Program for the 2013 PDI

Tuesday, January 15th

10:00 AM

Session Title:
Enhancing student learning through 3D Visualization
Presenters:
Scott Glick,Caroline Clevenger
Category:
Critical Thinking
Date:
Tuesday, January 15th 2013
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
221 TILT Building
Description:
This presentation will discuss the integration of 3D visualization techniques into the classroom to develop virtual learning environments that help students to visualize real-world problems and develop applied critical problem solving skills. Construction education traditionally uses experiential learning to assist in the delivery of course content that requires spatial cognition and visualization. The presenters will discuss their efforts to develop and design educational modules to support and enhance spatial understanding, interoperability, and communication within construction education and training.
Goals and Target Audience:
The targeted audience is educators who teach applied subjects who are interested integrating 3D visualization techniques into their lessons.

11:00 AM

Session Title:
How Can Instructors Use Questions to Promote Critical Thinking? "Now THAT’S a Good Question."
Presenters:
Nancy Henke,Emily Morgan
Category:
Critical Thinking
Date:
Tuesday, January 15th 2013
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
221 TILT Building
Description:
Nothing encourages curiosity more than seeking answers to really good questions, so using questions to promote critical thinking would be the focus of this session. As teachers, we know that questions are more than a way to test knowledge. They can be a means of increasing engagement, promoting critical thinking, and encouraging thoughtful discussion. It is therefore useful and beneficial to refine our questioning skills to increase student learning. Not only is there value in instructors refining their questioning ability, there is also substantial value in the students’ participation in the crafting of good questions—it’s another level of engaged critical thinking that allows students to develop the art of good inquiry. This session will explore a two-pronged approach in the art of asking questions: how faculty can ask better questions of their students (during class discussion, for writing prompts, and when commenting on student papers) and how students can be instructed to ask/write good questions for in-class and/or online discussions. Both of these approaches have the common goal of inspiring genuine curiosity and engaging critical thinking within the classroom environment –both the physical space as well as the digital space.
Goals and Target Audience:
The primary audience for this session is instructors who want to refine their questioning capabilities. The goals for this audience include the following: creating good questions that prompt students to critically engage with the content during class discussion; creating good questions that students can critically respond to on forums (or other online media); creating good questions that students can critically respond to in papers and in-class writing activities; helping students understand how to ask good questions and why it's beneficial; and finally, having students practice the art of questioning within a class discussion and/or an online discussion.

2:00 PM

Session Title:
Developing Courses that Challenge Students to Think Critically
Presenters:
Mike Palmquist
Category:
Critical Thinking
Date:
Tuesday, January 15th 2013
Start Time:
2:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
203-05 LSC
Description:
Many lower-division courses seek largely to help students remember and understand information within a given discipline. These courses typically rely on lecture and readings to deliver information and on multiple-choice examinations to assess student learning. In this session, participants will be presented with a framework, based on Bloom’s Taxonomy of Cognitive Skills, for determining what level of critical thinking is appropriate for students in a given course. That framework will then be used to consider a range of classroom practices, assignments, and assessment tools that can be used to deepen student learning. The session will involve discussion and group work. Participants will be asked to develop a preliminary plan for enhancing their own courses.
Goals and Target Audience:
Members of the CSU Community who teach courses.

Wednesday, January 16th

2:00 PM

Session Title:
Tips for Teaching Sustainability
Presenters:
William Timpson,Brian Dunbar,Peter Newman,Brett Bruyere,Gailmarie Kimmel
Category:
Critical Thinking
Date:
Wednesday, January 16th 2013
Start Time:
2:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
203-05 LSC
Description:
This short program is built around a book, 147 Tips for Teaching Sustainability, that was authored by several faculty members at Colorado State University and others who represent a range of disciplines, levels, and institutions. This workshop will introduce a range of concepts for teaching sustainability—perhaps the most compelling issue for this next century—as well as allow sufficient time for discussion and audience interaction. In addition, various methods of feedback will be offered, including the principles that can guide peer feedback and coaching and the use of a mid-semester student feedback system so that lessons learned can be reinforced and extended.
Goals and Target Audience:
Increase awareness about the concept of sustainability and how it can best be taught and learned. Instructors and teachers at all levels and in all disciplines are welcomed.