Program for the 2015 PDI

Monday, January 12th

9:45 AM

Session Title:
First-Year Seminars: For What?
Presenters:
Darrie Burrage,Mark Brown,Heather Matthews,Latoya Noel,Michelle Wellman
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 12th 2015
Start Time:
9:45 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
324 LSC
Description:
Many departments and programs across campus offer a first-year seminar course. While some departments are hesitant to offer such a course, some have fully embraced the potential of what this course could offer to students. This session seeks to explore both the benefits and drawbacks of offering first-year seminar courses by addressing the following questions: How should we approach the curriculum of a seminar course? What could this type of course achieve for students in terms of their academic and personal growth? What challenges might students and departments encounter by offering such a course? What sorts of resources does it take to build a successful seminar course? These questions will be addressed in the form of brief panelist presentations, as well as whole-group discussions. The goal of the session is for participants to be exposed to a variety of pedagogical standpoints reflecting the experiences we seek to foster for first-year students at CSU.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goal: For participants to be exposed to a variety of pedagogical standpoints reflecting the experiences we seek to foster for first-year students at CSU. Target Audience: Instructors and Staff

11:00 AM

Session Title:
Big Data: Big Opportunities or Big Trouble?
Presenters:
Shea Swauger,Kathy Partin
Category:
Research
Date:
Monday, January 12th 2015
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
324 LSC
Description:
Big data is changing how research is being conducted and allowing new kinds of questions to be asked. Meanwhile, data management has enabled a rapid increase in the dissemination and preservation of research products and many funding agencies like the National Science Foundation and National Institute of Health now require data management plans in their grant applications. The combination of big data applications and data management processes has created new opportunities and pitfalls for researchers. In the past year, prominent scientists including the Director of the NIH have suggested that inappropriate methodology for data acquisition, analysis and storage has led to a gap in the translation of basic research findings to clinical cures. In this session we will track data through all research stages, describe best practices and university resources available to faculty grappling with these important issues.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goal: Attendees will learn about big data and data management as they relate to research compliance issues in a university setting as well as the resources available to mitigate these issues. Target Audience: faculty, research staff, graduate students or anyone interested in big data, data management or research compliance.

2:15 PM

Session Title:
An Overview of University Sponsored Retirement Benefits and the Process of Retirement
Presenters:
Human Resources
Category:
HR & Employee Concerns
Date:
Monday, January 12th 2015
Start Time:
2:15 PM
Session Length:
2 Hours
Room:
324 LSC
Description:
Human Resources will provide an informative overview of University Sponsored Retirement Plan Benefits coupled with a presentation to facilitate an understanding of the retirement process. It will also provide basic strategies focusing on saving early and developing a steadfast plan for retirement.
Goals and Target Audience:
Interested employees; HR representatives

Tuesday, January 13th

8:30 AM

Session Title:
Flipping the Classroom with Digital Tools
Presenters:
Jaime Jordan,Robert Jordan
Category:
General Technology Issues
Date:
Tuesday, January 13th 2015
Start Time:
8:30 AM
Session Length:
2 Hours
Room:
324 LSC
Description:
This session will introduce the basic features of Rap Genius, Thinglink,Tiki-Toki, and Story Maps -- free, web-based digital tools. Rap Genius and ThingLink enable students to make public or semi-private multimedia annotations to texts (Genius.com) and images (thinglink.com), and Tiki-Toki and Story Maps enable students to produce and share powerful, visual narratives pulled from content across a number of scholarly disciplines. These tools allow students to embed videos, images, and links to articles using an intuitive interface, transforming them from passive consumers of knowledge into active producers and publishers of information.
Goals and Target Audience:
The goal is to give faculty and grad students in the Humanities ideas for flipping the classroom in order to make students knowledge producers rather than passive recipients of knowledge. These tools are useful in classes of 20 or 120, and they allow students to be creative and collaborate on a variety of projects. In addition, these digital tools engage different types of learners.

10:45 AM

Session Title:
I think someone cheated in my class: what do I do now?
Presenters:
Elaine Green,Lindy Cartrite
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 13th 2015
Start Time:
10:45 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
324 LSC
Description:
It is nearly inevitable that the day will come when you suspect that a student has cheated in your course. This session will review the CSU procedures for faculty and other instructors, noting the basic requirements laid out in the Faculty and Administrative Professionals Manual. We will also share what happens when instructors send a student to the Office of Conflict Resolution and Student Conduct Services for a hearing or just for documentation. On-line tools will also be described.
Goals and Target Audience:
Faculty and other Instructors

3:15 PM

Session Title:
From the Heart with Data
Presenters:
Michael Brake,Amy Robertson,Teresa Metzger
Category:
Outreach
Date:
Tuesday, January 13th 2015
Start Time:
3:15 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
324 LSC
Description:
Retaining students is a priority for most, if not all campuses, and fostering students’ sense of belonging and connection to campus is a critical factor in retention. Meaningful and personal interactions with staff help create that connection and residence halls are a great place to start. In this session, presenters will share their experiences working to enable connections through use of a critical conversation informed by data.
Goals and Target Audience:
Any CSU staff member is invited to come talk about Taking Stock - the questions asked to students, and results and how they are used by various populations on campus. 1. Participants in this session will identify methods to encourage students to make connections to their university. 2. Participants in this session will explain the application of data to interactions designed to impact retention. 3. Participants in this session will describe decisions campuses will make regarding crafting questions to gather valid and meaningful data, and to focus discussions for different roles.

Wednesday, January 14th

9:45 AM

Session Title:
"Dear Committee Members": 3 Steps to Mastering Letters of Recommendation
Presenters:
Mary Swanson,Nancy Levinger
Category:
Advising Issues
Date:
Wednesday, January 14th 2015
Start Time:
9:45 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
324 LSC
Description:
In Julie Schumacher's new novel,"Dear Committee members," the protagonist, disgruntled professor Jason Fitger, writes "The LOR has become a rampant absurdity, usurping the place of the quick consultation and the two minute phone call--not to mention the teaching and research that faculty were hired to perform. I haven't published a novel in six years; instead I fill my departmental hours casting words of praise into the bureaucratic abyss." If you, like Fitger, feel that you spend countless hours writing letters of recommendation for students, then this session is for you! We will discuss 3 steps that both reduce the amount of time it takes to write LORs and improve their overall quality. We will also discuss when and how to tell students no. Those who appreciate humor are encouraged to attend.
Goals and Target Audience:
Faculty and Staff

11:00 AM

Session Title:
CSUs NEW Talent Management System - Introductory Session
Presenters:
Chris Mullen,Lyn Martin
Category:
HR & Employee Concerns
Date:
Wednesday, January 14th 2015
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
324 LSC
Description:
Come and learn about CSU's new Talent Management System. This session will introduce the new system to the campus-wide community and show some of the efficiencies that can be gained for your department or unit in the search and hiring process.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goal - to introduce CSU's new Talent Management System to the university campus. This is a campus-wide initiative. Target Audience is anyone who works with searches or takes part in the hiring process.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress
Presenters:
Janelle Patrias
Category:
Safety and Health
Date:
Wednesday, January 14th 2015
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
2 Hours
Room:
324 LSC
Description:
The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health. The faculty version models an effective interaction between a faculty member and a distressed student.The interactive workshop uses a combination of learning modalities to learn how to recognize and respond to a range of mental health issues including suicide. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important.
Goals and Target Audience:
The target audience is faculty members who routinely engage with students and want to be better prepared to assist students in distress. Participants can expect to • observe a realistic filmed scenario of a conversation with a distressed student • engage in self-reflection and dialog • overcome fears, judgments and hesitations in order to help others • learn about response options they can use in their settings • consider campus resources that offer support