risk and resilience, mindfulness in parenting, and parent-child co-regulation from a dynamic systems perspective; her specific research interests are twofold: 1) how family dynamics impact developmental trajectories and the strengthening of resilient qualities and 2) how mindfulness-based interventions can positively impact families, particularly those with histories of stress, risk, and trauma.

    Kathleen has worked with children and youth who have experienced trauma through the Child Trauma and Resilience Assessment Center; foster, adoptive and kinship families through Kids at Heart; and dying and bereaved individuals through Pathways Hospice and Palliative Care. Kathleen is a Community Associate in the Center for Public Deliberation and has been an exchange student mentor for the Office of International Programs.

2018 Truman Finalists

  • Clint Fallon

    Clint Fallon is a first-generation student majoring in Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at Colorado State University. Prior to attending CSU, Clint enlisted into the Army and served time in Afghanistan.

    While on campus, Clint is actively involved with the Strategies for Ecology Education, Diversity, and Sustainability (SEEDS) student organization participating in citizen science and outreach projects.

    He is interested in studying amphibian diseases and how anthropogenic effects are exasperating outbreaks. Upon graduation Clint would like to pursue a graduate degree in wildlife and fisheries science.

  • Coral Isaacs

    Coral is a third-generation Alaskan and first-generation student studying environmental health with a minor in biomedical engineering at Colorado State University. From a young age Coral witnessed the unique effects that the environment had on human health in Alaska which encouraged her to pursue a degree that allowed her to use her problem-solving skills to help others in her home state.

    After a summer working on the North Slope aiding in remediation efforts, she knew that her efforts needed to be applied toward health education in rural communities of Alaska. On campus, she works as a research assistant in an industrial hygiene lab and is in the process of writing a manuscript outlining her research on the inflammatory response of bronchial epithelial cells caused by bioaerosols.

    She plans to pursue a Master of Public Health along with a Master of Clinical Health Services in order to work as both a public health educator and a physician assistant. It is with these positions that she plans to make changes to the health education and quality of life of Alaskans on both the large and small scale.

  • Sage Mijares

    Growing up in rural Colorado and New Mexico, Sage's interests in food production and public health were shaped by her involvement with agriculture, 4-H, and the ranching community. Having witnessed firsthand the challenges associated with remote agricultural communities, advocacy for rural populations has become a lifelong passion.

    Sage is a Monfort Scholar with a strong background in leadership, culturally sensitive education, and service. She recently spent three months in northern Mexico volunteering with orphaned youth in a summer program focused on food production, safe handling of animals, and public health.

    Additionally, she has conducted research related to antimicrobial resistance in animal products and the efficacy of bacterial sampling methods on beef carcasses. In the future, Sage aims to give back to rural communities like the ones she grew up in by becoming a public-health veterinarian.

  • Catrin Sunstone

    Cat Sunstone is a NOAA Hollings Scholar, Truman Scholarship Finalist, and a Udall Scholarship Honorable Mention. She is passionate about natural resources, social justice, and how the two intersect. Cat attends Colorado State University (CSU) and is majoring in Human Dimensions of Natural Resources.

    Prior to arriving in Colorado, she lived her entire life near the Pacific Ocean and feels a deep desire to protect our coastal and marine resources. As such, she is a founding officer of the CSU chapter of the Inland Oceans Coalition where she works to bring awareness of marine issues to her landlocked community.

    Cat is the first undergraduate student representative invited to join the Diversity and Inclusion Committee in her major's department. She is also active in the CSU Center for Public Deliberation, where she facilitates community dialogue around wicked problems such as climate change and immigration.

    As a NOAA Hollings Scholar, she is an intern this summer at NOAA, where she will research deep-sea coral protected areas and learn about marine policy. She plans to pursue a graduate degree in environmental policy and work to bridge the needs of science, community, and governance with a focus on marine issues.

2018 Udall Scholar

  • Nogah Seidemann

    Nogah is studying Apparel Design with a minor in Environmental Affairs at Colorado State University. She is driven to change the unsustainable nature of fast fashion through creative design, zero-waste techniques and a focus on craftsmanship. She is also passionate about educating consumers on the production and impact of their clothing.

    On campus, she has worked for the student government as Deputy Director for Environmental Affairs and as Eco-leader in the residence halls, positions focused on engaging the student community in environmentally conscious behavior. Additionally, she is one of the founders of the campus Zero Waste Team, a student group focusing on active waste reduction and compost access on campus.

    When she isn't sorting trash, Nogah enjoys the arts community around Fort Collins or jamming out to a musical soundtrack.

2018 Udall Honorable Mentions

  • Tamera Breidenbach

    Tamera Breidenbach is an Ecosystem Science and Sustainability major, with a minor in Sustainable Water. Her passions and interests include water law and policy, and social and environmental justice. She is a member and Historian for the Warner College Council, a Senator for Warner College of Natural Resources in ASCSU, an inductee of Xi Sigma Pi, and a student hourly in the Global Soil Biodiversity Initiative. She is also an ESS S-STEM Fellowship recipient for Warner College of Natural Resouces.

    Tamera grew up in the foothills of North Carolina, in the heart of the American South. She grew up close to "the outdoors" and developed an affinity for nature, hiking, fishing, and camping at a young age. After backpacking in various national parks, she came back to school as an adult learner because she was motivated to create change in the environmental discussion at the governmental level. She spends time volunteering in the community and working to gain knowledge that will prepare her for a future in resource management and policy.

    After working on a year-long undergraduate project, Tamera will be traveling to Peru. She hopes to gain not only field experience and learning in a research environment but she also hopes to learn from being in a developing country. She hopes that the experience she will gain will offer her a different perspective and enable her to learn more about diversity and social justice issues.

  • Raven Pinto

    Raven Pinto is from Twin Lakes, New Mexico and a member of the Navajo Nation. A Politcal Science major and Legal Studies minor, she strives to build safe, sustainable communities and improve infrastructure on Native American reservations.

    She volunteers as a counselor at Camp Dunamis, a summer camp focused on racial reconciliation, serves as a Diversity Senator for the Native American Cultural Center, and conducts research on traditional food systems.

  • Catrin Sunstone

    Cat Sunstone is a NOAA Hollings Scholar, Truman Scholarship Finalist, and a Udall Scholarship Honorable Mention. She is passionate about natural resources, social justice, and how the two intersect. Cat attends Colorado State University (CSU) and is majoring in Human Dimensions of Natural Resources.

    Prior to arriving in Colorado, she lived her entire life near the Pacific Ocean and feels a deep desire to protect our coastal and marine resources. As such, she is a founding officer of the CSU chapter of the Inland Oceans Coalition where she works to bring awareness of marine issues to her landlocked community.

    Cat is the first undergraduate student representative invited to join the Diversity and Inclusion Committee in her major's department. She is also active in the CSU Center for Public Deliberation, where she facilitates community dialogue around wicked problems such as climate change and immigration.

    As a NOAA Hollings Scholar, she is an intern this summer at NOAA, where she will research deep-sea coral protected areas and learn about marine policy. She plans to pursue a graduate degree in environmental policy and work to bridge the needs of science, community, and governance with a focus on marine issues.