Program for the 2013 PDI

Tuesday, January 15th

9:00 AM

Session Title:
“Teachership: Leadership in the Classroom”
Presenters:
Thomas Conway
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 15th 2013
Start Time:
9:00 AM
Session Length:
2 Hours, 50 Minutes
Room:
105 TILT Building
Description:
"Teachership: Leadership in the Classroom" will examine how a teacher can utilize leadership science to create an environment that optimizes effectiveness in leading students towards curriculum, group and personal goals.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goals and Target Audience Audience: The target audience for "Teachership: Leading in the Classroom" is new and old teachers who are continually looking for ways to grow in their teaching skills. Goals of "Teachership: Leading in the Classroom" • "Know thy teaching self:" An intimate understanding of our teaching strengths and weaknesses can enlighten our classrooms and courses as we strive to lead a diverse student body. This session will help teachers develop and hone effective teaching personas that utilize personal strengths and flexibility in our growth areas. • "Know thy students:" To understand both student cognitive and social development and how these factors can determine leadership behavior in the classroom. This session will connect leadership styles to student development encouraging leaders to adapt styles appropriately to connect more effectively with student development. • To understand group dynamics: Just as our students have their own characters and particular qualities they bring to the classroom, groups likewise develop personalities. The session will look at groups holistically, seeing how leading a community can ensure that individuals meet their goals. • To enhance effective decision making: Equipped with an awareness of our leadership styles and our students’ development we can better understand our pedagogical and structural decisions at the semester, unit, class, and activity levels. • To understand leadership theories: We will bring the above goals together with an attention to modern leadership theories, such as situational leadership, leadership and new science, and servant leadership and how these theories apply in the college classroom. Leadership theories abound in certain contexts such as business, management, organization development, military science, and outdoor education. This session will bring some of these theories into the context of the college classroom in order to make strong effective connections between teacher, student and group.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Learning to Teach by Teaching: Professional Development for new TAs
Presenters:
Daniel Reinholz,Mary Pilgrim
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 15th 2013
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
105 TILT Building
Description:
New graduate teaching assistants are often expected to begin teaching with little to no professional development or instruction on how to teach. In this proposal we discuss techniques for teaching new teachers "on the fly" as they begin their journey into the classroom (i.e. we introduce classroom activities that the teacher will learn to become a more proficient teacher through teaching with). In particular, we focus on special activities created to influence the teacher's regular classroom practice. We focus on activities that will help new teachers become more aware of and responsive to student thinking, which forms the foundation for effective classroom practice. Although these techniques have been developed in the context of mathematics, they should be easily adaptable to other academic fields.
Goals and Target Audience:
This session is appropriate for: teacher trainers (e.g., course coordinators), new teachers, or any teacher who would like to think more about student thinking. The goal is that participants who attend the session will leave with practical techniques and activities they can use in their classroom (or implement in the classrooms of others).

2:00 PM

Session Title:
Improving graduate student writing: Models and Opportunities
Presenters:
Kate Kiefer,Sue Doe
Category:
Writing and WAC
Date:
Tuesday, January 15th 2013
Start Time:
2:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
105 TILT Building
Description:
Graduate students often feel overwhelmed by the academic and professional writing demanded in their graduate seminars, grant proposals, and other professional settings. In this session, we offer a model of an introductory graduate writing course (for graduate students in their first semester of study) that emphasizes writing to specialized academic audiences as well as to larger audiences outside their disciplines. We then consider options for thesis/dissertation writing support as well as additional opportunities in coursework throughout the graduate program. We will conclude by discussing with all attendees what opportunities and barriers they see in supporting graduate students as writers in their programs.
Goals and Target Audience:
This session aims to engage participants in thinking about when and how to support graduate students as they take on the communication requirements of graduate and professional writing. The session welcomes graduate students and faculty from across the campus interested in integrating writing support into their courses and departmental programs.

Wednesday, January 16th

10:00 AM

Session Title:
Collaborative Curiosity: How One Working Group Inspired Each Other to Try New Technologies
Presenters:
Pam Coke, Anton Betten,,Gary Carpenter, Deb Colbert,,Harold Gamble, Sharon Grindle,,Cate Meyer, Jane Shaw,,and Theresa Wernimont
Category:
General Technology Issues
Date:
Wednesday, January 16th 2013
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
105 TILT Building
Description:
This session will be collaborative and interactive. The presenters, who hail from a variety of departments and colleges around campus, will guide participants through a mini-retreat, similar to the TILT teaching retreat in which we participated as a group in the summer of 2012. Each presenter will share a part of the retreat that inspired him/her to try something new in the classroom, from instructional videos to student-created documentaries. In addition, each presenter will share one new idea he/she has tried in the classroom this academic year as a result of taking part in this working group.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goals: 1. The presenters will share how a TILT summer teaching retreat had a direct impact on their teaching and learning. 2. The presenters will share technology-infused teaching ideas which stem from their own curiosity about the possibilities that technology affords them as teachers and as learners. 3. The presenters will share how they have kept their intellectual curiosity alive by meeting once per month to collaborate on their teaching and learning. Target Audience: Colleagues who are seeking meaningful, engaging ways to incorporate technology into their classrooms (as opposed to technology for the sake of technology).

1:00 PM

Session Title:
In-Class Mini-Writing: Deepen Student Thinking Without Going Knee-Deep in Work
Presenters:
Sue Doe,Karla Gingerich
Category:
Writing and WAC
Date:
Wednesday, January 16th 2013
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
105 TILT Building
Description:
Undergraduate students too often sit idly in class, perhaps imagining that their presence alone translates to comprehension and retention of course material. Then exam time arrives and it becomes clear that a half-attentive approach to classroom time hasn't served them well. In this session, we offer a model of an in-class mini writing sequence that probes student understanding and compels students to think. This type of writing does not require extensive individual feedback but can be quickly assessed to achieve both student accountability and an understanding of whole-class needs. Meanwhile, engaged students gain direct benefit from the effort involved in thinking through writing. The model was recently tested by the presenters who found modest gains in student performance as result of informal, in-class writing.
Goals and Target Audience:
This session aims to engage participants in thinking about how and when to support student thinking through low-stakes writing that requires similarly low-stakes grading. The session welcomes graduate students and faculty from across the campus who are interested in integrating writing into their courses and departmental programs.