Program for the 2015 PDI

Monday, January 12th

9:45 AM

Session Title:
First-Year Seminars: For What?
Presenters:
Darrie Burrage,Mark Brown,Heather Matthews,Latoya Noel,Michelle Wellman
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 12th 2015
Start Time:
9:45 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
324 LSC
Description:
Many departments and programs across campus offer a first-year seminar course. While some departments are hesitant to offer such a course, some have fully embraced the potential of what this course could offer to students. This session seeks to explore both the benefits and drawbacks of offering first-year seminar courses by addressing the following questions: How should we approach the curriculum of a seminar course? What could this type of course achieve for students in terms of their academic and personal growth? What challenges might students and departments encounter by offering such a course? What sorts of resources does it take to build a successful seminar course? These questions will be addressed in the form of brief panelist presentations, as well as whole-group discussions. The goal of the session is for participants to be exposed to a variety of pedagogical standpoints reflecting the experiences we seek to foster for first-year students at CSU.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goal: For participants to be exposed to a variety of pedagogical standpoints reflecting the experiences we seek to foster for first-year students at CSU. Target Audience: Instructors and Staff

11:00 AM

Session Title:
Supporting Students AFTER Your Course is Over
Presenters:
Darrell Fontane
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 12th 2015
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
310 LSC
Description:
This session will explore ideas for ways to support students after a course is over. During a course, learning material is usually provided either as handouts or on a class RamCT website. However, after the course is over the RamCT website is no longer available and handout material might be lost. The session will explore the question of whether material should be provided beyond a course and if so what material should be made available and what technologies might be used to do this. Examples of shared course material that go beyond a specific course session will be presented.
Goals and Target Audience:
Course instructors

1:00 PM

Session Title:
PSYCH Up Your Course: How General Psychology Principles Apply To College Classrooms
Presenters:
Andrew Ogle,Angela Martin,Diana Sanchez,Hillary Wehe,Nate Douda,Sara Dieterich and Karla Gingerich
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 12th 2015
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
300 LSC
Description:
General Psychology students learn basic principles of human behavior and mental processes, many of which can be applied readily in the college classroom. In this session, teachers of CSU's General Psychology course will review many such principles and their applications for instructors and students, including topics such as emotion, memory, motivation, perception, consciousness, development, and social influence.
Goals and Target Audience:
Faculty and Graduate Student Teachers

2:15 PM

Session Title:
Academic Integrity: Then and Now at CSU.
Presenters:
Elaine Green
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 12th 2015
Start Time:
2:15 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
312 LSC
Description:
We will look at and discuss trends in student cheating at CSU, including the data collected last February when over 4000 students were surveyed. We have data from 1991 and 2007-08 as well so we can construct longitudinal patterns.
Goals and Target Audience:
Faculty and other Instructors

3:30 PM

Session Title:
Teaching like a Scientist: Is it necessary to kill the sage on the stage?
Presenters:
Paul Laybourn,Aaron Sholders
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 12th 2015
Start Time:
3:30 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
310 LSC
Description:
The session facilitators will explain the need for change in how we traditionally teach large science lecture courses and the published evidence for better alternatives. We will then describe scientific or evidence-based teaching and student-based learning outcomes driven course design and contrast it with content-based course design. We will discuss the process of developing active learning activities focusing on: 1. Learning outcomes/objectives (backward design based on Bloom’s taxonomy) 2. Assessing the effectiveness of these activities (how to tell if you are improving learning outcomes) 3. How to infuse active learning activities into your classes (examples of different approaches and how to implement them)
Goals and Target Audience:
Disseminate evidence-based teaching practices, and use them: • To enhance the quality of science education at CSU • To help increase the CSU scientific community diversity • To continue transforming science education at CSU. People who attend this session should be able to: a. Describe the process of scientific teaching. b. Define learning objectives. c. Define summative and formative assessment and begin to understand how and when to use these to test student learning. d. Properly identify verbs/words with Bloom’s taxonomy. e. Define “active learning” and state its importance in the future of education. f. Be motivated to develop a scientific approach to their teaching. g. Be motivated to develop new ways to engage students in the classroom. Targeted to faculty, instructors, postdocs and graduate students from all disciplines, especially the STEM disciplines interested in alternatives to content driven course design and straight lecture based delivery.

Tuesday, January 13th

8:30 AM

Session Title:
Our Legacy of Learning
Presenters:
Darrie Burrage,Gwen Gorzelsky,Alan Lamborn,Mike Palmquist
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 13th 2015
Start Time:
8:30 AM
Session Length:
2 Hours
Room:
382 LSC
Description:
Universities are environments where what has been called “higher learning” is fostered. This sentiment could be perceived as enlightening or entirely obscure, and its application either fully embraced or arguably lost. Thinking further on this note we encounter the following questions: How do we define higher learning at CSU? What are the critical competencies and skills we would like students to develop at the university? What can happen in our classrooms and through our programming efforts that can create an environment that fosters learning? Lastly, what can CSU be known for in terms of the academic experience we seek to cultivate here? By addressing these questions in small-group discussions, session participants will be involved in building the educational “trademark” of our institution. In other words, we hope to together arrive at a proposed vision for CSU’s legacy of learning.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goal: Share ideas concerning the formation of CSU's academic reputation Target Audience: Instructors and Staff

10:45 AM

Session Title:
I think someone cheated in my class: what do I do now?
Presenters:
Elaine Green,Lindy Cartrite
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 13th 2015
Start Time:
10:45 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
324 LSC
Description:
It is nearly inevitable that the day will come when you suspect that a student has cheated in your course. This session will review the CSU procedures for faculty and other instructors, noting the basic requirements laid out in the Faculty and Administrative Professionals Manual. We will also share what happens when instructors send a student to the Office of Conflict Resolution and Student Conduct Services for a hearing or just for documentation. On-line tools will also be described.
Goals and Target Audience:
Faculty and other Instructors

3:15 PM

Session Title:
O is for Open: Open Educational Resources (OER) in Teaching and Learning
Presenters:
Merinda McLure
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 13th 2015
Start Time:
3:15 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
376-78 LSC
Description:
This session will provide a what? why? and how? introduction to Open Educational Resources (OER) and their consideration, use, and impact in higher education.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goals: 1. Participants will gain a what? why? and how? understanding of Open Educational Resources (OER) in higher education. 2. Participants will have an opportunity to react and respond through group discussion. 3. Participants will be introduced to resources for their own further exploration of OER. This session will be of interest to all who teach, to graduate teaching assistants, and to graduate students who plan to teach in the future.
Session Title:
TILT Course Quality
Presenters:
Dave Johnson,Christianne Magee,Sean Burns,Katie Lyon
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 13th 2015
Start Time:
3:15 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
382 LSC
Description:
What is TILT “course quality”? What is TILT “assessment”? Both of these terms have been used interchangeably during the past three semesters while TILT has grappled with the goal of assessing learning outcomes and online and residential course quality for two TILT programs: Online Course Development and the Provost's Course Re-Design Competition/Learning Ecologies. TILT assessment tracks a variety of indicators of course quality and successful learning outcomes through a mixed-methods approach to data collection and analysis for the purposes of evaluating the effectiveness of these two programs, in addition to giving faculty vital information about their courses. The purpose of this panel will be to discuss some of the challenges, highlights, discoveries, and new directions for the assessment program at TILT. Presenting are TILT's assessment team and a faculty member from Biomedical Sciences. Presenters will give a 40-minute presentation followed by facilitated Q&A/discussion.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goals include providing information to interested faculty and administrators about this new program at TILT, as well as eliciting feedback on methods and potential directions of TILT Assessment.

Wednesday, January 14th

9:45 AM

Session Title:
Creating “Desirable Conflict” in the Classroom
Presenters:
Darrie Burrage,Mark Benn,Cori Wong,Cindy Griffin
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 14th 2015
Start Time:
9:45 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
310 LSC
Description:
The classes we teach often include tough topics we deem as important in terms of enabling students to grasp the overall curriculum of the course. Tough topics can include conversations on race, gender, socioeconomic class, and environmental sustainability. Bringing these difficult conversations into the classroom presents a particular set of challenges. Questions we must consider include: How can we create classroom environments where all students feel they have a stake in the topic at hand? Simply stated, how can we encourage students to care? This session seeks to posit a response to these questions by sharing various methods of creating “desirable conflict” in the classroom. Desirable conflict will be defined as engaging in topics in ways that promote enough discomfort for students to feel invested, but not enough discomfort where students feel overwhelmed and disengaged from the topic. By using brief talks from panelists to establish the session’s foundation, attendees will be involved in a whole-group discussion where we will share different pedagogical concepts and practices that can take our in-class conversations to the next level of depth, and to the next level of community.
Goals and Target Audience:
- Goals: Share strategies on facilitating tough conversations in class, and those strategies be ones that solicit high student engagement. - Target Audience: Instructors and Staff

11:00 AM

Session Title:
Teaching Effectiveness and Excellence in a Changing Campus Environment
Presenters:
Dave Johnson,Jerry Vaske,Michele Marquitz
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 14th 2015
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
105 TILT Building
Description:
Join the lead researchers in a discussion about the evaluation of teaching in Human Dimensions of Natural Resources (HDNR). Questions addressed (and still being entertained) include: What is excellent teaching? What is effective teaching? What indicates either category? Can these measures be quantified? Or, should any honest evaluation put more emphasis in qualitative data? Should instructors (or departments) put any stock in course evaluations, or peer observations, or grades? The presenters will offer a short review of the scholarship on teaching excellence and effectiveness, discuss new initiatives in HDNR to evaluate teaching, and host a guided discussion with attendees about problems and possibilities when evaluating teaching.
Goals and Target Audience:
Audience will consist of faculty primarily and administrators second. Goals include informing the audience of initiatives to successfully and fairly evaluate teaching and to gather feedback from the campus community.

3:15 PM

Session Title:
Understanding Autism Spectrum Disorders and Promising Instructional Approaches
Presenters:
Cynthia Tate,Megan Wolff
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 14th 2015
Start Time:
3:15 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
310 LSC
Description:
According to the Center for Disease Control’s latest stats (March 28, 2014) on the prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) among children aged 8 years, one in 68 now have some type of ASD. Many of whom are those with higher functioning Autism or Asperger’s Syndrome who are matriculating to higher education and will continue to at increasing rates. This presentation provides insight on what ASDs are, relates common strengths and challenges associated with this population; and, shares emerging instructional approaches that assist learning while improving retention and graduation rates for all students.
Goals and Target Audience:
Target Audience: Instructors, GTAs Goals: 1. Audience participants will gain an understanding of what Autism Spectrum Disorders are and what they are not. 1.1. ASDs defined 1.2. Growing numbers and how this impacts institutes of higher education 1.3. Dispelling myths associated with ASDs 1.4. Common strengths and challenges as related to academics and campus life 1.5. The many variances: a couple case studies 2. Participants will learn some of the emerging instructional approaches that foster learning and growth for students with Asperger’s while also benefiting all students. 2.1. Importance of structure: syllabus, assignments, expectations, procedures, guidelines, changes in routine 2.2. Emotional climate: reducing stress/anxiety- triggers, one-on-one check in, preparation 2.3. Environmental factors: lighting, positioning, stimuli – sights and sounds 2.4. Promoting successful group teaching/learning experiences 2.5. Encouraging self-advocacy, a key indicator of success. 3. Participants will be informed of campus and online available resources.