Program for the 2013 PDI

Tuesday, January 15th

2:00 PM

Session Title:
Improving graduate student writing: Models and Opportunities
Presenters:
Kate Kiefer,Sue Doe
Category:
Writing and WAC
Date:
Tuesday, January 15th 2013
Start Time:
2:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
105 TILT Building
Description:
Graduate students often feel overwhelmed by the academic and professional writing demanded in their graduate seminars, grant proposals, and other professional settings. In this session, we offer a model of an introductory graduate writing course (for graduate students in their first semester of study) that emphasizes writing to specialized academic audiences as well as to larger audiences outside their disciplines. We then consider options for thesis/dissertation writing support as well as additional opportunities in coursework throughout the graduate program. We will conclude by discussing with all attendees what opportunities and barriers they see in supporting graduate students as writers in their programs.
Goals and Target Audience:
This session aims to engage participants in thinking about when and how to support graduate students as they take on the communication requirements of graduate and professional writing. The session welcomes graduate students and faculty from across the campus interested in integrating writing support into their courses and departmental programs.

Wednesday, January 16th

1:00 PM

Session Title:
In-Class Mini-Writing: Deepen Student Thinking Without Going Knee-Deep in Work
Presenters:
Sue Doe,Karla Gingerich
Category:
Writing and WAC
Date:
Wednesday, January 16th 2013
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
105 TILT Building
Description:
Undergraduate students too often sit idly in class, perhaps imagining that their presence alone translates to comprehension and retention of course material. Then exam time arrives and it becomes clear that a half-attentive approach to classroom time hasn't served them well. In this session, we offer a model of an in-class mini writing sequence that probes student understanding and compels students to think. This type of writing does not require extensive individual feedback but can be quickly assessed to achieve both student accountability and an understanding of whole-class needs. Meanwhile, engaged students gain direct benefit from the effort involved in thinking through writing. The model was recently tested by the presenters who found modest gains in student performance as result of informal, in-class writing.
Goals and Target Audience:
This session aims to engage participants in thinking about how and when to support student thinking through low-stakes writing that requires similarly low-stakes grading. The session welcomes graduate students and faculty from across the campus who are interested in integrating writing into their courses and departmental programs.