Program for the 2018 PDI

Monday, January 8th

9:00 AM

Session Title:
Body Modification - Historic Roots to Modern Practices
Presenters:
Stephen Escobar
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Monday, January 8th 2018
Start Time:
9:00 AM
Session Length:
2 Hours
Room:
LSC 378
Description:
Body modification (tattoos, piercings, etc.) have existed within many cultures from around the world since time in memoriam. The reasons for body modification can vary greatly from person to person/culture to culture. It can be cultural rites/traditions, standards of beauty, age based milestones, religious requirements and yes, even just because one can. This presentation will take you back 5,000 years to the oldest known tattooing practice to the modern day. We will discuss a form of diversity that is (typically) self-elected and what that can mean in such a diverse world. The world of body modification is vast so the information from this presentation will hopefully provide you with a general idea of how to understand those who participate in this practice. We will review several tribal traditions as well as newer forms of modification. Questions will be most welcome during this presentation so if you have something that you've been too afraid to ask, this would be a great time to do so.
Goals and Target Audience:
The main goal of this presentation is to expand on understanding this area of diversity. With this ever changing world and the prevalence of the tattooing and body modification industry, I seek to expand people's understanding of what it means to modify oneself externally (and in part, internally); what that may mean culturally, personally or professionally. My target audience is anyone who wishes to have an understanding of these practices and the varying reasons that they are done; whether that be students, current professionals or any others.

Tuesday, January 9th

8:00 AM

Session Title:
Supporting Students, Colleagues, and Families Who are Undocumented
Presenters:
John Henderson,Connie Jaime-Lujan,Elias Quinonez
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Tuesday, January 9th 2018
Start Time:
8:00 AM
Session Length:
Half Day
Room:
Morgan Library Event Center
Description:
Students and colleagues (and their family members) who are undocumented are invaluable members of our Ram Family. This interactive session will provide participants with historical and present day information re: the broader socio-political situation, personal stories of strength and courage, and information re: what CSU (and you specifically) can do to be supportive. This four-hour training will cover the following: •The political, historical and social context of how state and federal policies have impacted college access and retention •Important terminology •Student stories highlighting challenges and successes of CSU students who are undocumented •Resources CSU has implemented to assist students and colleagues (and their families) who are undocumented •Best practices for supporting CSU students and colleagues (and their families) who are undocumented throughout the college and career pipeline
Goals and Target Audience:
Targeted audience: CSU staff, faculty, administrators and broader community members. Goals: •Raise awareness re: the complexity of the situation CSU students and colleagues (and their families) – who are undocumented – experience •Develop knowledge re: ways you can be supportive of students, colleagues and their families who are undocumented •Become aware of resources that are available on and off campus – to support students, colleagues, and their families who are undocumented •Develop awareness re: the strengths and courage of students, colleagues and their families who are undocumented and how systemic, historical systems of privilege and oppression continue to be very present when working to understand this complex topic

9:00 AM

Session Title:
Disability Discourse: The Disclosure Conundrum and Other Considerations of Disability and Employment
Presenters:
Jennifer Mayhew
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Tuesday, January 9th 2018
Start Time:
9:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
LSC 304
Description:
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed in 1990 to remove barriers to employment encountered by individuals with disabilities. Though the ADA opened doors that previously were closed, 27 years later, individuals with disabilities still encounter challenges at and in preparation of joining the workplace. Questions arise such as: “What are my legal rights?,” “Do I disclose my disability, and, if so, when?” “What can I be asked in an interview about my disability?,” “How do I request a reasonable accommodation?,” “What do I do if I disclose my disability and am treated differently or fired?,” “Can I be fired if I am an individual with a disability?,” and more. Supervisors, co-workers, advisors, and more may face these questions and wonder how best to respond to ensure individuals with disabilities are armed with resources, knowledge and tools to navigate the employment process. Topics include voluntary disclosure, the interview process, and disabilities in the workplace, and insights on how to respond to some disability related questions and support an individual with a disability.
Goals and Target Audience:
The goal of this presentation is to provide general information on considerations in employment for individuals with disabilities seeking employment and navigating the workplace. The target audience is any employee or faculty member interested in understanding disability and employment and/or wishes to provide support for individuals with disabilities who may have these employment related questions.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Snakes on Planes and Stereotype Threats
Presenters:
Karen Falkenberg
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Tuesday, January 9th 2018
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
LSC 308-10
Description:
In this session, we will engage with the concept of stereotype threat (Steele, 2010): what it is, why we should be aware of it, and what to do about it. Part of our time together will be to explore participants’ lived experiences, uncover biases, and identify when stereotype threat has been a part of the landscape. Time will be devoted to the scholarship of stereotype threats and implications for our students and our classrooms. Participants will also get an opportunity to learn what Claude Steele suggested in his keynote presentation on campus this Fall on working to build community and lessen these threats.
Goals and Target Audience:
The goal is for attendees to be able to describe the concept of stereotype threat, recognize common experiences leading to stereotype threat, and apply these ideas to classroom and campus culture. This session is appropriate for all audiences but will specifically target instructors working with students.

Wednesday, January 10th

9:00 AM

Session Title:
Do You Know an Ageist? Ageism in the Workplace”
Presenters:
Deborah Yeung,Summer Shaffer
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Wednesday, January 10th 2018
Start Time:
9:00 AM
Session Length:
2 Hours
Room:
LSC 386
Description:
Is ageism the most commonly accepted form of discrimination today? Ageism is defined as the discrimination against persons of a certain age group with a tendency to regard older persons as “debilitated, unworthy of attention, or unsuitable for employment.” This session will uncover ways that ageism presents itself in society and the workplace. Join the presenters to gain a better understanding of ageism and learn strategies on how to be more mindful of this growing form of discrimination.
Goals and Target Audience:
Team members and supervisors interested in being able to: 1) Define ageism and explain how it presents itself and 2) Gain strategies on how to be more mindful of ageism.

11:00 AM

Session Title:
Healthy Male Behavior and Healthy Communities
Presenters:
Demetrios Godenitz
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Wednesday, January 10th 2018
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
1 Hour
Room:
LSC 322
Description:
With political climate and high tensions, it is a proper time to discuss ways of being male and healthy processing of tension and emotion. The recent, local shooting (in the midst of so much else!) begs for a larger discourse about healthy male behavior as a way to present a narrative of not engaging in societal violence, instead seeking ways to acknowledge feelings beyond anger alone, debunking the "I'm an island" mindset, creating healthy practices and communities.
Goals and Target Audience:
CSU staff and students