Program for the 2013 PDI

Monday, January 14th

11:00 AM

Session Title:
Promoting Academic Integrity: Should CSU move to an Honor Code system?
Presenters:
Elaine Green,Jade Cowan
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 14th 2013
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
211E LSC
Description:
Recently CSU adopted an Honor Pledge as a tool for promoting a culture of academic integrity at our university. A university Honor Pledge is one component of Honor Code systems that traditionally thrive in private universities but are recently appearing as modified systems in public universities. In this session we will discuss the advantages of different systems for encouraging student responsibility for academic integrity and look at results from a recent survey of “best practices” in universities such as CSU. Those who have previously been at Honor Code schools will be encouraged to share their perceptions of the effectiveness of that system. Participants will be polled about their opinion for what direction CSU should pursue as we look to our future and how to best fashion student and faculty responsibilities for academic integrity.
Goals and Target Audience:
Faculty and other instructional staff, and graduate students pursuing a career in academia are encouraged to join in this discussion. The session’s goals are: • To provide an understanding of the difference between “Conduct Code”, “Honor Code”, and “Modified Honor Code” systems for promoting and adjudicating issues of academic integrity. • To present data on the effectiveness of each system for promoting academic integrity and for discouraging academic misconduct among students. • To present data about how other Universities structure honor code systems, honor councils, appeal processes, reporting lines, and support services for academic integrity. • To gather opinions as to how CSU should structure a system if we move to an Honor Code.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
You have a what living in your residence hall? The changing definition and uses of the service animals on campus
Presenters:
John Malsam,Karin Bright,Kathleen Ivy
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Monday, January 14th 2013
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
50 Minutes
Room:
211E LSC
Description:
Ever see a student with an animal on campus? Ever see them inside a building? Ever wonder why? ever wonder if they can do that? Dogs, cats, iguanas, tarantulas, and other animals may have more of a place in the lives and lifestyles of our students than we may be aware. And the University may need to provide opportunities for these animals to be a more welcome part of student lives on-campus. The frequently evolving, and sometimes conflicting, federal guidelines that help define accommodations for students to have & use service & support animals have presented challenges to some colleges and universities. In an effort to keep open this particular route of access to an education here at CSU, this session will explore what those guidelines are and how CSU services have been working to respond. Representatives from Resources for Disabled Students and Housing & Dining Services will share their perspectives and plans for supporting students through the process and, hopefully, finding a successful experience at CSU.
Goals and Target Audience:
=To provide legal and procedural guidelines that could impact interactions with students within the campus community. =Offer insights to observations faculty & staff may be making when they observe students with service and/or support animals. =Help staff & faculty address concerns they may have when working with students who have service and/or support animals

Wednesday, January 16th

10:00 AM

Session Title:
Equal Access through Affirmative Action in Employment and Education: Historical Perspective and Present Reality
Presenters:
Diana Prieto,Nick Cummings
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Wednesday, January 16th 2013
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour, 50 Minutes
Room:
211E LSC
Description:
Access to education is often taken for granted in our society, but historically the opportunity to become educated was closed to many. Following U.S. Supreme Court decisions, equal access to public elementary through high school education was administered with the help of law enforcement. In response to similar discrimination keeping members of our society from employment opportunities, a 1965 Presidential Executive Order mandated that federal contractors, entities conducting business with the federal government (including CSU), take “affirmative action” intended to provide equal employment access for qualified individuals. Since then, affirmative action has also come to describe efforts to provide equal access to education for people who might not otherwise be admitted. Throughout its history, affirmative action has been a controversial and debated practice. This controversy stems from both philosophical disagreements and misunderstandings about its intent and practical implementation. This session will explore the inception and history of affirmative action; its adoption in employment and adaptation by educational institutions; the myths that still surround affirmative action; and the future of affirmative action in light of the U.S. Supreme Court hearing a new challenge in the fall of 2012.
Goals and Target Audience:
All interested university community members are invited to take part in this discussion of the current state of affirmative action and equal opportunity in employment and university admissions.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Sexual Assault Awareness, Advance study
Presenters:
Karl Swenson
Category:
Safety and Health
Date:
Wednesday, January 16th 2013
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
2 Hours, 50 Minutes
Room:
211E LSC
Description:
Will briefly refresh participants' basic understanding of sexual assault issues and information before focusing on more advanced issues affecting victims and survivors of sexual violence. The class will help participants understand what perpetuates the crime of sexual assault; it will open a window on offenders and why they do what they do. The workshop will also cover victims and why they respond to the crime in different ways. The last topic will be the sexual assault laws in Colorado and how they affect victims and suspects.
Goals and Target Audience:
The goal of the class will be to increase general public knowledge about the issues surrounding sexual assault. The class will provide knowledge and skills to faculty and staff who have family, friends, or colleagues who may someday be affected by sexual assault. The curriculum will also address rumors and myths that surround the crime of sexual assault. The audience is all University faculty, staff, and students.