Program for the 2017 PDI

Tuesday, January 10th

9:45 AM

Session Title:
Analytics Series, Part 2: Ethical Considerations for Learning Analytics
Presenters:
Dave Johnson,Laura Jensen,Gwen Gorzelsky,James Folkestad
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 10th 2017
Start Time:
9:45 AM
Session Length:
2 Hours
Room:
304-06 LSC
Description:
This series of sessions will inform attendees of recent progress and ongoing projects related to building academic and learning analytics capacity at CSU. Come learn more about the potential of learning analytics to support learning and teaching, as well as about major initiatives behind learning analytics, including efforts to outline an operational ethics and policy, build digital infrastructure, pilot and assess analytics tools, and get faculty involved in learning analytics research through CSU’s new Center for the Analytics of Learning and Teaching (C-ALT). Description of Session: Learning analytics is often discussed in terms of technical capability and technical expertise. For example, it relies on capabilities such as long-term data storage, the use of statistical analyses and machine algorithms, the use of web-based reporting tools and data visualizations, and more. Questions about technical expertise are often focused on whether or not we can or could. However, the conversation should also address should and how. In other words, how do we advance ethical considerations for learning analytics in pace, or even ahead of, the conversation about whether or not we can do learning analytics? Those who attend this session should expect a brief, but comprehensive presentation on the ethical considerations related to learning analytics that intends to answer the following questions: What are ethical considerations for learning analytics? How does a conversation about ethics inform campus projects and policy? How are those who are spearheading analytics efforts also making progress with ethics? The presentation will be followed by small group break-out sessions for focused discussion, and attendees will be provided resources for further reading and study.
Goals and Target Audience:
After attending this session, faculty members, administrators, and support staff should be able to hold an informed discussion about ethical considerations for the use of learning analytics.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Open Textbooks: Opportunities, Considerations, and Faculty Experience
Presenters:
Merinda McLure,Meg Brown-Sica,James Wilson
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 10th 2017
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
322 LSC
Description:
Open textbooks are “textbooks that have been funded, published, and licensed to be freely used, adapted, and distributed” (Open Textbook Network, 2016). Their publication and adoption is increasing across academic disciplines in higher education and open textbooks can offer students and instructors a number of benefits. The open licensing of these texts gives individual instructors the flexibility to augment, customize, and update the content. Open textbooks are freely accessible; they can present significant course materials cost savings for students. Because access is open, open textbooks are available to all students from the first day of the course and indefinitely thereafter, facilitating students’ use of open textbooks as resources for subsequent courses and beyond university study. Open textbooks can be used electronically, or printed in part or full, providing instructors and students with multiple format options and the ability to travel light. In this session, Merinda McLure, Open Educational Resources (OER) Librarian, and Meg Brown-Sica, Libraries Assistant Dean for Scholarly Communications and Collection Development will address the what, why, and how of open textbooks in higher education currently. Dr. James Wilson, Assistant Professor, Mathematics will share his experiences and perspectives as a faculty member who has adopted open textbooks for course instruction. This workshop will be especially informative for faculty and instructors who teach, current graduate teaching assistants, and graduate students who hope to teach in the future. We will welcome questions and discussion throughout the session.
Goals and Target Audience:
Target audience: This session will be of interest to faculty and instructors who teach, to graduate teaching assistants, and to graduate students who hope to teach in the future. Goals: 1. Participants will gain an understanding of open textbooks and their current adoption in higher education. 2. Participants will have the opportunity to learn from the experience and insights of one faculty member who has used open textbooks in his course instruction. 3. Participants will depart with resources for their own further exploration of open textbooks and open educational resources (OER).

2:15 PM

Session Title:
Flipped Classroom Research at CSU: What have we learned?
Presenters:
Sean Burns,Brittany Taylor
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Tuesday, January 10th 2017
Start Time:
2:15 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
386 LSC
Description:
CSU has redesigned several classrooms across campus and is building new classrooms that include mobile furniture. Research and Analytics has conducted research over the past two years to determine how classrooms have been used, and what the most effective practices have been. This session will discuss the results of that research and encourage audience discussion about how we should use those results to inform faculty and administration at CSU.
Goals and Target Audience:
Target audience is anyone interested in how classes have been flipped at CSU, and how we can or should incorporate lessons learned moving forward. Our goal is to inform people of what's been working at CSU, and to encourage thoughtful discussion about how to utilize flipped teaching methods at CSU moving forward.
Session Resources:

Wednesday, January 11th

8:30 AM

Session Title:
A Walk Through the New Online Exam Scheduling System at RDS
Presenters:
Amanda Wimmer,Allison Penfield
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 11th 2017
Start Time:
8:30 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
304 LSC
Description:
Resources for Disabled Students (RDS) has moved to a new online exam scheduling system. All students with disabilities are now scheduling their exams at the alternative testing center using this system. This step-by-step tutorial will help guide faculty members and instructors through the exam scheduling process. We will also be able to answer questions you may have regarding the new system and process.
Goals and Target Audience:
Faculty and instructors with students receiving accommodations through Resources for Disabled Students.

9:45 AM

Session Title:
It's not all fun and games, but it could be: The Science of learning and how to integrates games and play into the classroom experience
Presenters:
Diana Sanchez,Pamela Lundeberg,Lauren Bates
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 11th 2017
Start Time:
9:45 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
300 LSC
Description:
Research on the science of learning explores methods and techniques that can be used in the classroom to improve student learning. Three researchers will talk about modern topics of adding games and play to the classroom. They will present current ideas based on research findings and practical applications of what instructors can do to make the classroom more fun while facilitating learning.
Goals and Target Audience:
Present current research on learning methods and provide practical recommendations for instructors.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Honors Early Move-in Program and Welcome Lecture with Dr. Temple Grandin: A lesson in common reading experiences.
Presenters:
Teresa Metzger,Judi Bryandt,Don Mykles
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 11th 2017
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
312 LSC
Description:
The Honors Welcome Lecture with Dr. Temple Grandin was a new program to welcome first year students to the Honors Program at CSU. During Ram Orientation, Honors students were given Dr. Temple Grandin’s book Thinking in Pictures to read before moving on campus. Students were invited to move-in early to their residence hall to participate in this program. After moving into the halls, students participated in small groups with faculty and peer mentors discussing the book. Dr. Temple Grandin delivered an engaging lecture discussing the value of diversity and learning. The next day students participated in a service event at various locations in the Fort Collins area. The program was a huge success and created a foundation for learning and engagement for students and faculty in the Honors Programs. This PDI will provide an overview of the overall effectiveness of the Honors Early Move-in and Welcome Lecture program.
Goals and Target Audience:
• Explore the benefits of a Common Reading Program. • Discuss innovative ways to create academic engagement with students. • The value of collaborative partnerships on campus. Faculty, Administration, Student Affairs
Session Resources:

10:45 AM

Session Title:
Analytics Series, Part 1: What is Learning Analytics? An Introduction for Everyone
Presenters:
Dave Johnson,Laura Jensen,Gwen Gorzelsky,James Folkestad
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
2017
Start Time:
10:45 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
300 LSC
Description:
Series Description: This series of sessions will inform attendees of recent progress and ongoing projects related to building academic and learning analytics capacity at CSU. Come learn more about the potential of learning analytics to support learning and teaching, as well as about major initiatives behind learning analytics, including efforts to outline an operational ethics and policy, build digital infrastructure, pilot and assess analytics tools, and get faculty involved in learning analytics research through CSU’s new Center for the Analytics of Learning and Teaching (C-ALT). Session Description: Learning analytics seems like the latest craze among higher education institutions, but what is learning analytics really? And, how is learning analytics relevant to research, teaching, course design, and student success? Further, what is CSU doing to build capacity for learning analytics? This session will introduce attendees to learning analytics, explain what it is and how it works, discuss case uses of analytics, and introduce attendees to CSU’s three-year draft plan for using learning analytics to improve learning and teaching. Though most of this session will be devoted to presentation, attendees should expect to participate in discussion and ask questions. Attendees will also be introduced to additional resources about this very promising effort.
Goals and Target Audience:
This session is intended to be the cornerstone of the Learning Analytics PDI series. Two main goals for this session include: (1.) faculty members, administrators, and support staff leave with a clear sense of what learning analytics means and what it can do, and (2.) attendees discuss CSU’s three-year plan for building learning analytics capacity.
Session Resources:

3:30 PM

Session Title:
Reflections on an instrument designed to provide quantitative feedback on teaching
Presenters:
Andrew West
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
2017
Start Time:
3:30 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
300 LSC
Description:
To help support faculty in diversifying their teaching styles, we have adopted a published, research-based teaching observation tool that allows for quantitative, non-evaluative feedback that helps faculty members to see themes in their teaching style and prompts reflection regarding ways to make their teaching more dynamic. In this session, I will describe the Teaching Dimensions Observation Protocol instrument (TDOP)(Hora, 2015), train participants on how to use it with an interactive and hands-on approach, and share feedback from our faculty member’s experiences using the instrument with a specific focus on how the TDOP supported instruction better suited for a diverse student population.
Goals and Target Audience:
By the end of the session, participants will be able to: 1) make an argument for the use of the TDOP based on educational research and theory, 2) utilize the TDOP instrument as a peer observer, and 3) cite specific examples of ways the TDOP has made our faculty member’s instruction better suited for a diverse student population.