Program for the 2020 PDI

Tuesday, January 14th

10:00 AM

Session Title:
Creating Youth Summer Programs to address your Unit’s Diversity Goals
Presenters:
Anne Van Arsdall,Dr. Patricia Vigil ,Anna Fontana,Claudia Hernandez
Category:
Outreach
Date:
Tuesday, January 14th 2020
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
1 hours 50 minutes
Room:
LSC 322
Description:
This session will provide an overview of how departmental units can identify specific diversity goals and create summer youth programming to support those goals. Presenters will share examples of best practices and discuss steps to design, implement, and evaluate culturally relevant and high impact programming. In addition, presenters will review relevant aspects of the Institutional Diversity Plan and share emerging university-level support for the creation and implementation of youth summer programs. Participants are encouraged to consider their unit goals prior to this informative and interactive session.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goals: To share a framework for designing and implementing summer youth programs as well as examples and best practices for each stage. Targeted Audience: Current and prospective summer program coordinators; staff and faculty exploring ways to enhance diversity within their units

1:00 PM

Session Title:
The Necessity and Value of Mentors in CSU Summer Programs Promoting a College Going Future for Historically Underrepresented Pre-Collegiate Populations.
Presenters:
Patricia Vigil,Heather Hall
Category:
Outreach
Date:
Tuesday, January 14th 2020
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
1 hours 50 minutes
Room:
LSC 322
Description:
Developing summer programs for pre-collegiate students allows us to create partnerships with high schools achieving CSU’s land grant mission to promote a college going future for historically underrepresented students. The presenters will offer a new paradigm of culturally competent mentorship and the importance of mentors who work with youth in summer programs. Author Torie Weiston-Serdan states that “the myriad of challenges facing marginalized youth require acknowledgement and the use of critical frames if mentoring is to be helpful.” Mentors are role models offering positive relationships and strategies in overcoming obstacles to achieve college attendance. At a predominately white institution, mentoring creates opportunities for students developing awareness, knowledge, and skills in working with diverse populations. Different methods of training will be addressed with a focus on the importance of culturally relevant training.
Goals and Target Audience:
Faculty, staff and students interested in CSU summer programs to promote equity for underrepresented populations attending college.