Program for the 2014 PDI

Monday, January 13th

8:30 AM

Session Title:
Incivility in the Classroom: Did you really just do that?
Presenters:
Craig Chesson
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 13th 2014
Start Time:
8:30 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
103 Behavioral Sciences Building
Description:
Have you witnessed an increase of incivility in your classroom? If so, you are not alone. Because of national discourse regarding safety on college campuses, faculty and staff seem more conscious of disruptive, threatening, and concerning behaviors. Examples include: use of email, list-serves, or Facebook to verbally attack or slander classmates as well as bullying through the internet or intentional isolation of colleagues on team projects. Reactions to students’ differences can lead to class conflict, impacting a student’s ability to learn and an instructor’s ability to teach. All participants will leave this session with strategies to address difficult situations and promote inclusivity.
Goals and Target Audience:
The primary goal is to learn strategies on managing classroom disruptiveness.

9:45 AM

Session Title:
Exploring Planning and Effectiveness: Enhancing Student Learning
Presenters:
Robert Jones,Laura Jensen,Dave Johnson
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 13th 2014
Start Time:
9:45 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
Computer Classroom 173 Morgan Library
Description:
To assure the quality degree programs, student learning-outcome (SLO) goals must be clearly articulated and then, for each SLO, metrics must be selected and evidence collected to demonstrate how well graduates attain each SLO. This on-going process of assessment is the foundation for continuous quality improvement and demonstration of program quality. The Planning module of Compliance Assist has been selected to replace PRISM as the campus-wide tool for documenting outcomes assessment. In a hands-on computer lab, participants will be able to log into the new system and begin learning how to use it. Discussion will focus on developing SLO goals, assessment plans (who, when, how and where data is collected), and analysis for incorporation of the evidence into academic department program reviews.
Goals and Target Audience:
Department Heads, Academic program assessment coordinators, and faculty members.

11:00 AM

Session Title:
Living Democracy in the Classroom: Changing the Approach
Presenters:
Karen Rowe, Ph.D.,Elizabeth Urban, Ph.D.
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 13th 2014
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
105 TILT Building
Description:
The presenters will share the work they do collaboratively with their students and the work accomplished over the past five years in the graduate teacher licensure program. The program is a cohort model, professional development school housed at Fossil Ridge High School, in partnership with Colorado State University. The program has, as its foundation, the Four-Part Mission of the Agenda for Education in a Democracy developed by the National Network for Educational Renewal. The work focuses on the ideals of democracy, social justice and equity as the center of instructional planning and teacher preparation. It is a core belief of the partnership that students can attain those necessary skills and dispositions only by living democracy every day in the classroom. The ongoing effort began with the pre-service teachers writing daily democracy objectives as well as daily content and literacy objectives. The addition of objectives addressing democratic skills and dispositions resulted in revised unit and lesson planning templates which frame the experience of learning content in a democratic setting. The planning for creating democratic settings must be thoughtful and intentional. One student’s work including unit and lesson planning is featured in this presentation, and is an example of changing the approach. This is a practical way of living democracy in the classroom while acquiring 21st Century Skills. The templates place democracy and social justice at the center of planning, teaching and assessing. The presenters will share this approach and invite discussion.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goal - to implement a lesson plan template which focuses on living and experiencing democracy in every classroom every day for the purpose of enhancing equity and social justice. The audience is all educators Pre K to 20.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Mindfulness Skills for the Classroom
Presenters:
Debora Colbert
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 13th 2014
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
C142 Clark Building
Description:
Recent clinical research on mindfulness practices has shown benefits that may offer an increased ability to transform stress, improve mental clarity, and help with concentration. This session is designed to explore mindfulness meditation and supportive yoga breath for your daily life both in and out of the classroom. The session will begin with an overview of the multiple physical and mental health benefits, offer background on mindfulness and yoga breath practice, discuss strategies for the classroom, and engage participants in "hands-on" practice of these techniques. Audience participation will be invited in a "learning circle" format. A "start where you are" philosophy is embraced and no previous experience is required. Practice sessions will range from 5-15 minutes, followed with time to share experiences and learn from each other.
Goals and Target Audience:

2:15 PM

Session Title:
Spicing things up: Creating an environment of energy, enthusiasm, and entrancement that captures and retains student attention
Presenters:
Diana Sanchez
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 13th 2014
Start Time:
2:15 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
A103 Clark Building
Description:
We have all likely experienced that lull in the classroom where it seems like nothing we do can capture student's attention and bring them back to the topic at hand. Many educators have discussed and published a variety of tools, techniques, and activities that can be used to help retain student attention (Eden, 2008). This presentation will outline and synthesize several ideas that can be used both inside and outside the classroom to create an environment full of energy. Some of these tips will help you stay energized as the instructor and others will help energize the students so that they will want to stay tuned into the content.
Goals and Target Audience:
-Talk about the common problems instructors face with keeping students engaged -Share ideas on how to promote attention -Give examples and tips on how to recapture student attention -Promote new ways of designing a presentation that will keep students engaged with the content

3:30 PM

Session Title:
Using Organizational Theories to Improve Student Outcomes
Presenters:
Janet Weidert
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 13th 2014
Start Time:
3:30 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
105 Behavioral Sciences Building
Description:
How do we foster positive student outcomes? This presentation will leverage research from the field of organizational psychology to explain how teachers can help improve both attitudinal and performance outcomes in their students. First, we will discuss how college professors can incorporate transformational leadership behaviors into their teaching style. Second, we will apply goal-setting theory to the class setting, with a focus on how students can benefit from setting smart goals. The focus of both applications will be on creating specific, actionable behaviors that teachers can easily adapt to their own class.
Goals and Target Audience:

Tuesday, January 14th

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Student Success Initiatives: What's Been Achieved; What's Next?
Presenters:
Alan Lamborn,Paul Thayer
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 14th 2014
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
2 Hours
Room:
Clark A104
Description:
This fall, the University reported the highest retention, persistence, and graduation rates it has ever achieved. These indicators of increasing student success are important milestones along the path the University embarked on seven years ago, but much remains to be done if we are to achieve the University’s goals for the 2020-2025 period. The session will review the centrality of the undergraduate learning experience in the aims, strategies, and outcomes that are collectively called the "Student Success Initiatives.” The session will also provide an opportunity for participants to discuss and propose next steps.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goals: Share information about the Student Success Initiatives and engage participants in a discussion of next steps for increasing and deepening student engagement in curricular and co-curricular learning. Audience: All members of the university community

3:15 PM

Session Title:
Deepening Student Learning through Peer Education
Presenters:
Heather Landers,Darrie Burrage
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 14th 2014
Start Time:
3:15 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
107 Behavioral Sciences Building
Description:
Do you want your students to spend more time outside of class engaging with course material? Know your students would learn more deeply if they taught the material to someone else? The Institute for Learning and Teaching offers two programs, TILT Study Groups, and The Arts & Sciences Tutoring program, with the goal of hosting a space where students work together in small groups, grapple with difficult course concepts, and teach one another material with a peer educator available to assist when needed. Visit TILT on any weeknight between 5-10 pm, and you will see students engaged in their courses and peer educators whose goal is to get students to collaborate with one another, to understand how to approach problems, and to model the problem-solving skills needed in college-level coursework. If you have been thinking that the students in your course could benefit from having a peer educator available, this is the session for you. We will share the results of our recent program evaluation, talk about our training program, how we work with faculty, and encourage you to think about how you might use peer educators in your courses in collaboration with TILT.
Goals and Target Audience:
Target audience: faculty and instructors Goals: to talk with faculty about how they might collaborate with TILT to offer peer education oopportunities to their students To share more about the impact that peer education is having at CSU

Wednesday, January 15th

8:30 AM

Session Title:
Attracting Student Attention with Magnets and Flipping
Presenters:
Jennifer Taylor
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 15th 2014
Start Time:
8:30 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
105 TILT Building
Description:
Many science students are "hands-on" learners, but designing such activities for large lecture classes is extremely difficult. We have developed a teaching tool that allows students to carry out gene expression and protein translation by manipulating magnets representing mRNA, tRNA, ribosomes and amino acids. In addition, I will discuss how we use classroom flipping to help prepare the students for this activity and clicker quizzing to assess whether learning takes place. Audience members will be invited to participate in this activity and take the clicker quiz.
Goals and Target Audience:
My goal is to demonstrate a new learning tool that can be used in large classes and that can be adapted to almost any topic. The targeted audience is anyone who is interested in active learning in the classroom.

9:45 AM

Session Title:
Online Learning: Organization is the Key
Presenters:
Leann Kaiser
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 15th 2014
Start Time:
9:45 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
C142 Clark Building
Description:
It is becoming more common for educators to be asked to teach their courses and content in a distance format and for learners to be asked to complete their learning online. Many have previously only taught or learned in a face-to-face format. As well, they are often given few if any resources to help them transition their materials and teaching and learning methods online. Thus, the task of moving instruction online can be overwhelming. Although there are excellent resources and research available on best practices for online education, educators and learners often need a few key ideas and techniques to simply begin this daunting transition. One of the items that can have a dramatic affect on the success of an online course is creating an organized learning environment. This session will focus on explaining why organization is so important and how to achieve it in online learning settings.
Goals and Target Audience:
This content of this session will be useful for educators who facilitate or design teaching experiences online as well as for learners in online settings. The content may be particularly relevant for those new to online teaching or learning as they try to determine the most important items to focus on to help them transition into this learning environment. But, those who already have experience in online education will also benefit by being introduced to techniques and information that will help them enhance their current situation or address difficulties they may be facing. Participants attending this session will achieve three outcomes. First, they will understand why organization is so important to successful online learning. Second, they will be given practical and applicable information on how to achieve organization in both course design and facilitation. For those who are learners, this applicable information will be oriented toward the organizational factors learners need to achieve. Third, session participants will be encouraged to transfer what they have learned in this session into their own teaching and learning settings.

11:00 AM

Session Title:
Student Autonomy in the Classroom
Presenters:
Hillary Wehe,Diana Sanchez,Janet Peters
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 15th 2014
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
105 Behavioral Sciences Building
Description:
As instructors we strive to engage students in class material and subject matter. Typically, we share a common goal that students will become interested and want to independently explore the material outside of class time. This independent exploration ideally will lead to the students' ability to master the course material and they will continue to grow and challenge themselves.These broad goals for students have been researched in terms of their intrinsic motivation to engage in learning, their autonomy and perceived control for their learning, and additionally how their instructors encouragement of autonomy can improve long-term learning outcomes. Black and Deci (1999) observed relationships between classroom performance and 1) students' incoming autonomy and interest in course material, as well as, 2) whether they believed their instructor supported autonomy in learning. Higher feelings of autonomy were related overall to better class performance. Additionally, when instructors were viewed as more autonomous, students were able to increase their own feelings of competence and autonomy towards the material which resulted in improved performance. Froiland et al. (2012) demonstrated that interventions with parenting style were successful in creating more autonomous learning in young children. In order to explore how instructors at the college level can support and increase levels of autonomy, we are proposing a panel presentation of four broad topics that we believe can assist instructors. These include: 1) What is intrinsic motivation? 2) Student learning goals 3) Engagement 4) Student choice and increased competence
Goals and Target Audience:
1) What is intrinsic motivation? 2) Student learning goals 3) Engagement 4) Student choice and increased competence

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Course Design: What Video Game Creators Know about Learning
Presenters:
Marcus Viney
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 15th 2014
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
103 Eddy Hall
Description:
My session is devoted to the idea that teachers and course designers have something to learn from video game creators. As teachers, we know that course design is intimately connected to student achievement. When a course makes sense and the parts fit together well, students are much more likely to thrive. But we don't always practice what we preach. Sometimes, for example, we ask students to do something that we haven't exactly prepared them to do. This is where video game creators can offer an insightful analogy. Video games are often carefully designed to prepare players to beat a final boss by allowing players to playfully practice the required skills in prior levels. My suggestion is that, if we stop to consider the way video game creators design for their players, we might learn something about how to create more optimal learning environments for our students. To make this analogy clear, I will walk participants through one unit of my composition class that was inspired by these ideas.
Goals and Target Audience:
While my target audience is instructors of skills-based courses, such as composition, logic, painting, math, etc., instructors of content-based courses might be interested as well. My goal is for teachers to walk away with a few concrete ideas about how to more effectively design courses based on the analogy of how video games are created.

2:15 PM

Session Title:
Electronic Thesis/Dissertation Requirements and Submissions
Presenters:
Cindy Befus,Dawn Paschal
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 15th 2014
Start Time:
2:15 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
102 Eddy Hall
Description:
The Colorado State University Libraries and the Graduate School have developed a submission, approval, and archival process for electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) at Colorado State University. All theses and dissertations are submitted electronically to ProQuest/UMI and Digital Collections of Colorado, CSU’s shared digital repository. This session will cover formatting requirements, steps to create the ETD, and the ETD submission process. It will also cover copyright and embargo information.
Goals and Target Audience:
Review ETD requirements and processes for graduate coordinators and departmental staff who work with graduate students and faculty.
Session Title:
How to motivate your research lab trainees without micromanaging
Presenters:
Deborah Garrity
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 15th 2014
Start Time:
2:15 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
107 Eddy Hall
Description:
Mentoring intelligent trainees in the research lab is both stimulating and demanding. This session is a conversation about factors that motivate or hinder our trainees, and how the mentor can provide effective leadership to help people move forward with their projects. The focus is on practical and upbeat ways to help motivate trainees. Bring your tips, anecdotes and experiences to share.
Goals and Target Audience:
Faculty and mentors in a leadership position in the science research lab.
Session Title:
The Current State of Student Academic Misconduct at CSU: Can We Do Better?
Presenters:
Elaine Green,Shawn Archibeque,Craig Chesson,Carole Makela
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 15th 2014
Start Time:
2:15 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
C144 Clark Building
Description:
In this session the current data on reported student academic misconduct will be shared via the rollout of the CSU Academic Integrity Annual Report. The report will look at who cheats and who reports, as well as how incidents were resolved last year. Members of the TILT Honor Code Task Force will discuss the group's deliberations and conclusions about what institutional steps would further reduce student cheating at CSU.
Goals and Target Audience:
This session is designed to inform the CSU community of the status of student academic integrity and the possibilities for improving our systems. Members of the faculty, staff, and student task force that meet through Spring of 2013 will share their perspectives and conclusions made by looking through the lens of schools that have adopted a student Honor Code.