Program for the 2014 PDI

Monday, January 13th

9:45 AM

Session Title:
“Reaction Discussions”: Encouraging Critical Thinking about Readings in On-Line and In-Class Small Groups
Presenters:
Ashley Harvey
Category:
Critical Thinking
Date:
Monday, January 13th 2014
Start Time:
9:45 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
A102 Clark Building
Description:
I will present an innovative teaching technique: an online and in-class “Reaction Discussion” format that I have successfully used in over 25 large undergraduate and small graduate or undergraduate courses. Reaction Discussions promote student engagement by encouraging critical thinking and structuring small and large group discussions. In these reaction discussions, students are assigned alternating roles as primary or secondary reactors. Primary reactors post a reaction to the readings (i.e., what they agreed with/disagreed with; what was new or memorable) on RamCT prior to coming to class, and secondary reactors come to class prepared to respond to the primary reactors and continue the conversation that was started on-line. In this session, I will describe the procedures/forms for implementing Reaction Discussions in large or small undergraduate or graduate courses. In addition, attendees will have the opportunity to participate in a mock Reaction Discussion.
Goals and Target Audience:
To provide instructors of large undergraduate (~100 students or less) or small graduate/undergraduate classes with a tool to encourage critical thinking and small group discussion about required readings.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Imagination in teaching and learning
Presenters:
Matthew Hickey,Christine Schaefer
Category:
Critical Thinking
Date:
Monday, January 13th 2014
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
107 Behavioral Sciences Building
Description:
This session will discuss how the imagination can be incorporated into the teaching and learning process. While a common theme of the intentional exercise of the "moral imagination" as a teaching tool will form the core of the discussion, we will also share examples of the utility of invoking/exercising the imagination to illustrate key content in any class. The instructors experience comes primarily from teaching bioethics, human physiology, and metabolism. However, the larger theme; "How can the teaching-learning environment be enhanced by specific and intentional exercises that invoke the imagination?" will be explored.
Goals and Target Audience:
1. Develop an understanding of the moral imagination as a tool to facilitate learning. 2. Illustrate how invocation of the imaginative faculty in any course setting can both engage students and enhance the teaching-learninig environment. 3. Share specific examples of the use of imagination in the context of sharing course/discipline-specific content. Targeted Audience: Faculty and graduate students in any discipline.