TILT Events - List Format

Overview:

The following is a list of scheduled events sponsored by TILT. You can use the options on the right side of this page to filter events so that only selected types of events are displayed.

You can also view and enroll in events that require registration. (If you are not already logged in, you will be asked to do so. Anyone with an eID can log in to the TILT site.) To view the details for each event, click on the event title.

 

Event Title

Description

Date

1

Notice and Respond

The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health. The faculty version models an effective interaction between a faculty member and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important. A combination of learning modalities is used, including a realistic filmed scenario, participant discussion and a review of response options and campus resources. Lunch will be provided by TILT.

Oct 3, 2017

2

Notice and Respond

The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health. The faculty version models an effective interaction between a faculty member and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important. A combination of learning modalities is used, including a realistic filmed scenario, participant discussion and a review of response options and campus resources. Lunch will be provided by TILT.

Oct 6, 2017

3

Diversity Workshop 2: Cross-Cultural Conversations

This workshop will expose participants to helpful models and communication principles for interacting across cultural differences. We might speak a common language, but still have very different ways of interacting depending on our cultural identity and back ground. Learning about cultural patterns can help us interact with our colleagues and serve our students more effectively. Join us in this substantive and interactive session.

Dec 5, 2017

4

Collaborative Conversations

Starting this fall, a group of "dialoguers" from across campus will meet to collectively explore how they understand specific issues related to gender and apply their perspective to their personal and professional lives. The dialogues featured in Collaborative Conversations do more than just highlight the “what” of diversity and inclusion - they also model the “how” of engaging in unscripted, open-ended dialogue to learn from and with one another across our differences. Each Collaborative Conversation features an hour of dialogue with opportunities for audience participation. The space will be held for a second hour so that attendees who wish to stay may informally discuss and process topics raised in the conversation. * These events will be recorded and links will be made available for viewing by public audiences.

Oct 10, 2017

5

Collaborative Conversations

Starting this fall, a group of "dialoguers" from across campus will meet to collectively explore how they understand specific issues related to gender and apply their perspective to their personal and professional lives. The dialogues featured in Collaborative Conversations do more than just highlight the “what” of diversity and inclusion - they also model the “how” of engaging in unscripted, open-ended dialogue to learn from and with one another across our differences. Each Collaborative Conversation features an hour of dialogue with opportunities for audience participation. The space will be held for a second hour so that attendees who wish to stay may informally discuss and process topics raised in the conversation. * These events will be recorded and links will be made available for viewing by public audiences.

Nov 16, 2017

6

Mentoring and Evaluating Teaching Effectiveness

This session aims to share a framework for constructive mentoring of effective teaching and thoughts/tools on how best to provide and utilize constructive feedback. Goals and Objectives: 1. Discuss how "Teaching Effectiveness" has been framed. 2. Share models of how to combine evaluation and mentoring with an aim of excellence in the teaching-learning environment.

Oct 24, 2017

7

Student Course Surveys - The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

This session aims to discuss the data on the use and misuse of student course surveys. An update of the status, progress, and aims of the CSU course survey redesigtn will also be discussed. Goals and Objectives: 1. Discuss what student course feedback can (and cannot) tell us about the teaching-learning environment. 2. Share an update on the CSU course survey redesign efforts, including the challenges of use and misuse of the data.

Oct 31, 2017

8

Crafting a Teaching Persona

The Latin word “persona” most directly translates to “mask.” What kind of mask should we wear while teaching? Should we wear a mask while teaching? How much of our teaching persona should be our authentic personality and how much of it should be a mask? How do we develop a teaching style that works for us as instructors and is also conducive to student learning? These questions are particularly salient for Graduate Teaching Assistants who may not be much older than their students and/or may not perceive themselves as having much more experience than their students. Together, we will explore what it means to put on a mask and to embrace a persona that strikes the right balance between your authentic self and the masked authority figure needed to effectively manage a classroom. Lunch will be provided. This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.

Nov 7, 2017

9

Situating Oneself in an Interconnected World through Activity-Based Learning

Engage students in learning by using dynamic activities that engage their imagination. This interactive presentation will use two examples to explore how drawing, experiential activities, and identity exploration can be used to teach complex topics. By making lessons relevant to the lives of students, they walk away with a deeper understanding of their discipline as well as greater awareness of themselves as thinkers and actors in an interconnected world. Discussion will allow participants from all disciplines to share their own techniques for engaging students in activities-based learning.

Oct 25, 2017

10

Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century: Educating the Whole Student for Global Ecological Challenges

Ecology in the 21st century requires cross-disciplinary and international collaboration. This session will explore how to prepare students for those collaborative practices while engaging students in their own learning processes. CSU staculty (faculty and staff who sailed on Semester at Sea) will share what they have learned from engaging students in research, co-curricular experiences, collaborating across divisions, and developing cross-national partnerships. While facilitators will share specific examples of engaged learning, discussion will allow participants to share what methods have worked (or not) as a means of engaging students in global issues and concerns. Lunch will be served.

Nov 14, 2017

11

Student-Centered Approach to Lesson Planning

During this workshop, participants will gain an understanding of how to approach a lesson plan that is both student-centered and results-driven. They will learn about essential components of a strong lesson plan and the purpose of the interactions of those components.

Dr. Wendy Fothergill is an assistant professor in the School of Education's Center for Educator Preparation at Colorado State University. Prior to her position at CSU, Dr. Fothergill served for 16 years as a teacher and educational leader in Fort Collins, Greeley and Loveland PK-12 schools. Her scholarly interests focus on building communities of practice in PK-12 schools. She is currently engaged in research on structures of practice to support school leaders. Dr. Fothergill coordinates, instructs and advises in the Principal Licensure and Master’s Plus Teaching Secondary Programs.

Dr. Derek Decker is an assistant professor in the Center for Educator Preparation in the School of Education at Colorado State University. He is a coordinator in the master's plus teaching licensure program, instructs within the master’s program, and supervises teacher candidates. Coming directly from the public school classroom as a teacher, Dr. Decker understands the importance of high quality teachers, teaching, and leadership. His scholarly interests center on the benefits of clinical practice where strong partnerships between PK-12 schools and teacher preparation programs flourish.

Oct 30, 2017

12

Inclusive Pedagogy and You

What is Inclusive Pedagogy, why should I care about it, and how can I create it? Inclusive pedagogy is a method of teaching in which educators and students work together to create a supportive and open environment that fosters social justice and allows each individual to be fully present and feel equally valued (Georgetown University, 2017). Research shows that classroom climate impacts student learning, persistence, and well-being; as educators, we have the opportunity to implement diversity and inclusion best practices into our classrooms to maximize student learning. Through this interactive session, strategies, techniques, and personal narratives will be employed to better inform inclusive pedagogical practice.

Nov 9, 2017

13

Faculty of Color Experiences - Navigating the Tenure Process

This panel of Faculty of Color has been asked to share their experiences with the tenure process. The conversation will touch on issues related to service, scholarship, collaboration and reports. This is an opportunity for participants to explore challenges and best practices, and to build community. This session may lead to further opportunities within a Faculty of Color Interest Group. Workshop Goals Participants of this workshop will: 1. Hear about the experiences of their peer faculty members 2. Have the opportunity to discuss issues and solutions 3. Begin to build community across departments and colleges 4. Address expectations (of departments, students, other faculty, etc.) 5. Explore ways to navigate the systems of academia 6. Identify interests for a developing mentoring program 7. Learn best practices across disciplines, relating to tenure

Oct 30, 2017

14

College of Business MTI Luncheon

This Workshop from Apple’s Development Executive, Dr. Jon Landis, will focus on the impact mobile technology has had on Higher Education and on the Business world. This impact includes a paradigm shift in how information is disseminated and displayed. Dr. Jon Landis is the U.S. Development Executive with Apple Inc. He is a former professor in the College of Education from Millersville University where he was the graduate coordinator of the Leadership Program and the Coordinator of the CyberSafe Institute. Jon holds his Ph.D. in Sociology, a Masters degree in Education Leadership, and a B.S. in Chemistry. He has served as a chemistry instructor, principal, curriculum director, and IT Director. Dr. Landis speaks nationally on the opportunities associated with mobile technology in education. The presentation will be coordinated through Aaron Grider - Apple Senior Account Executive for Higher Education in the state of Colorado. Aaron is CSU’s primary Apple contact. Master Teacher Workshops are a great opportunity to grab some lunch, socialize with your colleagues from all the departments, and learn something in the process. Please RSVP so that we may obtain an accurate headcount for lunch. As always, Master Teacher Workshops are open to all faculty and staff.

Oct 4, 2017

15

Sex Work or Sex Trafficking?: Perspectives from Research and Real Life

Feminists have been debating the commercial sex industry since the 1980s, with some arguing that pornography and prostitution inherently degrade women and others advocating for feminist erotica and legalized sex work. Increased attention to the problem of human trafficking recently has revived this debate among feminists, and both research and survivor stories shape feminist perspectives on commercial sex exploitation. This discussion will feature Dr. Karrin Anderson, Professor of Communication Studies and instructor of the CSU course “SPCM 320: Communication and Human Trafficking,” and Megan Lundstrom, Director of Free Our Girls, a northern Colorado anti-trafficking organization that works with survivors of human trafficking and educates our community on trafficking prevention. The discussion will focus on the nature of commercial sex exploitation, using current research and the real-world experiences of survivors to inform a discussion about feminist responses to sex work and sex trafficking.

Oct 9, 2017

16

College of Natural Sciences MTI Luncheon

We all want every student to succeed, and we want them to understand that they are welcomed and supported. What strategies can we employ to achieve these goals? And, as importantly, what might we be doing that hampers our progress? There’s no single answer to these questions, and all of us have experiences that will shed light on this issue. In this session, we’ll spend most of our time in small moderated groups, sharing ideas and insights with our colleagues. You’ll get to meet and interact with folks from other departments, you’ll come away with an increased understanding of the issues at play, and you’ll pick up—and you’ll share with others—some practical suggestions of how to make your classroom more equitable and more inclusive. Please join the conversation! Please RSVP to cns_info@colostate.edu by Friday, October 6, 2017.

Oct 10, 2017