Program for the 2010 PDI

Friday, January 8th

8:00 AM

Session Title:
Inspiring First Year Students to Get to Year 2!
Presenters:
Keith Lopez,Jordan King
Category:
Personal/Professional Enrichment
Date:
Friday, January 8th 2010
Start Time:
8:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
An emerging area of research for campuses across the country has been that of second year student transition needs and how to assist with the “sophomore slump”. While many campuses explore programming solely during the second year to address these needs, Orientation & Transition Programs at Colorado State University has taken a proactive and innovative approach by creating the Getting to Year 2 @ CSU Conference. This conference for first year students in their second semester takes what students say they need their second year, and provides it for them in an engaging, flexible and inspiring way! This interactive program will discuss the research on second year student issues, assessment and development of the Getting to Year 2 @ CSU Conference at Colorado State University and how staff and faculty across campus can work together to create successful experiences on campus for both first and second year students.
Goals and Target Audience:
Program Goals and Learning Outcomes: - To explore creating student focused transition and retention programming the first year of college - To look at the development of creative and research based programming that focuses on student engagement in their collegiate experience - To examine and discuss second year student transition issues - To discuss how second year student transition relates back to messages we are sending our students beginning at orientation - To highlight Colorado State University’s orientation and transition practices by sharing successes and challenges in developing programming for first & second year students - To discuss and share the importance of campus collaboration in creating intentional programming for first & second year students

9:00 AM

Session Title:
Do Over! Taking Advantage of Life’s Changes
Presenters:
Kevin Nolan
Category:
Personal/Professional Enrichment
Date:
Friday, January 8th 2010
Start Time:
9:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
An echo from our youth, “Do over.” We made a mistake, the ball went into the cranky neighbor’s yard, I wasn’t ready yet! Whatever the reason, we got a second chance. Do you think President Kennedy was correct when he said “Things do not happen. They are made to happen.”? In life, there are some natural times where we are more likely to make the most of another opportunity. Come discuss how well we recognize and take advantage of these moments.
Goals and Target Audience:
In this workshop we’ll: -Discuss how to recognize second chance opportunities. -Examine some of the beliefs and attitudes that might be preventing us from making a change. -Identify tools and support that can help us when that moment arrives. Open to anyone who believes in a second chance!

10:00 AM

Session Title:
Do CSU Students Cheat and How Can We Prevent It?
Presenters:
Elaine Green
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Friday, January 8th 2010
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
This session will present results of the recent Academic Integrity student survey conducted at CSU. Pedagogical and classroom management strategies for reducing academic misconduct in various types of academic work: papers, tests, group projects, and lab reports will be shared and discussed, as well as suggestions for clarifying acceptable collaboration.
Goals and Target Audience:
Target = Faculty, GTA’s, and other instructors Goals: 1. To build an understanding of the level of cheating and attitudes toward cheating among students at CSU. 2. To increase awareness of various strategies for reducing academic misconduct 3. To share information with instructors of CSU resources for assisting them when confronted with the suspicion of student academic misconduct.

11:00 AM

Session Title:
Oracle Reports - audit, review, documentation
Presenters:
Joanne Robel,Vickie Schultz,Shelly Lynch
Category:
Administrative Topics
Date:
Friday, January 8th 2010
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
Overview of Oracle Management reports and audit requirements. Overview of Labor Distribution and redistribution from the payroll perspective. Review of Certification Reporting and process. Discussion on campus representative questions on Oracle management reports.
Goals and Target Audience:
Assist Business Managers, accounting staff, and other staff members to increase understanding of how to access information on Labor Distribution, Certification Reporting and Management Reporting. Increase understanding of requirements for review of these areas and the responsibilities involved in working in these areas.

8:00 AM

Session Title:
Special Course Fee accounts
Presenters:
Valerie Monahan,Lee Nagle
Category:
Administrative Topics
Date:
2010
Start Time:
8:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
Provides training on special course fee accounts- how they work and what is needed to accurately account for these funds. Includes overview of the special course fee request form and the annual review form.
Goals and Target Audience:
Those handling special course fee accounts.

9:00 AM

Session Title:
HRS Records Top 10 Frequently Asked Questions
Presenters:
Cindy Donner,Lisa Melhem
Category:
Administrative Topics
Date:
2010
Start Time:
9:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
This session will provide information relating to frequently asked questions pertaining to Faculty, Admin Professional, State Classified, Non-Student Hourly, and Graduate Assistant personnel actions and records. It will include information on processing State Classified and Faculty/AP LWOP, Faculty/AP reappointments, and determination of when the 6 month limitation will be met for Non-Student Hourly employees.
Goals and Target Audience:
Departmental HR liaisons

11:00 AM

Session Title:
DARS – Degree Audit Reporting System
Presenters:
Kelley Brundage,Jamie Yarbrough
Category:
Administrative Topics
Date:
2010
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
Introduction to the Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS). This session will give an overview of how to request and understand the undergraduate degree audit available through ARIESweb. Additional information will be provided regarding requesting exceptions, available options such as in-progress work and handling interdisciplinary studies.
Goals and Target Audience:
Our intention is to provide training for staff or those that are unfamiliar with using DARS as well as answers questions for the more experienced user.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Hiring and Paying Foreign Nationals
Presenters:
Paul Collier,Matthew Wills
Category:
Administrative Topics
Date:
2010
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
This session will be presented in two parts. The first hour will be an overview of employment visa categories and instructions for initiating visa processing for foreign nationals hired by your department. The second hour will be a discussion regarding completion of the I-9 and making payments to foreign nationals through travel and accounts payable.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goals - To educate departments on what to do after an offer of employment is accepted by a foreign national and how to pay him/her as quickly and as easily as possible. Target Audience - Individuals in departments that have HR responsibilities and will be requesting payments to foreign nationals.

3:00 PM

Session Title:
The five W's (Who, What, Where, Why and When) of the Graduate Teaching Certificate Program
Presenters:
Sandy Chapman,Shaun Beaty
Category:
Personal/Professional Enrichment
Date:
2010
Start Time:
3:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
An overview of the Graduate Teaching Certificate program supported by The Institute for Learning and Teaching.
Goals and Target Audience:
Describe the Graduate Teaching Certificate program. Audience includes graduate students and faculty members.

8:00 AM

Session Title:
GI Bill Education Benefits at CSU
Presenters:
Glen Vance
Category:
Advising Students
Date:
2010
Start Time:
8:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
Overview of veteran education benefits and how they work at CSU including the new post-911 GI bill as well as the Montgomery, Reserve, and National Guard bills.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goal: --Educate audience on the basic process for applying for benefits through the Registrar's Office. Targeted Audience: --Faculty and staff

10:00 AM

Session Title:
Promoting Academic Success for First-Generation and Lower-Income Students at CSU
Presenters:
Jody Donovan,Oscar Felix,Andrea Reeve,Paul Thayer
Category:
Diversity
Date:
2010
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
Does socioeconomic status make a difference in college preparation, access, attendance and graduation? Current statistics about college attainment in the 21st Century continue to reflect differences in college attendance rates and graduation for students who come from low-income and/or first-generation (neither parent has a bachelor’s degree) families, including students at Colorado State University, the presenters' institution, who graduate at lower rates than students from higher income and bachelor-degree families. Tom Mortensen, author of Postsecondary Education Opportunity notes that “educational attainment increasingly defines individual, family, community, state and national welfare.” The relationship between educational attainment and income is very high and in addition, there are positive correlates between education and quality of life. Although the hope for the 21st century is that poverty rates would decrease and educational attainment would increase, a study of “College Participation Rates for Low Income Families in FY 2006” indicates a decrease in higher education participation from 2005 to 2006 to 23.8% (Pell grant recipients) compared to 18-24 olds with no Pell Grants (45.4%). This gap is wider than any reported data since FY 1993! College graduation rates for students from the lowest income quartile also reflect percentages much lower than for students from higher income brackets. Although low-income and first-generations students enter postsecondary with the same academic admissions criteria, socio-economic factors present challenges and barriers to college persistence and completion. Programs and partnerships that provide supplemental academic support based on effective practices research on low-income and first generation can increase student success, and creating pipeline partnerships with middle and high schools increase the access of academically prepared students. This session will provide an overview of first-generation and low-income students in higher education and at CSU and will describe programming effective in supporting students’ access, persistence and graduation. The presentation format will include first generation student voices and several interactive activities. This session describes effective practices for faculty, administrators and staff that support the access, persistence and success of low-income and first-generation students in higher education. The session consists of panel discussion with four main components: 1. Statistics and demographic overview of low-income, first-generation students nationally and at CSU 2. Challenges faced by low-income, first-generation students, including voices of students and the results of two qualitative research studies 3. Importance of, and suggestions for effective practices in creating pipeline partnerships 4. Effective practices for faculty, administrators and student services units to create a campus environment conducive to the success of lower income and first generation students. Participant involvement includes a group activity to identify student opportunities and challenges, and discussion. The session’s theoretical framework is based on recent research and literature on socio-economic status and student success in higher education, including demographic information from Tom Mortensen (Postsecondary Opportunity), the Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education (Straight from the source, What works for first-generation college students; Demography is not destiny: increasing the graduation rates of low-income college students at large public universities), Reports from the National Center for Education Statistics (First-generation students: Undergraduates whose parents never enrolled in postsecondary education; First-generation students in postsecondary education: a look at their college transcripts; Students whose parents did not go to college: Postsecondary access, persistence and attainment), and other research literature. All the presenters also have considerable relevant experience in the topic area and have conducted research on these student populations. Background of Presenters/Familiarity of Topic: All of the presenters have research and relevant work experience related to the topic. Both Jody Donovan and Oscar Felix studied low-income and first-generation students for their dissertations and Dr. Donovan has conducted additional research on first generation students in higher education. Oscar Felix is the Executive Director of the Center for Educational Access and Outreach, sponsoring several pre-college access programs and partnerships with schools that serve low-income and first-generation students. Paul Thayer is the author of a journal article, “Retaining first generation and low income students” and has twenty+ years of experience working with low-income and first-generation students in pre-college access programs. He also is a founder of the Colorado State University First Generation Scholarship program that annually provides 55 scholarships to CSU students and persistence support first-generation students. Andrea Reeve has 20 years experience working with pre-college and postsecondary support programs for low-income and first-generation students, and for eight years directed the National TRIO and the Pathways to College Network Clearinghouses (Adjunct ERIC Higher Education Clearinghouses) in the Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education in Washington, DC.
Goals and Target Audience:
Presentation Goals: •Increase awareness about the role of socio-economic status in college access, persistence and graduation, and an overview of current statistical trends •Increase awareness of how SES may affect student involvement and academic achievement •Hear the voices of first-generation, low-income students as they describe their challenges and opportunities *learn about two qualitative research studies of first-generation students •Present effective practices and partnerships to support low-income and first-generation students at the postsecondary level Targeted audience: faculty, administrators and student services staff Note: a version of this session was presented at the CSU Diversity Conference, but had few if any, faculty in attendance.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Students Today, Leaders Tomorrow
Presenters:
Alexis Hendrix,Lindsay Fera
Category:
Other
Date:
2010
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
Explore how you, as a professional in Higher Education, can influence, motivate and engage the students that you work with to transform them into leaders. This session will investigate Campus Recreation's model of student development and leadership, and examine how professional staff members are creating opportunities for student leadership, student-led initatives, and peer mentorship.
Goals and Target Audience:
The session is open to anyone interested in learning about how to engage and motivate the students they work with (inside and outside of a classroom setting) in an effort to transform them into leaders. All those in attendance should expect to take away ideas for student engagement and models for creating student leadership initiatives. The presentation will be given from the perspective of two young professionals.

2:00 PM

Session Title:
If you build it, who will come?: Designing with diversity in mind
Presenters:
Paul Thayer,Tae Nosaka
Category:
Diversity
Date:
2010
Start Time:
2:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
213-15 LSC
Description:
Colorado State University offers a variety of opportunities that support student success, from learning communities to workshops to learning enrichment programs to student organizations. But who will participate? Will the program or activity attract a broad population that includes students from underrepresented backgrounds? Programs, workshops, and events at predominantly white institutions, including ours, often struggle to attract participation and engagement of underrepresented students. This workshop, Designing with Diversity in Mind, suggests ways for reframing programs and recruitment processes to produce different results. The premise of the workshop is that different populations of students have different needs, and that it is by designing with diversity in mind that we achieve the goal of inclusive participation. Practical tips, real examples, and voices of students will illustrate the model.
Goals and Target Audience:
Targeted audience includes faculty, staff, and students who are responsible for developing and implementing events, workshops, and programs on campus, and have the goal of engaging a diverse group of students. Goals: • Consider the importance of making diversity an explicit element of the design process. • Understand the factors in students’ experiences that may prevent them from engaging in learning opportunities. • Hear the experiences of current students from underrepresented backgrounds as they share candidly what it took to engage them in campus programs. • Share practices that have been successful at CSU for reaching a diverse student population.