Program for the 2010 PDI

Friday, January 8th

9:00 AM

Session Title:
How Do CSU Students Experience Diversity?
Presenters:
David McKelfresh,Chris Linder
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Friday, January 8th 2010
Start Time:
9:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
228 LSC
Description:
The results of the 2008 Educational Benchmarking Inc. survey provide insight into the campus climate that both undergraduate and graduate students experience at CSU. Over 1300 students completed the survey providing data on campus climate, student attitudes and beliefs, and satisfaction with the institution. An analysis of the qualitative data collected through this survey provides an understanding of the ways students experience diversity at CSU. Join us for this session to better understand students’ experiences, the strengths of CSU’s diversity efforts, and discussion about ways CSU could improve our climate around diversity issues.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goals: - Inform campus community regarding campus climate for students - Discuss recommendations to improve campus climate for students Targeted audience: faculty and staff

10:00 AM

Session Title:
Contemporary Issues for Student Veterans in Higher Education
Presenters:
Jan Rastall,Ann Ingala
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Friday, January 8th 2010
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
228 LSC
Description:
Student veterans are returning to college in record numbers. Colorado State University has seen a trend in increasing numbers of veterans on campus. Are we as an institution prepared to address this growing population of students? What are the contemporary issues that need attention in order to support the academic success of student veterans? A panel of student veterans will share their experiences.
Goals and Target Audience:
Participants will have a greater understanding of: PTSD and TBI and how these disabilities impact learning; the resources available to student veterans; and the current issues student veterans struggle with. Faculty and staff

9:00 AM

Session Title:
Beyond the Numbers: The National Trends Toward Holistic Admissions
Presenters:
James Rawlins,Renee Orlick
Category:
Diversity
Date:
2010
Start Time:
9:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
224-26 LSC
Description:
What are the national trends in selecting students for college, and what will it change about how students are chosen for admission at Colorado State, and around the country? This session will explain the reasons a holistic approach allows for better selection of a more diverse group of students through the use of essays and other narrative information, as well as considering the local context of the student's opportunities. Attendees of this session can also participate in a subsequent session that simulates the actual selection process.
Goals and Target Audience:
The goal of this session is to demonstrate how non-traditional factors are helping universities and departments make better decisions with the use of more than grades and test scores. Ideally, attendees will better understand CSU's process for selecting students, as well as gaining ideas they might apply in their own departmental admissions processes. While this session will hopefully be accessible to any attendee, the targeted audience is primarily campus and departmental leaders with a passion for finding ways to be inclusive of a diverse student body.

10:00 AM

Session Title:
Supporting and Engaging Students of Color through Learning Communities
Presenters:
Tae Nosaka,Jessica Klingsmith,Jess Burge,Lory Ann Varela,Juwon Melvin
Category:
Diversity
Date:
2010
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
214-16 LSC
Description:
Learning communities are often crafted with a particular population in mind. Often, populations identified as having particular needs related to success in higher education. In 1998, The Key Communities were created with the needs of four very specific populations in mind. During this presentation, we will share the philosophy behind the development of the interdisciplinary learning community which focuses on supporting First Generation to College students, Students of Color, Low-Income students, and Out-of-State students. Participants in this session will learn about the specific components that provide students within the Key Communities the support needed to be successful at Colorado State University. In addition, assessment data will be shared to highlight the program components which have the most impact on student success within our identified populations. However, because the most telling stories are those told by students themselves, student experience and perspectives will be shared. To conclude our session, we will share the lessons learned from a decade of experience implementing this diverse, interdisciplinary community.
Goals and Target Audience:
• Participants will gain an understanding of the structures required to sustain a learning community designed and implemented for underrepresented students. • Participants will hear about the positive outcomes associated with the community through multiple assessments including student satisfaction. • Participants will learn about lessons learned from a decade of experience with a diverse, interdisciplinary learning community

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Using Holistic Assessment to Select a Freshman Class
Presenters:
Jim Rawlins,Renee Orlick,Other Admissions staff
Category:
Diversity
Date:
2010
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
228 LSC
Description:
Building off the earlier session, "Beyond the Numbers: The National Trends Toward Holistic Admissions," this session will provide attendees with a chance to apply what they learn in reviewing a set of fictitious applicant files as part of a mock admissions committee. What should be considered in freshman admissions besides grades and test scores, and why? How can these considerations be carried out equitably and what differences do they make in shaping a class? **Attendees must also attend the "Beyond the Numbers" session to participate in this session.**
Goals and Target Audience:
The goal of this session is to allow participants a first-hand look at using non-traditional factors to make admissions and scholarship decisions. The group will be divided into committees of 3-5 to review a set of files, render admissions and scholarship decisions, and compare their results with other committees. The audience will be any faculty or staff wanting this in-depth understanding of how CSU and other colleges conduct a holistic admissions process. Again, it is a prerequisite that the attendee have also attended related session "Beyond the Numbers."

8:00 AM

Session Title:
Honoring Generations: How do we reach/teach Millennials?
Presenters:
Barbara Wallner
Category:
Diversity
Date:
2010
Start Time:
8:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
224-26 LSC
Description:
Interactive exchange and information sharing to raise awareness, to get the audience thinking, and to reactivate previous knowledge of the participants, so that interactions between generations, especially professors and students, can better facilitate learning...and any other desired outcome.
Goals and Target Audience:
All ages...professors, instructors, grad students, students, staff, etc. To raise awareness of generational characteristics, share some best practices, and reactivate ideas of participants. Whatever your service, this information will hopefully be helpful.

10:00 AM

Session Title:
Promoting Academic Success for First-Generation and Lower-Income Students at CSU
Presenters:
Jody Donovan,Oscar Felix,Andrea Reeve,Paul Thayer
Category:
Diversity
Date:
2010
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
Does socioeconomic status make a difference in college preparation, access, attendance and graduation? Current statistics about college attainment in the 21st Century continue to reflect differences in college attendance rates and graduation for students who come from low-income and/or first-generation (neither parent has a bachelor’s degree) families, including students at Colorado State University, the presenters' institution, who graduate at lower rates than students from higher income and bachelor-degree families. Tom Mortensen, author of Postsecondary Education Opportunity notes that “educational attainment increasingly defines individual, family, community, state and national welfare.” The relationship between educational attainment and income is very high and in addition, there are positive correlates between education and quality of life. Although the hope for the 21st century is that poverty rates would decrease and educational attainment would increase, a study of “College Participation Rates for Low Income Families in FY 2006” indicates a decrease in higher education participation from 2005 to 2006 to 23.8% (Pell grant recipients) compared to 18-24 olds with no Pell Grants (45.4%). This gap is wider than any reported data since FY 1993! College graduation rates for students from the lowest income quartile also reflect percentages much lower than for students from higher income brackets. Although low-income and first-generations students enter postsecondary with the same academic admissions criteria, socio-economic factors present challenges and barriers to college persistence and completion. Programs and partnerships that provide supplemental academic support based on effective practices research on low-income and first generation can increase student success, and creating pipeline partnerships with middle and high schools increase the access of academically prepared students. This session will provide an overview of first-generation and low-income students in higher education and at CSU and will describe programming effective in supporting students’ access, persistence and graduation. The presentation format will include first generation student voices and several interactive activities. This session describes effective practices for faculty, administrators and staff that support the access, persistence and success of low-income and first-generation students in higher education. The session consists of panel discussion with four main components: 1. Statistics and demographic overview of low-income, first-generation students nationally and at CSU 2. Challenges faced by low-income, first-generation students, including voices of students and the results of two qualitative research studies 3. Importance of, and suggestions for effective practices in creating pipeline partnerships 4. Effective practices for faculty, administrators and student services units to create a campus environment conducive to the success of lower income and first generation students. Participant involvement includes a group activity to identify student opportunities and challenges, and discussion. The session’s theoretical framework is based on recent research and literature on socio-economic status and student success in higher education, including demographic information from Tom Mortensen (Postsecondary Opportunity), the Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education (Straight from the source, What works for first-generation college students; Demography is not destiny: increasing the graduation rates of low-income college students at large public universities), Reports from the National Center for Education Statistics (First-generation students: Undergraduates whose parents never enrolled in postsecondary education; First-generation students in postsecondary education: a look at their college transcripts; Students whose parents did not go to college: Postsecondary access, persistence and attainment), and other research literature. All the presenters also have considerable relevant experience in the topic area and have conducted research on these student populations. Background of Presenters/Familiarity of Topic: All of the presenters have research and relevant work experience related to the topic. Both Jody Donovan and Oscar Felix studied low-income and first-generation students for their dissertations and Dr. Donovan has conducted additional research on first generation students in higher education. Oscar Felix is the Executive Director of the Center for Educational Access and Outreach, sponsoring several pre-college access programs and partnerships with schools that serve low-income and first-generation students. Paul Thayer is the author of a journal article, “Retaining first generation and low income students” and has twenty+ years of experience working with low-income and first-generation students in pre-college access programs. He also is a founder of the Colorado State University First Generation Scholarship program that annually provides 55 scholarships to CSU students and persistence support first-generation students. Andrea Reeve has 20 years experience working with pre-college and postsecondary support programs for low-income and first-generation students, and for eight years directed the National TRIO and the Pathways to College Network Clearinghouses (Adjunct ERIC Higher Education Clearinghouses) in the Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education in Washington, DC.
Goals and Target Audience:
Presentation Goals: •Increase awareness about the role of socio-economic status in college access, persistence and graduation, and an overview of current statistical trends •Increase awareness of how SES may affect student involvement and academic achievement •Hear the voices of first-generation, low-income students as they describe their challenges and opportunities *learn about two qualitative research studies of first-generation students •Present effective practices and partnerships to support low-income and first-generation students at the postsecondary level Targeted audience: faculty, administrators and student services staff Note: a version of this session was presented at the CSU Diversity Conference, but had few if any, faculty in attendance.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Student Parent Barriers to Academic Success
Presenters:
Jan Rastall
Category:
Diversity
Date:
2010
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
228 LSC
Description:
According to recent data obtained through the registrars office, there are approximately 400 student parents at Colorado State. Last spring, a TILT working committee with representatives from departments across campus (TILT, the English Department, Continuing Education, a graduate student, Morgan Library, and Adult Learner and Veteran Services) developed an assessment to administer to student parents. The results of the assessment will be presented and a discussion will be facilitated that will address the barriers to academic success student parents experience. At the conclusion of the session, participants will understand the main barriers students with children experience; the resources required to overcome barriers; and current resources available to manage barriers to academic success.
Goals and Target Audience:
At the conclusion of the session, participants will understand the main barriers students with children experience; the resources required to overcome barriers; and current resources available to manage barriers to academic success. Faculty and staff

2:00 PM

Session Title:
If you build it, who will come?: Designing with diversity in mind
Presenters:
Paul Thayer,Tae Nosaka
Category:
Diversity
Date:
2010
Start Time:
2:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
Colorado State University offers a variety of opportunities that support student success, from learning communities to workshops to learning enrichment programs to student organizations. But who will participate? Will the program or activity attract a broad population that includes students from underrepresented backgrounds? Programs, workshops, and events at predominantly white institutions, including ours, often struggle to attract participation and engagement of underrepresented students. This workshop, Designing with Diversity in Mind, suggests ways for reframing programs and recruitment processes to produce different results. The premise of the workshop is that different populations of students have different needs, and that it is by designing with diversity in mind that we achieve the goal of inclusive participation. Practical tips, real examples, and voices of students will illustrate the model.
Goals and Target Audience:
Targeted audience includes faculty, staff, and students who are responsible for developing and implementing events, workshops, and programs on campus, and have the goal of engaging a diverse group of students. Goals: • Consider the importance of making diversity an explicit element of the design process. • Understand the factors in students’ experiences that may prevent them from engaging in learning opportunities. • Hear the experiences of current students from underrepresented backgrounds as they share candidly what it took to engage them in campus programs. • Share practices that have been successful at CSU for reaching a diverse student population.