Program for the 2012 PDI

Tuesday, January 10th

11:00 AM

Session Title:
There’s more to research than Wikipedia: Engaging students in the age of Google
Presenters:
Amy Hoseth
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 10th 2012
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
Morgan Library CC175
Description:
In an age where “everything is available on Google,” how can you convince students to go further and use authoritative, scholarly sources for their research? This PDI session will explore the concept of information literacy, and will emphasize the importance of improving students’ information-seeking behavior by building research requirements into classroom activities and homework. Participants will discuss how to help students navigate today’s information landscape, and will learn tips and suggestions for creating effective library research assignments. Attendees will also have the opportunity to update and improve their own research skills using online article databases and the Internet.
Goals and Target Audience:
This session is targeted at faculty and instructors. Goals for the session include: * gaining a working knowledge of information literacy, * understanding where students have information "gaps," and how to help students address those gaps, * learn how to create effective library research assignments, and * improve their own research skills, and learn how to guide students to the best research sources.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Understanding Students on the Autism Spectrum = Increased Success
Presenters:
Kathleen Ivy,Karin Bright,Julia Kothe
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 10th 2012
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
214/16 LSC
Description:
This session will provide attendees insight into the strengths and challenges of students diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). As more and more students with ASD attend CSU, it is increasingly important for faculty and staff to have knowledge of this often misunderstood invisible disability. Participants will learn teaching strategies, tips on communication and potential accommodations that can help students on the spectrum succeed.
Goals and Target Audience:
The goal of this session is to help faculty and staff gain greater insight and knowledge into the strengths and challenges of students diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders, as well as strategies that promote success for these students in and out of the classroom.

Wednesday, January 11th

10:00 AM

Session Title:
Documenting your Teaching Performance in the Digital Age
Presenters:
Laurie Carlson
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 11th 2012
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
Morgan Library CC174
Description:
During this session, attendees will learn how to develop a multi-faceted teaching dossier for annual performance reviews and/or tenure and promotion packets. Particular attention will be given to annual performance documentation and exciting possibilities with new digital technologies.
Goals and Target Audience:
This session is for anyone who is teaching including graduate teaching assistants, instructors, adjuncts, special teaching appointments and tenure line faculty. The first portion of the session will address identification of teaching strengths and how to develop/collect artifacts that demonstrate those strengths. The second half of the session will examine complimentary technology such as PDF portfolios, google docs, animoto and other related programs.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Top Lessons the National Academies of Science Summer Institute on Scientific Teaching
Presenters:
Patricia Bedinger,Debbie Garrity,Tingting Yao
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 11th 2012
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
208 LSC
Description:
We, along with faculty from other western states, attended a weeklong workshop on Scientific Teaching last summer, funded by the National Academies of Science and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The goal of these workshops, which are held throughout the country, is to revolutionize science undergraduate teaching in research universities. We learned a great deal about how to best teach science, including the use of backwards course design, formative assessments and active learning. In this session we distill what we learned so that you will come away with the essence of that workshop.
Goals and Target Audience:
Faculty teaching undergraduates
Session Title:
What makes a good test question?
Presenters:
Karen Rambo-Hernandez
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 11th 2012
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
221 TILT Building
Description:
Ever wonder what is really inside your students' heads? In this interactive session, we will examine what makes a test item good (able to determine student knowledge) and what makes a test item bad (unable to determine student knowledge). Participants will critique multiple items and leave with a checklist of how to determine the quality of an item. Practical tips will be discussed that will be able to be applied immediately to improve multiple choice and short answer assessments.
Goals and Target Audience:
university faculty, graduate teaching assistants

2:00 PM

Session Title:
Non-Native English Speakers in University Classes
Presenters:
Mary Wedum,Nancy Berry
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 11th 2012
Start Time:
2:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
214/16 LSC
Description:
Given CSU's recent intention to increase the numbers of international students on campus, faculty may have concerns about how to best serve non-native English speakers in their classes. Effective strategies for helping these students will be discussed.
Goals and Target Audience:
Share effective strategies for working with non-native English speakers in university classes. Faculty

10:00 AM

Session Title:
Teaching Theory and the Classroom: A Working Session for Putting Theory into Practice
Presenters:
Rebecca Wentworth,Dean Nelson
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
2012
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
Virginia Dale - LSC
Description:
Participants will be briefly introduced to principles of learning then asked to work with a lesson from their own practice to design a lesson making use of principles of learning to reach more learners. Facilitators will encourage discussion between participants to create a single lesson as a first step in implementing learner-centered classroom practices.
Goals and Target Audience:
Working session targeted to classroom instructors with little background in learning theory and principles of learning. TAs, GTAs, content instructors, and anyone looking to add an extra dimension to their classroom practice will benefit from this instruction.
Session Title:
Using the CSU Honor Pledge to Enhance Academic Integrity
Presenters:
Elaine Green
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
2012
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
210 LSC
Description:
Our honor pledge has now been "on the books" for it's first full academic semester. In this interactive session, we will discuss how instructors are using the honor pledge and techniques to enhance it's effectiveness to promote a culture of academic integrity in their courses.
Goals and Target Audience:
Faculty and other instructors will examine strategies for implementing the new academic integrity section (I.5.1) of the Faculty and Administrative Profession Manual.

11:00 AM

Session Title:
NCAA Rules and Student-Athletes
Presenters:
Shalini Shanker,Steve McDonnell
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
2012
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
208 LSC
Description:
This session is geared to explain the various NCAA rules that impact student-athletes such as academic rules and involvement with faculty and staff. We will also discuss a day in the life of a student-athlete to give a better understanding of what the life of a student-athlete is like.
Goals and Target Audience:
Any faculty and staff that have interaction with student-athletes.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Strategies for Reducing Student Academic Misconduct: A Magic Bullet?
Presenters:
Elaine Green
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
2012
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
210 LSC
Description:
This workshop will explore strategies that faculty and other instructors can employ to minimize student cheating in their classes. We will discuss prevention ideas for written assignments, group projects, homework, lab reports, exams and quizzes, ultimately addressing the question “Is there a ‘magic bullet’ to eliminate academic misconduct?”
Goals and Target Audience:
Faculty and other instructors will determine strategies to enhance the pedagogy utilized in the setting in which they teach.
Session Title:
What Works in Undergraduate Science Education?
Presenters:
Heidi Iverson
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
2012
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
2 Hours, 50 Minutes
Room:
Virginia Dale - LSC
Description:
The organization of the session will involve short mini-presentations to introduce topics followed up by interactive group-work, where participants will have time to talk about their ideas and give and receive feedback from other participants.
Goals and Target Audience:
This session has two goals. The first goal is for participants to learn about recent reform-oriented curricular and instructional approaches in undergraduate science education. The second goal of this session is for participants to learn about how to best conduct a study on the effect of an educational intervention. In other words, this session will focus on best practices in undergraduate science education as well as best practices in studying undergraduate science education. The three hour session will be split roughly into two equal parts. Individuals interested in knowing more about reform in the college science classroom or individuals currently reforming their teaching will benefit from hearing what others are trying and how best to study the effectiveness of their efforts.

2:00 PM

Session Title:
A Growing Population - Transfer Students at CSU
Presenters:
Paul Giberson,Kathy Klein,Chelsie Taresh
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
2012
Start Time:
2:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
214/16 LSC
Description:
Even as the numbers increase nationally, transfer students are still often the forgotten population at colleges and universities across the country. This presentation will explore transfer student characteristics and provide an overview of ways we can continue to validate the transfer student experience. In addition, participants will have the opportunity to ask question and listen to the experiences of current students who transferred to Colorado State University.
Goals and Target Audience:
Participants will learn more about the transfer student population here at CSU and around the United States. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about the transfer experience through the stories of current students. Participants will learn about the resources and services designed to support transfer students as they transition into CSU. This presentation is for faculty and staff interested in learning more about the transfer student experience.

3:00 PM

Session Title:
Beyond Anecdote: CSU Students' Characteristics and Challenges
Presenters:
Jody Donovan,Paul Thayer,Linda Ahuna-Hamill
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
2012
Start Time:
3:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
220/22 LSC
Description:
Today's college students are different from past generations. The division of student affairs has been collecting and analyzing data regarding student characteristics, attitudes, values and behaviors over the past 30 years. This session goes beyond anecdotes to inform teaching and learning with today's college students. Learn how CSU students compare to our institutional peers and national norms utilizing data rather than anecdote and discuss how faculty and staff can respond to increase student success.
Goals and Target Audience:
Participants will learn about national and campus-based assessments of student characteristics, attitudes, values and behaviors Participants will learn about how CSU students compare to our institutional peers and national norms on various measures related to student characteristics, attitudes, values and behaviors Participants will engage in discussions related to how this information can inform teaching as well as support in and out of the classroom for student success Targeted Audience: Faculty and staff who work directly with students or have positions on campus that support student success
Session Title:
Learning Communities: High Impact Practices for Retention and Student Success
Presenters:
Tae Nosaka
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
2012
Start Time:
3:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
208 LSC
Description:
Student Retention. Student Satisfaction. Student Engagement. Student Learning. These sound bites have become mantras within higher education as institutions become more concerned with enrollment, retention, academic achievement, and the overall experience of undergraduate students in the face of declining financial resources while increasing the focus on student learning. Learning Communities (cohorts of students intentionally brought together around a common purpose with structured integration of curricular and co-curricular elements in order to promote student learning, retention, and success) have become an important strategy at CSU for enriching learning and realizing university retention goals. This session will provide an overview of Learning Communities, talk about student engagement in the context of Learning Communities, share exciting practices occurring here at CSU, show the impact that Learning Communities have had on retention and student success, and suggest some future trends and recommendations.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goals: 1. Provide an overview of Learning Communities 2. Share how Learning Communities foster student engagement 3. Highlight exciting initiatives at CSU 4. Demonstrate success of Learning Community participants in relation to retention and student success 5. Suggest some future trends and recommendations Faculty, staff, and students.