Program for the 2017 PDI

Tuesday, January 10th

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Assisting CSU Students Who are Undocumented
Presenters:
Connie Jaime-Lujan,Elias Quinonez,John Henderson,Allie Keller,Wendy True,Dr. Susana Muñoz
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Tuesday, January 10th 2017
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
Half Day
Room:
372-74 LSC
Description:
The 2013 implementation of the State of Colorado’s Advancing Students for a Stronger Economy Tomorrow (ASSET) legislation has made it possible for eligible students who are undocumented to pursue a higher education. This session will highlight how Colorado State University implemented the ASSET legislation and how CSU has been assisting students who are undocumented. The session will cover the following: · The historical, social and political context of how state and federal policies have impacted college access · Important terminology · Resources CSU has implemented to assist students who are undocumented · Student stories highlighting the ways CSU students who are undocumented positively impact our campus Participants will be sent general information before the session.
Goals and Target Audience:
This four-hour training is for anyone who would like to know more about how to assist these students.

Wednesday, January 11th

2:15 PM

Session Title:
Dogs and Rabbits and Snakes—Oh My! Service Dogs and Emotional Support Animals on Campus
Presenters:
Robert Schur,Kathleen Ivy,John Malsam
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Wednesday, January 11th 2017
Start Time:
2:15 PM
Session Length:
2 Hours
Room:
312 LSC
Description:
What is a service dog, exactly, and where can it go on campus? When can a student have an animal in the residence halls? The presence of dogs and other animals on our campus has steadily increased in recent years, and people have questions about what’s allowed and what to do when interacting with people who have animals. Come and learn about the differences between these types of animals under the law, and under CSU’s recently revised policy, and how people and animals can peacefully co-exist on our campus.
Goals and Target Audience:
Learning objectives include: • Understand the difference between a service animal, a pet, and an emotional support or therapy animal • Know the rules that apply to service dogs on campus • Know what animals are allowed in the residence halls, and why • Learn about the resources available to support the campus community’s need to accommodate individuals with disabilities who rely on these animals Targeted Audience: Residence hall staff, building proctors, faculty, and anyone who wants to learn more about these animals and the responsibilities of their owners and the campus community.

3:30 PM

Session Title:
The Skill of Impact
Presenters:
Darrie Matthew Burrage,David D'Alessandro
Category:
Diversity
Date:
2017
Start Time:
3:30 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
312 LSC
Description:
Conversations on topics surrounding social justice often mention a now well-known concept referred to as “intent versus impact.” The heart of this model is that our intentions, no matter how honorable, may result in a negative experience for another. “Intent versus impact” has been a powerful tool for us to arrive at an awareness (or a reminder) of how we significantly affect the experience of those around us – intended or unintended. Although this model has done well in having us, possibly, gain new knowledge, the current conversation on “intent versus impact” has yet to yield guidance on how we can respond to the impacts we experience, witness, or may cause for others. In this practice-based session, we will spend some time expanding our framework of “intent versus impact” to include “response to impact” as a critical component needed for social change. In addition to this expansion, we will practice customized actions that can be taken when impacts occur in our everyday lives.
Goals and Target Audience:
The goals of session include: (1) problematizing popular notions of “intent versus impact”, (2) have participants learn that both awareness (knowledge) and action (skill) are needed for the changes we desire in society and in our everyday relationships, and (3) generate possible actions that could be taken to respond to the impacts we encounter.