Program for the 2013 PDI

Tuesday, January 15th

9:00 AM

Session Title:
Finding Your Inner Voice and Using It Effectively
Presenters:
Maggie Graham
Category:
Personal/Professional Enrichment
Date:
Tuesday, January 15th 2013
Start Time:
9:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
210 LSC
Description:
Do you say "yes" and then later wish you’d said "no"? You're not alone! Spend some time identifying the dimensions of your inner voice and exploring avenues of healthy expression for it. We'll differentiate between requests, boundaries and manipulation. Together, we'll generate key questions to ask yourself before setting a boundary. There will also be time to practice the art of saying "no."
Goals and Target Audience:
Goals: Explore patterns that tend to trigger struggles for many people around assertiveness. Identify and practice avenues for healthy self-expression. Recognize the difference between a request, a boundary, and manipulation. Build assertiveness skills. Intended audience: People who want to increase their assertiveness skills.

11:00 AM

Session Title:
Creating Service-Learning Action: Connecting your campus passion with community
Presenters:
Margit Hentschel
Category:
Service Learning
Date:
Tuesday, January 15th 2013
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
210 LSC
Description:
This session will focus on service-learning as a form of active, engaged learning & teaching. Topics will include; 1)exploring your passion to align with service-learning opportunities, 2)examples of how to connect campus & local/global community partnerships, and 3)tools on how to incorporate - or expand - a service-learning component into your existing work. This session will be facilitated as an engaged learning circle and will involve audience participation.
Goals and Target Audience:
Any participant interested in campus/community service-teaching and learning programs either as a volunteer or in curriculum development and experiential learning.

Wednesday, January 16th

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Whatever Happened to the United States Adoption of the Metric System?
Presenters:
Donald Hillger
Category:
Personal/Professional Enrichment
Date:
Wednesday, January 16th 2013
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
210 LSC
Description:
Metric is inevitable for the United States! History tells us that countries have only switched to metric, none the other way (except for temporary reversions). The U.S. remains in the midst of its metric transition as measurement changes are made in various sectors of the economy. Therefore, this information is especially important for teachers/instructors, who should also know our metric history and its current status. The U.S. “missed the boat” in the 1970s when the rest of the English-speaking world converted to metric. That was a time when the metric system was being taught in schools, and metric was intended to replace our former units in most aspects of daily life. However, the lack of firm deadlines for conversion has hindered progress towards metric. Therefore, the U.S. remains the only major industrial nation not using the metric system. The voluntary (slow) path that the U.S. chose to follow is why we are still struggling with metric transition. Most people are surprised when they learn of the large number of consumer products, services, and standards that already use metric units, but that are mostly hidden to the average/casual observer.
Goals and Target Audience:
This lecture presents the current status of the metric system adoption by the U.S., where the change is currently taking place, and where it will likely take place in the future. Most Americans do not realize the extent of metric usage in the world, how widely metric is already used in the U.S., and that metric is inevitable for the U.S. Faculty and staff - as teachers, instructors, and leaders - should be knowledgeable of the history and status of the U.S. transition to metric. This PowerPoint lecture, with imbedded humor, explains what resources are available to help them, and it encourages participants to support the metric transition of the U.S.