Program for the 2020 PDI

Monday, January 13th

10:00 AM

Session Title:
Ready to try the Undergraduate Learning Assistant (LA) Model? Organizational Techniques for your ULAs
Presenters:
Medora Huseby
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Monday, January 13th 2020
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
50 minutes
Room:
LSC 324
Description:
Employing learning assistants (LAs) in the classroom disrupts the traditional, 'professor down' style of teaching. Learning assistants serve as a bridge between the professor and the students, straddling the role of both learner and teacher. Research shows that LA involvement increases student performance. Furthermore, LAs support interactive classroom environments, which positively impacts nontraditional students (such as first generation students). LAs promote student-centered learning, where students have agency over their educational choices. Many LAs have pedagogical training (or go through pedagogical training during their LA tenure) that increases their awareness of student's backgrounds and how individual experiences impact learning. These LA specific practice create a more inclusive classroom environment. This session will focus on the importance of and preparation for weekly LA meetings, as well as strategies to increase LA learning.
Goals and Target Audience:
Participant learning outcomes: -Gain awareness of how the LA model increases classroom inclusivity -Discuss strategies for organizing courses to include LAs -Discuss strategies to prepare LAs for student interactions This session is intended for teachers that use the LA model, are considering employing the LA model in future courses, or would like to learn effective organizational techniques within the LA model.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
Who You Are Matters!: Game Play to Honor Self and Humanity's What's Next
Presenters:
Rich Feller
Category:
Personal/Professional Enrichment
Date:
Monday, January 13th 2020
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
2 hours 50 minutes
Room:
LSC 324
Description:
Play the Who You Are Matters! personal discovery game. (see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ucGFcaAuVwo ) Used throughout the US, in six countries and on Semester at Sea, the simulation is a fun, safe and highly structured storytelling experience. Players in tables of five listen deeply to honor your stories, give feedback and gratitude, and serve as resources to encourage you to act upon your “what’s next possibilities”. The game is played with high school and college students, adult learners and workers, and 50+ groups. Facilitators use it within leadership, diversity, team building, and personal development trainings at all levels. Co-created by the presenter find information at www.onelifetools.com
Goals and Target Audience:
(1) increase confidence and clarity about your “what’s next possibilities” (2) increase empathy and permission to honor yourself and humanity through “safe and structured” storytelling (3) reduce dualistic thinking (4) create a written clarification sketch and one inspired action (after receiving feedback from 4 peers at your game table) and (5) receive a passcode to the Online Storyteller ( https://onelifetools.com/pages/online-storyteller-self-directed-narrative-assessment ) to use at home for the rest of your life. The experience welcomes each campus member to honor each individual's story and "what's next" while building community. Once played, participants can easily facilitate the game in their homes, work units or leadership role.

Tuesday, January 14th

9:00 AM

Session Title:
The Future of CSU Employee Development: Bridge/My Learning
Presenters:
Marsha Benedetti,Diane Fromme,Nick Leinen
Category:
Instructional and Informational Technology
Date:
Tuesday, January 14th 2020
Start Time:
9:00 AM
Session Length:
50 minutes
Room:
LSC 324
Description:
For two years, CSU has been ramping up the Bridge Learning Management System (LMS) for employee professional development. Come learn why Bridge/My Learning represents the future of CSU employee professional development and compliance training. Watch demos and ask all your great questions to engage with the Talent Development and ACNS presenters.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goals: -Answer why consider joining the CSU My Learning movement? -Introduce Bridge/My Learning, a centralized CSU employee development platform -Provide a short Learner demo -Introduce and briefly show the My Learning Website: resources for all learners and Bridge administrators -Provide a short Department Administrator demo -Recap why Bridge/My Learning is the future of CSU employee development Audience: This session is for all campus employees who want to take professional development classes, as well as for those who want to use Bridge/My Learning as a platform for their Department professional development and compliance training and tracking.

10:00 AM

Session Title:
Team Science 101
Presenters:
Jeni Cross,Alyssa Stephens,Allison Cantwell
Category:
Research
Date:
Tuesday, January 14th 2020
Start Time:
10:00 AM
Session Length:
1 hours 50 minutes
Room:
LSC 324
Description:
People at all career levels—from recent college graduates to experienced researchers—are being called upon to collaborate to solve complex social problems. This emphasis on knowledge creation and problem-solving in groups—not as individuals—requires a different approach and a different set of competencies than previously taught in the college classroom or developed through single-researcher projects. The Science of Team Science emerged as a field of study in response to this need. Research from the Science of Team Science highlights best practices that can help researchers work on teams more successfully. Practices like followership and social sensitivity can dramatically improve team experiences and foster collaboration for researchers at all career stages. IRISS proposes to provide an interactive, 90-minute introduction to the Science of Team Science. This introduction will emphasize opportunities to incorporate the Science of Team Science principles into both teaching and research activities.
Goals and Target Audience:
The goal will be to provide a foundation to faculty and instructors at all career stages to approach collaborative research, and better prepare students for working on teams and combining knowledge to solve complex problems. This session is also appropriate for students working as part of research teams.

1:00 PM

Session Title:
A CISO Looks at DEI: Why good cybersecurity requires diversity, equity, and inclusion
Presenters:
Steven Lovaas
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Tuesday, January 14th 2020
Start Time:
1:00 PM
Session Length:
1 hours 50 minutes
Room:
LSC 324
Description:
Steve Lovaas, Chief Information Security Officer for CSU, will discuss the role of equity in cybersecurity -- how the concepts relate, how the higher education IT community is considering DEI, and how cybersecurity activities at CSU can contribute to an equitable culture. Steve will share his slightly provocative belief that achieving an equitable organizational culture is the only way to truly build a culture of security, in which people, process, and technology are knit together in a fabric that protects us all. Participants will interact in small groups to imagine various approaches to security that promote equity among the various communities at CSU; these groups will report back and contribute ideas to help spur the creation of an advisory group looking at DEI in CSU's approach to cybersecurity.
Goals and Target Audience:
Goals: 1) Participants will learn how US higher education is addressing issues of diversity and inclusion. 2) Participants will learn the major cybersecurity issues which require DEI, and how the goals of the security team can only be fully realized when equity is stressed. 3) Participants will be given an opportunity to express interest in participating on a DEI advisory group for information security at CSU. Targeted audience: IT leaders and those interested in how equity fits in IT (and especially IT security).

Wednesday, January 15th

9:00 AM

Session Title:
First Gen & _____: An Intersectional Approach
Presenters:
Miel McCarthy,Fabiola Mora,Jill Putman
Category:
Diversity
Date:
Wednesday, January 15th 2020
Start Time:
9:00 AM
Session Length:
1 hours 50 minutes
Room:
LSC 324
Description:
The purpose of this presentation is to examine and discuss the experiences of first generation students who hold multiple marginalized or historically underrepresented identities (student of color, low income, LGBTQ, undocumented, student with disability, etc.). These students come with unique challenges and often don’t find one office on campus that meets all their needs. National data indicates a need to support first generation students due to lower retention and graduation rates. Colorado State University (CSU) recognized a need to provide programming and initiatives to support first generation students that approached the work with a more intersectional lens, which was the impetus to develop programming that is more inclusive and valuing of the many other identities first generations students hold. CSU has had documented success with cross-campus collaborative programming that had addresses that needs of first generation students with multiple intersecting identities. The presenters will use an interactive small and large group format to engage in discussion about identity and intersectionality for the first half of the session. The second half of the session will use a similar interactive format that will allow attendees to examine programs and initiatives within their departments at Colorado State University that are closing achievement gaps and increasing student success by engaging students from an intersectional approach. Participants will leave the session with strategies that support students sitting at the intersections of first generation and multiple marginalized identities
Goals and Target Audience:
Participants will be able to articulate the definition of "intersectionality" and engage in critical discussion about the unique barriers students with multiple marginalized identities face as first generation students - Presenters will use small groups to engage participants in discussion about identity and holistic support needs of first generation students as backed up by personal experience in the field. Participants will be able to identify best practices for holistically supporting first generation students with multiple intersecting identities - Presenters will share information about best practices and how best practices helped with the development of several programs and initiatives at Colorado State University that have been demonstrating positive student success outcomes, like, increased retention, persistence, and graduation. Participants will leave with tangible program ideas to use in their own departments to create a more student ready campus that values the experiences of students who are firstgen&_____.

11:00 AM

Session Title:
Teaching the Importance of Science Communication: Elevator speech to reading primary literature
Presenters:
Medora Huseby
Category:
General Teaching Topics
Date:
Wednesday, January 15th 2020
Start Time:
11:00 AM
Session Length:
50 minutes
Room:
LSC 324
Description:
This session will showcase different techniques to encourage students to communicate their research. The first technique is an ‘elevator speech’ which uses non jargon terminology, in a fast (30 second) way that engages their non-science/non-major peers and other lay persons. The second aspect to this session is to break apart primary literature to show students how to assess what the paper is saying into three parts: What is known previously (they say), what the authors discovered (I say/we say), and why it contributes to the field (so what). This exercise encourages students to compartmentalize primary research into manageable portions, as well as sets a foundation to critically assess primary research articles.
Goals and Target Audience:
The learning objectives for this discussion would be: 1. Identify ways to encourage students to discuss their research in nontechnical terms (the elevator speech) 2. Examine why elevator speeches are an important skill for scientists of all levels to master 3. Discuss the difficulty of learning how to read primary research articles 4. Break down the abstract of a paper using ‘they say, I say/we say, and so what’ approach The target audience is instructors or individuals planning on instructing.