2020 Recipients: Top Scholarships and Fellowships

2020 Astronaut Scholars

  • Jessica Roberts

    Jessica Roberts is a sophomore currently pursuing a neuroscience major with a minor in Spanish. She works in Dr. Seonil Kim’s research laboratory in the Department of Biomedical Sciences investigating hyperexcitation, or the overstimulation of neural networks, in Alzheimer’s disease. Through this experience, Jessica has become interested in pursuing a career as a research scientist as she enjoys the creative nature of scientific investigation.

    In her future career, she hopes to focus on the study of neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, Jessica is involved with mentoring and tutoring through the Neuroscience Student Organization and she would like to continue assisting students throughout her career. In her free time, Jessica enjoys running and rock climbing with her friends.

  • Raegan Petch

    Raegan is a junior at CSU and plans to graduate in 2021. She is a microbiology major and is working on a minor in Spanish with a concentration in Spanish for animal health care. After graduation, Raegan intends to pursue a joint PhD/DVM program, and she plans to focus on research on zoonotic diseases.

    Before attending CSU, Raegan hoped to be a clinical veterinarian due to her love of animals. However, through her years of work in Dr. VandeWoude’s lab, she discovered a passion for research and has now decided to dedicate the majority of her time to studying infectious diseases.

    Aside from school and research, Raegan loves hiking, playing disc golf, and enjoying all of the beautiful sights that Colorado has to offer. She also plays the trumpet and the piano, and she likes to draw and paint. Aside from that, Raegan can often be found working with rescue dogs to get her daily quota of interactions with animals.

2020 Boren Scholarship

  • Caroline Dunphy

    Caroline grew up in Fort Collins, enjoying both the mountains and the foothills with her family. She began riding horses at a young age, and as she grew older she was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to work with mustangs. Learning about the issues these horses face, as well as being exposed to media about climate change for so long, fostered Caroline’s desire to aid in the protection of our natural world.

    In school, she became fascinated with foreign languages and attended Japanese classes at CSU while still enrolled in high school. This experience not only introduced Caroline to the language, but also CSU’s campus atmosphere and influenced her decision to attend CSU as an undergraduate.

    Now, she is an Anthropology and International Studies double major, minoring in Japanese. She has hoped to study abroad in Japan ever since she began taking classes in the language, and she is grateful to those who supported her and helped make her aspirations possible.

  • Sydney Spiegel

    Sydney Spiegel is a junior majoring in mechanical engineering and minoring in Chinese language. After working in numerous fields ranging from carpentry to emergency medicine he decided his true passions involved creating machines and collaborating with people from around the world.

    Before attending college, he traveled and lived in Europe, Africa, South and Central America. While abroad he realized that being able to speak foreign languages was critical to understanding and working with cultures outside the U.S.

    As a non-traditional transfer student, he is excited and eager to pursue all the opportunities available to him. Of those opportunities, choosing to study Mandarin was an easy choice because it would allow him to communicate with the most people and be involved in the cutting edge of technology.

    After graduation, Sydney plans to further his language skills with the assistance of a Fulbright Scholarship, or go directly into the workforce within an international engineering company. He aspires to work within the global community to solve complicated problems by improving communication between international teams.

2020 Critical Language Scholarships

  • Thany Dykson

    Thany Dykson is a junior in the Warner College of Natural Resources, studying Fish, Wildlife, & Conservation Biology. She is minoring in Spanish, as well as Global & Environmental Sustainability and hopes to pursue a career in community-based conservation internationally. She loves traveling and learning about local conservation efforts everywhere she goes. She possesses a love for languages and is fluent in Spanish. She has studied abroad in Indonesia and Mexico and looks forward to the opportunity to return to Indonesia with CLS. When she isn’t abroad or in class, Thany loves to spend her time playing guitar, hiking, playing soccer, and salsa dancing. She is involved as an Honors Ambassador on campus, and as a student research assistant.

    Through her educational experiences abroad, she realized how important it is to enable communication between scientists and conservationists globally and hopes to be a part of this by pursuing further studies in Bahasa Indonesia. Studying this language allows her to look towards careers in non-profit organizations as well as the federal government. After graduation, Thany plans on pursuing a PhD and continuing to apply the tools of research and communication to conservation issues around the world

  • Natalie Montecino

    Natalie is a sophomore majoring in International Studies and minoring in Japanese, French, and Global Politics. After briefly studying abroad in Hiroshima for a summer during 2016, she realized she was truly passionate about cultural awareness and language learning, so much so that she wanted to pursue a major dedicated to such concepts!

    In spring 2020, she studied abroad in Osaka where she further developed her Japanese language skills and love for language and culture. She is excited to continue to learn about the beautiful country that is Japan even more this summer and hopes to pursue a career in language preservation.

2020 Fulbright Fellowships

  • David Atkins

    David (Dave) is a Master's student in the Forest & Rangeland Stewardship department at CSU. His research here is based on the application of mechanistic modeling and ecology to address novel forest pathogens. Before coming to CSU, Dave earned a B.S. in Biology with an ecology emphasis from Eastern Connecticut State University.

    His previous research involved examining legacy effects of agricultural land-use on a keystone pine species in the southeastern U.S. savannas. He subsequently completed an NSF-sponsored research internship at Syracuse University focused on the impacts from 25 years of simulated climate on the growth phenology and carbon-allocation strategy of a cosmopolitan herbaceous plant. Together, these experiences helped him to focus my research objectives towards understanding how plant communities will be affected by anthropogenic disturbances during a period of rapidly changing climate conditions.

    Dave have always had a desire to increase international collaboration among international scientific entities. The forest disease we are studying (pine wilt disease) is one of the greatest threats to conifer forests worldwide, and many interdisciplinary research efforts are aimed at curbing the impacts of this disease. The Fulbright Scholarship will allow him to conduct research to compare disease epidemiology and impacts found in the arid alpine regions of Colorado and Mediterranean climate of Portugal. By examining how differences in climate affect disease progression, Dave hopes to develop models that will be used by managers around the world to help influence policy decisions. This project will also increase natural resource education opportunities in STEM fields for children in urban areas through an outreach and engagement partnership with a research institution in Lisbon, Portugal.

  • Hannah Hurlbut

    Hannah Hurlbut received a Fulbright grant to attend National Cheng Chi University (NCCU) in Taiwan to receive a Master’s in International Communications. In May 2020, she will graduate with two degrees from: a BA in International Studies (concentration Asian Studies) and a BA in Communication Studies. She will graduate with Magna Cum Laude recognition. She also has a minor in Chinese, and takes Arabic language courses in addition to this. She is a member of the Honors Program and will have completed a Thesis involving interviewing 10 Chinese international students and 10 domestic students as a cross-comparison on feminism through podcasts. Hannah is also a Critical Language Scholarship alum, a nationally competitive, state-funded scholarship recipient through which she studied abroad in China for the summer.

    Hannah is a strong proponent of cross-cultural communication and her fondest memories in college have been the organizations she has been a part of and the people she has met through them. From freshman year she expressed a deep interest for cultural exchange as a part of Global Village, a key community at CSU where domestic students room with international students. Her friendship with her roommate from Indonesia is as strong in her senior year as when they first met.

    When she has free time, Hannah enjoys photography or listening to music, and she is currently hand-sewing reusable cotton face-masks to donate to medical staff during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Joanna Luna

    Joanna Luna received a Fulbright grant as an English Teaching Assistant in Galicia, Spain. She is originally from San Jose, CA. She is a first-generation Latina student who graduated from CSU Spring 2019 with two degrees: BS in Social Work and BS in Human Development and Family Studies (concentration in Prevention & Intervention Science) with a minor in Spanish.

    For her first two years of undergrad, she participated in Key Communities - a highly diverse first- and second-year learning community program designed to support first-year students with the transition to Colorado State University. She became a Key mentor for incoming students in her third year and mentored students in the Triunfo Mentoring Program (peer mentoring program for underprivileged Latino elementary students). She volunteered and worked with Rams Kidz Village for three and a half years, an on-campus childcare facility for student parents at Colorado State University. She also assisted in conducting research for the Health, Emotion, and Aging Research Team for two semesters. She participated in two Alternative Spring Break trips with the SLiCE Office. She attended the Pinnacle Conference in Orlando, FL, an association for non-traditional students in higher education. Joanna has been recognized by the University as “2019 Outstanding Human Development and Family Studies Grad” and was also recognized at the 28th Annual Latina History Day Conference in California as the 2019 Latina to Watch

    As an aspiring social worker, she values new opportunities to continue to learn and develop both professionally and personally. It will be her first time going to another country without her family. She is very close to her family and they are her motivation. Upon her return to the U.S., she plans to pursue her master’s degree in Social Work. She has worked with a wide range of populations from toddlers to older adults from different contexts involving trauma-informed care, health, research, camp counseling, and mentorship. She is interested in working with children, youth, and families to improve their emotional development, stress management, and coping mechanisms. Research shows that communities have a limited number of qualified bilingual and bi- cultural social workers who can serve individuals who come from underrepresented backgrounds and are impacted by trauma, mental health, or disability.

2020 Fulbright Summer Institute Scholar

  • Benjamin Randall

    Benjamin Randall is originally from Omaha, NE, where he developed early roots within endurance sports, music, and storytelling mediums. Some of his favorite pastimes include going for long runs or bike rides, baking loaves of sourdough bread, and making fun skits and videos with friends and family.

    Ben is a diverse media personality who is an active contributor to student journalism in the greater-Omaha area; testifying at the State Capitol for student journalism rights, maintaining an athletic influencer and sports nutrition sponsor account on Instagram, and participating in transmedia storytelling through his podcast, More About More.

    Now, Ben combines his multi-faceted backgrounds at Colorado State University, where he is majoring in Journalism & Media Communication with a Public Relations focus, and minoring in Interdisciplinary Leadership Studies. He is a proud member of the President's Leadership Program, and brings this emphasis of transformational leadership across campus--where he is involved in leadership roles within the CSU Triathlon team and the Society of Professional Journalists.

    Ben aims to combine his athletic pursuits with his journalistic endeavors into one, niche platform, where he can advertise as a professional athlete for endurance athletics and nutrition companies. His studies within media relations and social media management will fuel his quest as an adventurous storyteller.

    Due to the ongoing pandemic of COVID-19, his acceptance as a Fulbright Summer Institute Scholar has been deferred to the summer of 2021. Regardless, Ben has been selected to attend a 4-week Fulbright Summer Institute at Queen's University Belfast in Northern Ireland. His time spent in Ireland will encumber studies within historical perspectives in media, rich storytelling backgrounds, and how the state of journalism yesterday will shape the future writing of tomorrow. He hopes to gain friends and relationships, skills relevant to his career, and memories to last a lifetime in his venture to Ireland.

2020 Goldwater Scholars

  • Jessica Roberts

    Jessica Roberts is a sophomore currently pursuing a neuroscience major with a minor in Spanish. She works in Dr. Seonil Kim’s research laboratory in the Department of Biomedical Sciences investigating hyperexcitation, or the overstimulation of neural networks, in Alzheimer’s disease. Through this experience, Jessica has become interested in pursuing a career as a research scientist as she enjoys the creative nature of scientific investigation.

    In her future career, she hopes to focus on the study of neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, Jessica is involved with mentoring and tutoring through the Neuroscience Student Organization and she would like to continue assisting students throughout her career. In her free time, Jessica enjoys running and rock climbing with her friends.

  • Raegan Petch

    Raegan is a junior at CSU and plans to graduate in 2021. She is a microbiology major and is working on a minor in Spanish with a concentration in Spanish for animal health care. After graduation, Raegan intends to pursue a joint PhD/DVM program, and she plans to focus on research on zoonotic diseases.

    Before attending CSU, Raegan hoped to be a clinical veterinarian due to her love of animals. However, through her years of work in Dr. VandeWoude’s lab, she discovered a passion for research and has now decided to dedicate the majority of her time to studying infectious diseases.

    Aside from school and research, Raegan loves hiking, playing disc golf, and enjoying all of the beautiful sights that Colorado has to offer. She also plays the trumpet and the piano, and she likes to draw and paint. Aside from that, Raegan can often be found working with rescue dogs to get her daily quota of interactions with animals.

2020 NOAA Hollings Scholar

  • Izabella Mastroianni

    Izabella is a second-year honors student majoring in Biochemistry with an ASBMB Concentration and minoring in Spanish. She currently works in Dr. Erin Nishimura’s lab in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology department at CSU assisting a PhD candidate, Robert Williams, studying the mechanisms and gene regulation of intestinal development in C. elegans.

    Pursuing a career related to genetics has been a goal of hers since her sophomore year of high school because she is fascinated by learning about how development occurs at the molecular and genetic levels. Izabella has been working in research labs since her senior year of high school, and has interned at the US Bureau of Reclamation for three years in two laboratories: the Reclamation Detection Laboratory for Exotic Species and the Materials and Corrosion Laboratory’s Protective Coatings group. Izabella is very excited for the summer internship at NOAA that comes with the NOAA Hollings Scholarship during 2021 and hopes to work in a genetics laboratory through the Oceanic and Atmospheric Research division.

    Outside of the lab, Izabella volunteers with her co-ed fraternity, Alpha Phi Omega, and served as one of the Co-Fundraising chairs on the Executive Board for the 2019-20 school year and will be the Leadership Development chair for the 2020-21 school year. She has also fostered her passion for social justice by participating in Campus Step Up, Alternative Spring Breaks, and the LeaderShape Institute through the SLiCE office at CSU and wants to incorporate what she has learned into her future career, whatever that may be. She also enjoys playing and watching soccer, reading, creating art, and baking.

2020 NSF-GRFP Fellowships

  • Amanda Schick

    Amanda was born in Ohio and spent her high school time in Japan before moving to Colorado for college. She received her undergraduate degree in Chemical and Biological Engineering from CSU and will be starting her PhD at the University of Florida in the fall. She will be working with Dr. Amor Menezes in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, studying coagulation from a control’s perspective.

    Outside of school, Amanda enjoys hiking, running, backpacking, skiing, and baking. She has a passion for healthcare, and her goal is to eventually work on designing and/or building medical devices to improve current healthcare.

  • Arielle Hay

    Arielle Hay just completed her second year as a PhD student in the Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology program. She is working in the labs of Dr. Julie Moreno and Dr. Mark Zabel to develop a stem cell therapy for prion disease.

    She completed her undergraduate degree in neuroscience and biology at Carthage College. After graduating from Carthage, she worked for a year at the National Institute of Health Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana where she studied Zika virus.

    She hopes to return there after she graduates from CSU to continue studying prion diseases. In her free time she enjoys hiking with her dog, backpacking, skiing, weight lifting and eating.

  • Bradly Burke

    Bradly is a third year PhD student in the Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology Department at Colorado State University. He is a member of Dr. Tony Schountz’s laboratory and is co-mentored by Dr. Marcela Henao-Tamayo.

    In Dr. Schountz’s laboratory they have a unique resource of a breeding colony of Jamaican fruit bats, Artibeus jamaicensis, to utilize as a model organism. Bats are reservoirs for several viruses, including henipaviruses, filoviruses, coronaviruses, lyssaviruses and the unusual bat influenza A-like viruses, H17N10 and H18N11.

    His thesis project will focus on characterizing the cellular immune system of Jamaican fruit bats using flow cytometry. Elucidating the immune system and immune responses of bats will help us understand how bats are capable to be reservoirs of these viruses without the high mortality and morbidity observed when humans and other mammals contract these diseases.

    The study of bat immune systems could help identify potential targets for modulation of human immune responses towards a more favorable patient outcome when infected with bat-borne zoonotic diseases.

  • Grace Johnson

    Grace Johnston graduated from Colorado State University in Spring 2020 with a B.S. in Biological Sciences. During her time at CSU, she worked as an undergraduate researcher in Dr. Cris Argueso’s lab. This opportunity, along with the uplifting community that is the Department of Agricultural Biology, solidified her aspirations to continue working in the realm of plant biology.

    While staying under the mentorship of Dr. Argueso, Grace will be pursuing a master’s degree in Bioagricultural Sciences with a specialization in Plant Pathology. Her graduate work will focus on elucidating hormonal crosstalk in relation to growth and defense against pathogens using the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Even though she is in the beginning stages of her scientific career, she hopes this research will greatly impact the larger agricultural community. By furthering investigations of the complex network of interactions regulating the balance between plant growth and immunity, future efforts in synthetic biology can be used to develop advanced crops with increased pathogen resistance and superior plant yield.

    Without question, Grace is sincerely honored to be awarded the NSF GRFP.

  • Ian Moseley

    Ian began studying chemistry as an undergraduate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Although he was enrolled as a pre-med student, he fell in love with chemistry and changed his major at the beginning of his sophomore year. As an undergraduate he worked as a researcher in an inorganic chemistry lab studying renewable energy technologies.

    After graduating in 2018 Ian went on to pursue his PhD here at CSU working for Professor Joseph Zadrozny. His work at CSU has focused on the characterization of small magnetic molecules and the development of new synthetic techniques for the creation of new magnetic molecules and materials.

    Developing new materials using earth abundant metals like iron, which behave more like the rare-earth metals found in modern electronics, would have profound impacts on both chemical research and the environment. For these reasons, he has decided to pursue these research efforts as the focus of his NSF fellowship.

  • Kirsten Hein

    Kirsten is a first-year PhD student in the Graduate Degree Program in Ecology (GDPE) advised by Dr. John McKay. Her research will focus on investigating the molecular mechanisms that control complex root traits in maize to understand drought adaptation in agricultural systems.

    Kirsten holds a B.S. in Biology from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. As an undergraduate student, her research experience involved a breeding and greenhouse study to identify new sources of Phytophthora cinnamomi-resistant germplasm for introgression into populations of Cryphonectria parasitica-resistant chestnut trees.

    Through an international research experience for undergraduates in Cádiz, Spain, she studied the eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean flatfish, Solea senegalensis, and chromosome organization to characterize genes involved in sexual determination and differentiation.

    During her PhD, she looks forward to continuing the mentoring of undergraduate students and to increasing their exposure to research opportunities.

  • Lily Durkee

    Lily is currently a second-year MS student in the Graduate Degree program in Ecology and the Department of Agricultural Biology advised by Dr. Ruth Hufbauer. In her research, she uses the red flour beetle (Tribolium casteneum) to study the rapid evolution of populations that are exposed to environmental stress.

    Her work aims to find dispersal strategies (e.g. migration events from adjacent, thriving populations) that best delay extinction and facilitate adaptation, allowing the populations to recover. Her work has implications in the conservation of small populations, and also in pest management, where preventing population growth is the main goal.

    Lily received her BS in Biology from the University of Maryland, College Park, which is where she discovered her love of insects. She worked closely with Dr. Daniel Gruner’s lab during her four years there, which culminated with an honors thesis project that investigated the invertebrate community of an urban wetland. It was through this work that she decided to attend graduate school to be able to continue studying the questions that lie at the intersection of insects, ecology, and evolution.

    Outside of the lab, Lily loves exploring the beautiful outdoor spaces in and around Fort Collins. She enjoys whitewater kayaking, rock climbing, mountain biking, skiing, and hiking, and hopes to continue learning and adventuring here after defending her MS in Summer 2021. She will then begin a PhD through the same program at CSU.

2020 PPIA JSI Fellowship

  • America Rios

    America Rios is an Honors scholar in her last year as an undergraduate student at CSU majoring in Economics, International studies, and Spanish. After completing the Public Policy and International Affairs Fellowship through Princeton University during the Summer of 2020, she reinforced her passion for public policy. After graduation, America intends to pursue a Masters of Public Policy with a focus on social policy analysis on issues such as immigration, poverty, affordable housing, and access to healthcare and education.

    America has contributed to the CSU community through various work and volunteer opportunities the past three years. She tutors first generation students at the Academic Advancement Center and is a Cultural Mentor for incoming international students. America is also an active member of various clubs on campus including the Economics Leadership Council, Las Comadres, and the Economics Honor Society Omicron Delta Epsilon. Currently, America is working on her Honors thesis which is looking at finding solutions to the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on the Hispanic/Latino community.

2020 Truman Scholars

  • Sarah Greichen

    Sarah Greichen is the founder, board chair, and CEO of Score A Friend. The Denver, Colorado native founded the organization to help her twin brother, who has an autism spectrum disorder, find a friend.

    Greichen was awarded the National Young Woman of Distinction Award by Girl Scouts of the USA and the 2016 Outstanding Youth Award for National Philanthropy Day in Colorado. She was a speaker at the 2019 PEAK Parent Center National Conference on Inclusive Education and the 2018 Colorado Social and Emotional Learning Forum. Greichen is featured in the Pass It On campaign alongside rock band NEEDTOBREATHE representing the value of inclusion.

    She is a junior at Colorado State University majoring in Corporate Finance, Investment Analysis, and Marketing with a minor in entrepreneurship. She is the Co-Marketing and Co-Business Day Chair on the CSU College of Business Dean’s Student Leadership Council, an Ambassador for the Entrepreneurship Institute, and is an honors student.

    She received 1st place in the national Startup Summer Pitch Competition and 1st place in the OtterBox Ethics Challenge. Sarah is an aspiring public policy attorney and social entrepreneur with a life-long passion of making the world a more inclusive place for people of all abilities.

  • Brianne Lauro

    Brianne Lauro is a first-generation college student. She is a junior majoring in Human Dimensions of Natural Resources at Colorado State University. Brianne is originally from the Island of Hawai'i where she learned how to hunt, fish, and spear dive from her father. She credits these experiences as being of the most influential to her life.

    After graduate school, Brianne plans to return home. She is eager to address the lack of Native and local representation in leadership within the State of Hawai'i, specifically in land and natural resource management. As she wrote in her scholarship essay: “Without the incorporation of Indigenous values that encompass a history and culture deeply connected to land and natural resources, Hawai'i’s resource managers will continue to fail to meet the needs specific to the Islands’ people and communities.” Brianne affirms that, though there are many avenues to accomplish this, her own is through policy.

    When asked the "why" behind her chosen career path, she stated: “It is my duty to ensure that the culture, the livelihood, and the well-being of Hawai'i’s people is preserved.”

    Currently, Brianne works as a Research Assistant for Dr. Dominique David-Chavez on a National Science Foundation (NSF) study. In the NSF study, they are working to develop a code of ethics for federally-funded environmental research projects that work on/in Indigenous lands and/or communities. Brianne is also working as a Congressional Intern for the District Office of U.S. Congressman Joe Neguse.

2020 Truman Finalist

  • Ilana Vargas

    Ilana studies Ecosystem Science and Sustainability. Her career focus is to address issues of climate inequity among indigenous communities and other marginalized populations. While abroad in Panama, Ilana studied Sustainable Indigenous Tourism as part of the international grassroots network of Mission Blue Hope Spots.

    She also received the Colorado-Wyoming Alliance for Minority Participation grant for Summer Research Initiatives to conduct independent research in Todos Santos, Baja California Sur, Mexico. She spent a summer investigating forest-atmosphere carbon exchanges as a part of large-scale climate modeling project at Harvard Forest.

    As a dual citizen of the United States and Mexico, Ilana has spent time growing up in Mexico where she observed coastal communities struggling to adapt to rapid tourism development and environmental degradation. This experience inspires her to work with other communities facing similar problems.

    On Campus, Ilana works for the Colorado Natural Heritage Program, is a member of both the Earth Science Women’s Network, and Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences. She served as Campus Ambassador for the Outdoor Foundation and the National Park Service in effort to increase student involvement in environmental stewardship and sustainability.

    By combining ecological research with public service Ilana hopes to empower communities to increase their resilience in the face of climate change and engage in sustainable policy and environmental practices.

2020 Udall Scholar

  • Brianne Lauro

    Brianne Lauro is a first-generation college student. She is a junior majoring in Human Dimensions of Natural Resources at Colorado State University. Brianne is originally from the Island of Hawai'i where she learned how to hunt, fish, and spear dive from her father. She credits these experiences as being of the most influential to her life.

    After graduate school, Brianne plans to return home. She is eager to address the lack of Native and local representation in leadership within the State of Hawai'i, specifically in land and natural resource management. As she wrote in her scholarship essay: “Without the incorporation of Indigenous values that encompass a history and culture deeply connected to land and natural resources, Hawai'i’s resource managers will continue to fail to meet the needs specific to the Islands’ people and communities.” Brianne affirms that, though there are many avenues to accomplish this, her own is through policy.

    When asked the "why" behind her chosen career path, she stated: “It is my duty to ensure that the culture, the livelihood, and the well-being of Hawai'i’s people is preserved.”

    Currently, Brianne works as a Research Assistant for Dr. Dominique David-Chavez on a National Science Foundation (NSF) study. In the NSF study, they are working to develop a code of ethics for federally-funded environmental research projects that work on/in Indigenous lands and/or communities. Brianne is also working as a Congressional Intern for the District Office of U.S. Congressman Joe Neguse.