Program for the 2015 PDI

Monday, January 12th

9:45 AM

Session Title:
Providing Video Feedback to Students Digitally
Presenters:
Zachary Hutchins
Category:
General Technology Issues
Date:
Monday, January 12th 2015
Start Time:
9:45 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
310 LSC
Description:
This session will present evidence that undergraduate students at CSU prefer to receive video feedback on papers, projects, and presentations, rather than the traditional handwritten end note. Presenters will be introduced to technologies--both through Canvas and commercially distributed software--that make offering video feedback to students both efficient and easy. Participants who choose to bring laptops will be able to walk through the process of creating and sharing brief videos in real time; participants will also discuss the educational benefits and potential drawbacks to adopting this new method for evaluation and instruction.
Goals and Target Audience:
This presentation is designed for instructors, graduate teaching assistants, and others who grade and provide feedback on student work. Participants will leave with an understanding of the benefits that giving video feedback digitally offers to both students and faculty. Participants will also leave with an understanding of the ways in which Canvas and commercially distributed software can facilitate their decision to give students video feedback.

11:00 AM

Session Title:
Supporting Students AFTER Your Course is Over
Presenters:
Darrell Fontane
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 12th 2015
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
310 LSC
Description:
This session will explore ideas for ways to support students after a course is over. During a course, learning material is usually provided either as handouts or on a class RamCT website. However, after the course is over the RamCT website is no longer available and handout material might be lost. The session will explore the question of whether material should be provided beyond a course and if so what material should be made available and what technologies might be used to do this. Examples of shared course material that go beyond a specific course session will be presented.
Goals and Target Audience:
Course instructors

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Begin the Journey With Canvas – A Tour of CSU’s New Learning Management System
Presenters:
Kevin Nolan,Fran Campana,Nick Leinen
Category:
General Technology Issues
Date:
Monday, January 12th 2015
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
2 Hours
Room:
310 LSC
Description:
In 2015, CSU will upgrade from RamCT Blackboard to Canvas as its online learning management system. Canvas consistently rates highly with both instructors and students for ease of use and reliability. In this session we will discuss when and how to get from RamCT to Canvas and what resources are available to help instructors and students. We will demonstrate how to navigate in Canvas and how users can set notifications to their email account or send messages to social media such as Facebook or Twitter. We will show examples of the two main ways to display content – via pages and modules. We’ll discuss how users can work with a migrated, teaching or demo course to prepare their 2015 course content. And we will save time to answer your questions about this transition.
Goals and Target Audience:
Faculty and staff interested in online course content delivery

3:30 PM

Session Title:
Teaching like a Scientist: Is it necessary to kill the sage on the stage?
Presenters:
Paul Laybourn,Aaron Sholders
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 12th 2015
Start Time:
3:30 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
310 LSC
Description:
The session facilitators will explain the need for change in how we traditionally teach large science lecture courses and the published evidence for better alternatives. We will then describe scientific or evidence-based teaching and student-based learning outcomes driven course design and contrast it with content-based course design. We will discuss the process of developing active learning activities focusing on: 1. Learning outcomes/objectives (backward design based on Bloom’s taxonomy) 2. Assessing the effectiveness of these activities (how to tell if you are improving learning outcomes) 3. How to infuse active learning activities into your classes (examples of different approaches and how to implement them)
Goals and Target Audience:
Disseminate evidence-based teaching practices, and use them: • To enhance the quality of science education at CSU • To help increase the CSU scientific community diversity • To continue transforming science education at CSU. People who attend this session should be able to: a. Describe the process of scientific teaching. b. Define learning objectives. c. Define summative and formative assessment and begin to understand how and when to use these to test student learning. d. Properly identify verbs/words with Bloom’s taxonomy. e. Define “active learning” and state its importance in the future of education. f. Be motivated to develop a scientific approach to their teaching. g. Be motivated to develop new ways to engage students in the classroom. Targeted to faculty, instructors, postdocs and graduate students from all disciplines, especially the STEM disciplines interested in alternatives to content driven course design and straight lecture based delivery.

Wednesday, January 14th

9:45 AM

Session Title:
Creating “Desirable Conflict” in the Classroom
Presenters:
Darrie Burrage,Mark Benn,Cori Wong,Cindy Griffin
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 14th 2015
Start Time:
9:45 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
310 LSC
Description:
The classes we teach often include tough topics we deem as important in terms of enabling students to grasp the overall curriculum of the course. Tough topics can include conversations on race, gender, socioeconomic class, and environmental sustainability. Bringing these difficult conversations into the classroom presents a particular set of challenges. Questions we must consider include: How can we create classroom environments where all students feel they have a stake in the topic at hand? Simply stated, how can we encourage students to care? This session seeks to posit a response to these questions by sharing various methods of creating “desirable conflict” in the classroom. Desirable conflict will be defined as engaging in topics in ways that promote enough discomfort for students to feel invested, but not enough discomfort where students feel overwhelmed and disengaged from the topic. By using brief talks from panelists to establish the session’s foundation, attendees will be involved in a whole-group discussion where we will share different pedagogical concepts and practices that can take our in-class conversations to the next level of depth, and to the next level of community.
Goals and Target Audience:
- Goals: Share strategies on facilitating tough conversations in class, and those strategies be ones that solicit high student engagement. - Target Audience: Instructors and Staff

11:00 AM

Session Title:
Global learning in all disciplines through the means of a foreign language
Presenters:
Frederique Grim,Andrea Purdy
Category:
Curriculum Development
Date:
Wednesday, January 14th 2015
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
310 LSC
Description:
This talk will explain the concept of Culture and Language across the Curriculum (CLAC), a method that enables global learning across disciplines (e.g., business, agriculture, family studies, engineering, biomedical science, business administration) through the use of a foreign language. Students become better prepared linguistically, culturally and professionally for a global market because they are able to talk about their major discipline in the second language. The benefits of developing a specific curriculum with the support of a foreign language have been proven to be very efficient as it provides meaningful and relevant content to learners and opens door to professional opportunities. The presenters will share concrete plans for extending global learning in a variety of disciplines and will seek to work with faculty/departments interested in developing such plans or courses within Colorado State University.
Goals and Target Audience:
• to promote all CSU disciplines through the use of a foreign language, • to show how foreign languages can be relevant and enhance any other curriculum across campus • to strengthen students’ experience and prepare them for a global market and network • to develop a network within CSU that could implement a variety of CLAC models • no foreign language knowledge is necessary to attend this session • Audience: anyone who is interested in internationalizing their discipline to better prepare their students.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Payroll Termination Process Review
Presenters:
Human Resources,Human Resources
Category:
Administrative Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 14th 2015
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
2 Hours
Room:
310 LSC
Description:
Overview of the payroll termination process and related responsibilities. This reviews processes for faculty, administrative professional, graduates, state classified, student hourly and non-student hourly employees and reasons for separation including retirement, resignation, job elimination, involuntary termination, transitional appointments and death.
Goals and Target Audience:
Interested employees; HR representatives

3:15 PM

Session Title:
Understanding Autism Spectrum Disorders and Promising Instructional Approaches
Presenters:
Cynthia Tate,Megan Wolff
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 14th 2015
Start Time:
3:15 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
310 LSC
Description:
According to the Center for Disease Control’s latest stats (March 28, 2014) on the prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) among children aged 8 years, one in 68 now have some type of ASD. Many of whom are those with higher functioning Autism or Asperger’s Syndrome who are matriculating to higher education and will continue to at increasing rates. This presentation provides insight on what ASDs are, relates common strengths and challenges associated with this population; and, shares emerging instructional approaches that assist learning while improving retention and graduation rates for all students.
Goals and Target Audience:
Target Audience: Instructors, GTAs Goals: 1. Audience participants will gain an understanding of what Autism Spectrum Disorders are and what they are not. 1.1. ASDs defined 1.2. Growing numbers and how this impacts institutes of higher education 1.3. Dispelling myths associated with ASDs 1.4. Common strengths and challenges as related to academics and campus life 1.5. The many variances: a couple case studies 2. Participants will learn some of the emerging instructional approaches that foster learning and growth for students with Asperger’s while also benefiting all students. 2.1. Importance of structure: syllabus, assignments, expectations, procedures, guidelines, changes in routine 2.2. Emotional climate: reducing stress/anxiety- triggers, one-on-one check in, preparation 2.3. Environmental factors: lighting, positioning, stimuli – sights and sounds 2.4. Promoting successful group teaching/learning experiences 2.5. Encouraging self-advocacy, a key indicator of success. 3. Participants will be informed of campus and online available resources.