Professional Development Seminars: Fall 2016

Seminars

Mentoring and Evaluating Teaching Effectiveness

Dr. Matt Hickey

Oct. 24 2:00-3:00pm
TILT Room 105

This session aims to share a framework for constructive mentoring of effective teaching and thoughts/tools on how best to provide and utilize constructive feedback. Goals and Objectives: 1. Discuss how "Teaching Effectiveness" has been framed. 2. Share models of how to combine evaluation and mentoring with an aim of excellence in the teaching-learning environment.

Limit: 20

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Using Undergraduate Learning Assistants to Promote Student Engagement in a STEM Course

Dr. Jennifer McLean

Oct. 24 12:00-1:00pm
TILT 105

Interactions between undergraduate learning assistants (ULAs) and students have the potential to be a high-impact practice, not only for the ULA, but also for the course students. In this seminar, I hope to show you how I have changed the role of my ULAs from a one that focused on helping me with the administrative tasks in my large enrollment STEM course, to a role that is focused instead on increasing student engagement with the course material, as well as enriching the learning experience for my ULAs.
All CSU faculty, special faculty, and graduate students are invited to attend.
This seminar counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.

Limit: 20

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Situating Oneself in an Interconnected World through Activity-Based Learning

Toni Zimmerman, Professor, Human Development & Family Studies and Sophie Esch, Assistant Professor, Languages Literatures and Cultures

Oct. 25 3:00-4:30pm
Lory Student Center Room 386

Engage students in learning by using dynamic activities that engage their imagination. This interactive presentation will use two examples to explore how drawing, experiential activities, and identity exploration can be used to teach complex topics. By making lessons relevant to the lives of students, they walk away with a deeper understanding of their discipline as well as greater awareness of themselves as thinkers and actors in an interconnected world. Discussion will allow participants from all disciplines to share their own techniques for engaging students in activities-based learning.

Limit: 60

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Faculty of Color Experiences - Navigating the Tenure Process

Ria Vigil, Office of the Vice President for Diversity

Oct. 30 12:00-1:30pm
Lory Student Center Room 372-374

This panel of Faculty of Color has been asked to share their experiences with the tenure process. The conversation will touch on issues related to service, scholarship, collaboration and reports. This is an opportunity for participants to explore challenges and best practices, and to build community. This session may lead to further opportunities within a Faculty of Color Interest Group. Workshop Goals Participants of this workshop will: 1. Hear about the experiences of their peer faculty members 2. Have the opportunity to discuss issues and solutions 3. Begin to build community across departments and colleges 4. Address expectations (of departments, students, other faculty, etc.) 5. Explore ways to navigate the systems of academia 6. Identify interests for a developing mentoring program 7. Learn best practices across disciplines, relating to tenure. Lunch will be provided by TILT.

Limit: 30

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Student Course Surveys - The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Dr. Matt Hickey

Oct. 31 2:00-3:00pm
TILT Room 105

This session aims to discuss the data on the use and misuse of student course surveys. An update of the status, progress, and aims of the CSU course survey redesigtn will also be discussed. Goals and Objectives: 1. Discuss what student course feedback can (and cannot) tell us about the teaching-learning environment. 2. Share an update on the CSU course survey redesign efforts, including the challenges of use and misuse of the data.

Limit: 20

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Inclusive Pedagogy and You

Ria Vigil, Office of the Vice President for Diversity

Nov. 9 12:00-1:30pm
Lory Student Center- Room 312

What is Inclusive Pedagogy, why should I care about it, and how can I create it? Inclusive pedagogy is a method of teaching in which educators and students work together to create a supportive and open environment that fosters social justice and allows each individual to be fully present and feel equally valued (Georgetown University, 2017). Research shows that classroom climate impacts student learning, persistence, and well-being; as educators, we have the opportunity to implement diversity and inclusion best practices into our classrooms to maximize student learning. Through this interactive session, strategies, techniques, and personal narratives will be employed to better inform inclusive pedagogical practice. Lunch will be provided by TILT.

Limit: 30

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Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century: Educating the Whole Student for Global Ecological Challenges

Robert Kling, Associate Professor of Economics; Jody Donovan, Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students; and Ursula Quillmann, Assistant Professor, Forest and Rangeland Stewardship

Nov. 14 12:15-1:45pm
Lory Student Center Room 376

Ecology in the 21st century requires cross-disciplinary and international collaboration. This session will explore how to prepare students for those collaborative practices while engaging students in their own learning processes. CSU staculty (faculty and staff who sailed on Semester at Sea) will share what they have learned from engaging students in research, co-curricular experiences, collaborating across divisions, and developing cross-national partnerships. While facilitators will share specific examples of engaged learning, discussion will allow participants to share what methods have worked (or not) as a means of engaging students in global issues and concerns. Lunch will be served.

Limit: 20

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Collaborative Conversations

Cori Wong

Nov. 16 1:00-3:00pm
Lory Student Center Room 372-374

Starting this fall, a group of "dialoguers" from across campus will meet to collectively explore how they understand specific issues related to gender and apply their perspective to their personal and professional lives. The dialogues featured in Collaborative Conversations do more than just highlight the “what” of diversity and inclusion - they also model the “how” of engaging in unscripted, open-ended dialogue to learn from and with one another across our differences. Each Collaborative Conversation features an hour of dialogue with opportunities for audience participation. The space will be held for a second hour so that attendees who wish to stay may informally discuss and process topics raised in the conversation. * These events will be recorded and links will be made available for viewing by public audiences.

Limit: 40

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