TILT Events - List Format

Upcoming Events

Date
Title
Description
November 5, 2020
Faculty/instructors can contribute to an anti-racist campus for BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, & People of Color), multiracial/biracial, and white students. It requires understanding the barriers and strategies for incorporating anti-racist pedagogy. Students should complete CSU courses with critical skills to recognize and eradicate systemic racism in their academic field. This could enhance the sense of belonging and/or responsibility in an anti-racist campus. Faculty/instructors will gain an understanding of how both racism and antiracism impacts teaching and classroom engagement. Prior to the workshop, participants are required to review the CSU Student Lists of Demands from 2010-2020.

This session is part of the Racial Justice Training Series offered by the Office of the Vice President for Diversity.

This workshop counts toward the graduate teaching certificate and aligns with the Inclusive Pedagogy and Classroom Climate domains of the Teaching Effectiveness Framework.
November 5, 2020
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy as well as solicit advice from TILT Professional Development staff as you develop your own. Specifically, this session will include:
An overview of the research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
An overview of the basic structure and central information that should be included
Ideas for strategies from CSU faculty and what they look for in a Teaching Philosophy.

This workshop will be offered live via Zoom. Participants will be able to interact with the presenters via the Zoom "chat" function throughout the workshop, and then we will open up to a live Q & A at the end.
This workshop counts toward the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate.
November 11, 2020
Research indicates that students’ classroom experiences and academic outcomes improve when they feel that the instructor believes they are capable of learning new things. Students who feel supported and connected to a community of learners are more likely to stay academically engaged and utilize resources provided to them by the institution. In this session, we will focus on the course syllabus, a powerful tool that every faculty member has to communicate with students, and how small changes in wording can ensure that messages, policies, and practices demonstrate the faculty member’s constructive beliefs about students’ abilities.
This workshop will be offered live via Zoom. The presenter will utilize Zoom's breakout room function for active learning during the presentation.
This workshop counts toward the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate. This session aligns with the Classroom Climate and Student Motivation domains of the Teaching Effectiveness Framework.
November 11, 2020
Participants will have the opportunity to discuss the journey, strategies and narratives of becoming an antiracist person. The discussion will focus on how both racist and antiracist strategies, definitions and actions are reflected in power, biology, ethnicity, body, culture, color and other topics. For more information about the book: https://www.oneworldlit.com/books/how-to-be-an-antiracist-hc

Biographies of Co-facilitation Team
Fleurette (Flo) King serves as Equity Educator in TILT and Undergraduate Affairs at Colorado State University, reporting to Vice Provost Kelly Long. In addition, King is non-tenure faculty who teaches in the Student Affairs/Higher Education (SAHE) program. Flo provides faculty-facing professional develop to assist with inclusive pedagogy and classroom management. King has been a diversity, equity, inclusion and justice advocate and educator for over 27 years in higher education. King's career journey includes full-time appointments at a variety of higher education institutions, including DePaul University, Princeton University, the University of Michigan, University of Connecticut, Loras College and others. King has completed a M.A. in sociology from DePaul University and a B.A. in sociology with a minor in ethnic studies from Bowling Green State University. Currently, Flo is pursuing a doctorate in Higher Education Leadership at Colorado State University. Flo enjoys short walks on the beach, racquetball, tennis, cycling, fishing, social movement history and documentaries. Fleurette pronounced like floretta. King uses any version of the following pronouns she/they/per.

Emily Ambrose, M.S. (she/hers), has dedicated over 15 years of her professional career and personal life to leadership development, training, facilitation, diversity, inclusion, and equity work. Currently and for over 12 years, Emily has been working at Colorado State University in the Lory Student Center/SLiCE office and guides in the Grand Canyon during the summer. With a passion for making the sometimes taboo topics accessible and relatable to all, Emily has worked closely with non-profits, outdoor industry companies, and presented at conferences on how to shift work culture and infuse diversity, equity, and inclusion into the workplace. Specifically focused on issues around the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community (LGBTQ), additional passion areas include sexism and sexual harassment, deconstructing racial bias, understanding white supremacy culture, and recognizing the interwoven nature of oppression. Emily lives in Fort Collins, Colorado and enjoys salsa dancing (pre-Pandemic), her community, her partner, and her three dogs.
December 2, 2020
Effectively addressing the difficulty for white people to talk about racism part of the process for improving race relations, eradicating racism and teaching an antiracist curriculum. The book discussion will allow for personal reflections on experiences and strategies with the hope to move beyond the difficulties, including white fragility. White fragility is an obstacle to having real conversations and actions about white privilege and racism. For more information about the book: http://www.beacon.org/White-Fragility-P1631.aspx

Facilitated by Fleurette King & Emily Ambrose

Fleurette (Flo) King serves as Equity Educator in TILT and Undergraduate Affairs at Colorado State University, reporting to Vice Provost Kelly Long. In addition, King is non-tenure faculty who teaches in the Student Affairs/Higher Education (SAHE) program. Flo provides faculty-facing professional develop to assist with inclusive pedagogy and classroom management. King has been a diversity, equity, inclusion and justice advocate and educator for over 27 years in higher education. King's career journey includes full-time appointments at a variety of higher education institutions, including DePaul University, Princeton University, the University of Michigan, University of Connecticut, Loras College and others. King has completed a M.A. in sociology from DePaul University and a B.A. in sociology with a minor in ethnic studies from Bowling Green State University. Currently, Flo is pursuing a doctorate in Higher Education Leadership at Colorado State University. Flo enjoys short walks on the beach, racquetball, tennis, cycling, fishing, social movement history and documentaries. Fleurette pronounced like floretta. King uses any version of the following pronouns she/they/per.

Emily Ambrose, M.S. (she/hers), has dedicated over 15 years of her professional career and personal life to leadership development, training, facilitation, diversity, inclusion, and equity work. Currently and for over 12 years, Emily has been working at Colorado State University in the Lory Student Center/SLiCE office and guides in the Grand Canyon during the summer. With a passion for making the sometimes taboo topics accessible and relatable to all, Emily has worked closely with non-profits, outdoor industry companies, and presented at conferences on how to shift work culture and infuse diversity, equity, and inclusion into the workplace. Specifically focused on issues around the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community (LGBTQ), additional passion areas include sexism and sexual harassment, deconstructing racial bias, understanding white supremacy culture, and recognizing the interwoven nature of oppression. Emily lives in Fort Collins, Colorado and enjoys salsa dancing (pre-Pandemic), her community, her partner, and her three dogs.
December 10, 2020
Faculty/instructors can contribute to an anti-racist campus for BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, & People of Color), multiracial/biracial, and white students. It requires understanding the barriers and strategies for incorporating anti-racist pedagogy. Students should complete CSU courses with critical skills to recognize and eradicate systemic racism in their academic field. This could enhance the sense of belonging and/or responsibility on an anti-racist campus. Faculty/instructors will gain an understanding of how both racism and antiracism impacts teaching and classroom engagement. Prior to the workshop, participants are required to review the CSU Student Lists of Demands from 2010-2020: https://racebiasandequityinitiative.colostate.edu/student-demands/

Facilitated by Fleurette King

Fleurette (Flo) King serves as Equity Educator in TILT and Undergraduate Affairs at Colorado State University, reporting to Vice Provost Kelly Long. In addition, King is non-tenure faculty who teaches in the Student Affairs/Higher Education (SAHE) program. Flo provides faculty-facing professional develop to assist with inclusive pedagogy and classroom management. King has been a diversity, equity, inclusion and justice advocate and educator for over 27 years in higher education. King's career journey includes full-time appointments at a variety of higher education institutions, including DePaul University, Princeton University, the University of Michigan, University of Connecticut, Loras College and others. King has completed a M.A. in sociology from DePaul University and a B.A. in sociology with a minor in ethnic studies from Bowling Green State University. Currently, Flo is pursuing a doctorate in Higher Education Leadership at Colorado State University. Flo enjoys short walks on the beach, racquetball, tennis, cycling, fishing, social movement history and documentaries. Fleurette pronounced like floretta. King uses any version of the following pronouns she/they/per.
December 29, 2020
Faculty/instructors can contribute to an anti-racist campus for BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, & People of Color), multiracial/biracial, and white students. It requires understanding the barriers and strategies for incorporating anti-racist pedagogy. Students should complete CSU courses with critical skills to recognize and eradicate systemic racism in their academic field. This could enhance the sense of belonging and/or responsibility on an anti-racist campus. Faculty/instructors will gain an understanding of how both racism and antiracism impacts teaching and classroom engagement. Prior to the workshop, participants are required to review the CSU Student Lists of Demands from 2010-2020: https://racebiasandequityinitiative.colostate.edu/student-demands/

Facilitated by Fleurette King
Fleurette (Flo) King serves as Equity Educator in TILT and Undergraduate Affairs at Colorado State University, reporting to Vice Provost Kelly Long. In addition, King is non-tenure faculty who teaches in the Student Affairs/Higher Education (SAHE) program. Flo provides faculty-facing professional develop to assist with inclusive pedagogy and classroom management. King has been a diversity, equity, inclusion and justice advocate and educator for over 27 years in higher education. King's career journey includes full-time appointments at a variety of higher education institutions, including DePaul University, Princeton University, the University of Michigan, University of Connecticut, Loras College and others. King has completed a M.A. in sociology from DePaul University and a B.A. in sociology with a minor in ethnic studies from Bowling Green State University. Currently, Flo is pursuing a doctorate in Higher Education Leadership at Colorado State University. Flo enjoys short walks on the beach, racquetball, tennis, cycling, fishing, social movement history and documentaries. Fleurette pronounced like floretta. King uses any version of the following pronouns she/they/per.
January 11, 2021
Call for proposals open until November 2nd.
January 12, 2021
Call for proposals open until November 2nd.
January 13, 2021
Call for proposals open until November 2nd.

Past Events

Date
Title
Description
October 26, 2020 - November 15, 2020
An online, facilitated, asynchronous short course focused on using a range of instructional techniques to promote student motivation, which research on learning has consistently identified as a key factor in academic success. Approaches include helping students make connections between course subject matter and their interests, prompting them to make connections across topics, and showing instructor belief in their capacity to succeed. This short course aligns with the Student Motivation, and Pedagogical Content Knowledge domains of the TILT Teaching Effectiveness Framework. Participant time: 12 hours over 3 weeks.

Course Outcomes: Participants will be able to...
  1. Apply researched motivation techniques to your course.
  2. Identify supports for students for main course content.
  3. Promote growth mindset and self-efficacy during instruction.
  4. Integrate at least one new motivation technique into your course.
October 13, 2020
In this session we will discuss how to assess the skills you want your students to develop, helping them move past memorization and into critical thinking.
This session counts toward the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate.
This session aligns with the "Feedback and Assessment" domain of the TILT Teaching Effectiveness Framework.
October 13, 2020
To address a problem, you have to understand the nature of the problem itself. Whiteness, White Privilege, and White Supremacy are distinct and deeply interconnected realities. This session will offer attendees a foundation for understanding how they reinforce one another to better identify means for challenging norms that uphold whiteness and white supremacy. Those interested in unpacking whiteness or asking genuine questions about whiteness are welcome to attend.

This session is part of the Racial Justice Training Series offered by the Office of the Vice President for Diversity.

This workshop counts toward the graduate teaching certificate and aligns with the Inclusive Pedagogy and Classroom Climate domains of the Teaching Effectiveness Framework.
October 5, 2020
Traditional approaches to syllabus construction treat the syllabus as a "contract" between student and instructor and, as such, often take on a punitive tone, communicating to students the negative consequences of their poor behavior/performance in class. More recently, there has been a turn to "learner-centered" syllabi which, instead of focusing on punishment and what not to do, present students with a roadmap for success in a given course. This workshop will focus on how to build a learner-centered syllabus that puts students and their needs/perspectives/success at the center of the document, positions students and the instructor as part of a partnership, and offers opportunities for shared decision making between students and instructor.
If you have a syllabus you are hoping to make more learner-centered, please bring it to this session as we will dedicate some time to workshopping.

This workshop will be offered live via Zoom and will also be recorded for later viewing. Participants will be able to interact with the presenter via the Zoom "chat" function throughout the workshop, and then we will open up to a live Q & A at the end.
This workshop counts toward the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate.
This Session aligns with the Teaching Effectiveness Framework: Curriculum/Curricular Alignment.
October 5, 2020 - October 25, 2020
An online, facilitated, mostly asynchronous short course focused on fostering a supportive classroom community, engaging students, and developing feedback and assessment strategies, with attention to doing so effectively in large-enrollment sections. This short course aligns with the Classroom Climate, Instructional Strategies, and Feedback & Assessment domains of the TILT Teaching Effectiveness Framework. Participant time: 9 hours over 3 weeks.

Course Outcomes: Participants will be able to...
  • Identify and plan how you will use at least two new strategies to build a welcoming and supportive classroom community using Canvas. Choose what fits best for you, your students, and your content.
  • Discuss ideas for intentionally creating a positive classroom climate in your online course.
  • Identify one or two new strategies to foster student participation in your courses.
  • Create a video to engage students.
  • Choose formative (e.g., frequent low stakes) assessment techniques you might use in a medium- or large-enrollment course.
  • Identify summative assessments you might use in a medium- or large-enrollment course.
  • Identify strategies to provide feedback on assessments in a manageable way in medium- to large-enrollment courses.
September 23, 2020
This session will clarify how gender shapes classroom learning environments in ways that affect students’ ability to learn and instructors’ ability to teach. Responding to gender bias in ourselves, our students, our content, and our teaching practices is critical for creating inclusive and equitable spaces that foster meaningful engagement for everyone, but first, we have to learn to recognize how gender is everywhere.
This workshop will be offered live via Zoom. Participants will be able to interact with the presenter via the Zoom "chat" function throughout the workshop, and then we will open up to a live Q & A at the end.
September 15, 2020
Participants will hear from professional staff from the Pride Resource Center about the experiences of our LGBTQ+ students on campus and explore ways to better support our students across diverse gender identities and sexual and romantic orientations in ways that help our LGBTQ+ students thrive in the classroom.
September 9, 2020
The Latin word “persona” most directly translates to “mask.” What kind of mask should we wear while teaching? Should we wear a mask while teaching? How much of our teaching persona should be our authentic personality and how much of it should be a mask? How do we develop a teaching style that works for us as instructors and is also conducive to student learning? These questions have become even more complex as instructors move to online (or hybrid) teaching environments in the wake of COVID-19. This workshop will explore what it means to put on a mask and develop a teaching persona with consideration of the specific demands of an online teaching environment.

This workshop will be offered live via Zoom and will also be recorded for later viewing. Participants will be able to interact with the presenter via the Zoom "chat" function throughout the workshop, and then we will open up to a live Q & A at the end.
This workshop counts toward the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate.
This session aligns with the "Instructional Strategies" domain of the TILT Teaching Effectiveness Framework.
August 4, 2020
The Latin word “persona” most directly translates to “mask.” What kind of mask should we wear while teaching? Should we wear a mask while teaching? How much of our teaching persona should be our authentic personality and how much of it should be a mask? How do we develop a teaching style that works for us as instructors and is also conducive to student learning? These questions have become even more complex as instructors move to online (or hybrid) teaching environments in the wake of COVID-19. This workshop will explore what it means to put on a mask and develop a teaching persona with consideration of the specific demands of an online teaching environment.

This workshop will be offered live via Zoom and will also be recorded for later viewing. Participants will be able to interact with the presenter via the Zoom "chat" function throughout the workshop, and then we will open up to a live Q & A at the end. Please be sure to register at least 24 hours prior to the workshop itself so that you may receive the Zoom invitation we will send out the day before.
This workshop counts toward the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate.
This session aligns with the "Instructional Strategies" domain of the TILT Teaching Effectiveness Framework.
July 28, 2020
Create Assignments module of TILT’s BPiT course: a facilitated, virtual, asynchronous course on aligning assignments with major course learning assessments (e.g., exams, papers, projects, etc.). Instructors will consider how to align smaller assignments with learning outcomes and major learning assessments, how to scaffold those major learning assessments, and how to write clear assignment instructions and use variety in assignment types to reach all learners. Participant time: 12 hours over three weeks. Sections to be offered 8/17/20 – 9/6/20. Registration closes July 28 at noon. Please disregard the dates and times below and the dates and times listed in the registration confirmation email. These are for registration purposes and are not the dates/times for the course/participation.
July 20, 2020
This webinar will introduce implementable ideas for building student trust, motivation and engagement.
This session aligns with the "Instructional Strategies" domain of the TILT Teaching Effectiveness Framework.
July 14, 2020
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy as well as solicit advice from TILT Professional Development staff as you develop your own. Specifically, this session will include:
An overview of the research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
An overview of the basic structure and central information that should be included
Ideas for strategies from CSU faculty and what they look for in a Teaching Philosophy.

This workshop will be offered live via Zoom and will also be recorded for later viewing. Participants will be able to interact with the presenters via the Zoom "chat" function throughout the workshop, and then we will open up to a live Q & A at the end. Please be sure to register at least 24 hours prior to the workshop itself so that you may receive the Zoom invitation we will send out the day before.
This workshop counts toward the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate.
July 7, 2020
Student Motivation module of TILT’s BPiT course: a facilitated, virtual, asynchronous course on using a range of instructional techniques to promote student motivation, which research on learning has consistently identified as a key factor in academic success. Approaches include helping students make connections between course subject matter and their interests, prompting them to make connections across topics, and showing instructor belief in their capacity to succeed. Participant time: 12 hours over three weeks. Sections to be offered 7/27/20 – 8/16/20. Registration closes July 7 at noon. Please disregard the dates and times below and the dates and times listed in the registration confirmation email. These are for registration purposes and are not the dates/times for the course/participation.
July 7, 2020
A facilitated, virtual, asynchronous course on using best instructional practices in teaching an online courses. Emphasizes building a strong online classroom community, engaging students, and assessing deeper learning, with attention to doing so effectively in large-enrollment sections. Participant time: 6 hours over one week. Sections to be offered weekly, 7/27/20 - 8/23/20. Registration closes July 7 at noon.

Please complete this Survey to select the section in which you want to enroll.

Please disregard the dates and times below and the dates and times listed in the registration confirmation email. These are for registration purposes and are not the dates/times for the course/participation.
July 7, 2020
Teaching in the midst of COVID-19 has proven to be extremely challenging, especially with the constant uncertainty about teaching formats: Will I be teaching online? In-person? Hybrid? Hy-flex? Could my class format be subject to change suddenly due to shifts in public health? This workshop will offer one way of adapting to multiple (and potentially) changing teaching and learning formats: The Choose-Your-Own Adventure syllabus. A Choose-Your-Own Adventure syllabus allows students to choose from a variety of different possible assignments (or even propose their own) in order to play to students' strengths and give them agency over their own learning, all while working toward the same overarching course objectives and goals.
We will discuss what a Choose-Your-Own-Adventure syllabus is, how it benefits student learning as an example of learner-centered teaching, and how it can help educators adapt to teaching in uncertain times. The presenter will also discuss their experience using a Choose-Your-Own Adventure syllabus in the past, while reflecting on what worked, what didn't, and what student evaluations revealed about the usefulness of the Choose-Your-Own Adventure format.

This workshop will be offered live via Zoom and will also be recorded for later viewing. Participants will be able to interact with the presenter via the Zoom "chat" function throughout the workshop, and then we will open up to a live Q & A at the end. Please be sure to register at least 24 hours prior to the workshop itself so that you may receive the Zoom invitation we will send out the day before.
This workshop counts toward the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate.
June 12, 2020
First Four Weeks module of TILT’s Best Practices in Teaching (BPiT) course: a facilitated, virtual, asynchronous course on using a combination of instructional techniques and low- to medium-stakes early assessments to prepare students for success throughout your course. Approaches include priming students’ interest in course subject matter, promoting an effective learning environment, and preparing students to succeed on high-stakes assignments. Participant time: 12 hours over three weeks. Sections to be offered 7/6/20 – 7/26/20. Registration closes June 12 at noon. Please disregard the dates and times below and the dates and times listed in the registration confirmation email. These are for registration purposes and are not the dates/times for the course/participation.
June 12, 2020
A facilitated, virtual, asynchronous course on using best instructional practices in teaching an online courses. Emphasizes building a strong online classroom community, engaging students, and assessing deeper learning, with attention to doing so effectively in large-enrollment sections. Participant time: 6 hours over one week. Sections to be offered weekly, 7/6/20 - 7/26/20. Registration closes June 12 at noon. (Registration will be available later this summer for additional sections to be offered in August.)

Please complete this Survey to select the section in which you want to enroll.

Please disregard the dates and times below and the dates and times listed in the registration confirmation email. These are for registration purposes and are not the dates/times for the course/participation.
June 11, 2020
As the Provost mentioned on May 11th, CSU will prepare to teach online in Summer 2020 and online or hybrid in Fall 2020. TILT (The Institute for Learning and Teaching) is offering a workshop to guide faculty beyond triage to best practices for hybrid and online teaching. This workshop will guide you through the “Recommendations for converting residential courses to online or hybrid delivery” document with an emphasis on essential outcomes and checks for understanding in an online format. This workshop aligns most specifically with Curricular/Curriculum Alignment domain of the CSU Teaching Effectiveness Framework. It has secondary alignment with Pedagogical Content Knowledge. Please bring a copy of your course outcomes and syllabus.

Please register at least 2 days prior to the event so we can send you the zoom information.
June 10, 2020
As the Provost mentioned on May 11th, CSU will prepare to teach online in Summer 2020 and online or hybrid in Fall 2020. TILT (The Institute for Learning and Teaching) is offering a workshop to guide faculty beyond triage to best practices for hybrid and online teaching. This workshop will guide you through the “Recommendations for converting residential courses to online or hybrid delivery” document with an emphasis on essential outcomes and checks for understanding in an online format. This workshop aligns most specifically with Curricular/Curriculum Alignment domain of the CSU Teaching Effectiveness Framework. It has secondary alignment with Pedagogical Content Knowledge. Please bring a copy of your course outcomes and syllabus.

Please register at least 2 days prior to the event so we can send you the zoom information.
June 4, 2020
As the Provost mentioned on May 11th, CSU will prepare to teach online in Summer 2020 and online or hybrid in Fall 2020. TILT (The Institute for Learning and Teaching) is offering a workshop to guide faculty beyond triage to best practices for hybrid and online teaching. This workshop will guide you through the “Recommendations for converting residential courses to online or hybrid delivery” document with an emphasis on essential outcomes and checks for understanding in an online format. This workshop aligns most specifically with Curricular/Curriculum Alignment domain of the CSU Teaching Effectiveness Framework. It has secondary alignment with Pedagogical Content Knowledge.
Please register at least 2 days prior to the event so we can send you the zoom information.
May 27, 2020
As the Provost mentioned on May 11th, CSU will prepare to teach online in Summer 2020 and online or hybrid in Fall 2020. TILT (The Institute for Learning and Teaching) is offering a workshop to guide faculty beyond triage to best practices for hybrid and online teaching. This workshop will guide you through the “Recommendations for converting residential courses to online or hybrid delivery” document with an emphasis on essential outcomes and checks for understanding in an online format. This workshop aligns most specifically with Curricular/Curriculum Alignment domain of the CSU Teaching Effectiveness Framework. It has secondary alignment with Pedagogical Content Knowledge.
Please register at least 2 days prior to the event so we can send you the zoom information.
May 21, 2020
Goals of the session(s): Celebrate faculty for their work (Rick has agreed to give welcome & thanks) Collect data in a methodical way via focus groups. Use data already collected from the KT folks to write questions. Potential types of questions: What support did you get? Not get? Would like more of? How did finals go?
May 21, 2020
Goals of the session(s): Celebrate faculty for their work (Rick has agreed to give welcome & thanks) Collect data in a methodical way via focus groups. Use data already collected from the KT folks to write questions. Potential types of questions: What support did you get? Not get? Would like more of? How did finals go?
April 7, 2020
Conversations About Medical Education – the goal of these sessions is to create a space for conversation around research-based approaches to educating medical students. Selected topics from the medical education literature will be introduced with the goal of considering how the ideas may or may not fit in a veterinary context.
March 13, 2020
The goal behind the TILT Teaching Topics Lunch & Learn sessions is to provide GTAs with a space to discuss aspects of teaching that are salient and timely to them, while sharing knowledge, experience, and strategies with and among each other. Each session includes a facilitated discussion over lunch with fellow GTAs across campus and will conclude with a brief presentation of best practices on the topic at hand along with resources for further learning.

The topic for this first Lunch & Learn is "Drawing Boundaries." Since most GTAs occupy various roles on campus, including student and instructor, drawing boundaries around time, commitments, and various professional relationships can be challenging. We'll use this hour to share knowledge and experience around setting boundaries in their various forms and work together to come up with strategies for moving forward.


If you are having trouble registering for this session via MyLearning, please email Hailey Otis (hailey.otis@colostate.edu)
March 9, 2020
Traditional approaches to syllabus construction treat the syllabus as a "contract" between student and instructor and, as such, often take on a punitive tone, communicating to students the negative consequences of their poor behavior/performance in class. More recently, there has been a turn to "learner-centered" syllabi which, instead of focusing on punishment and what not to do, present students with a roadmap for success in a given course. This workshop will focus on how to build a learner-centered syllabus that puts students and their needs/perspectives/success at the center of the document, positions students and the instructor as part of a partnership, and offers opportunities for shared decision making between students and instructor.
If you have a syllabus you are hoping to make more learner-centered, please bring it to this session as we will dedicate some time to workshopping.


This workshop counts toward the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate.

This Session aligns with the Teaching Effectiveness Framework: Curriculum/Curricular Alignment

If you are having trouble registering for this session via MyLearning, please email Hailey Otis (hailey.otis@colostate.edu)
March 6, 2020
Motivation is triggered by the perceived value or benefit of the academic content or task. Student involvement and commitment to learning increases when an instructor uses a variety of researched motivation techniques.

After completing the session on Student Motivation, learners will:
Apply growth mindset to classroom techniques that support student learning;
Examine their own mindset as an instructor;
Describe self-efficacy and know how to use its constructs to increase students’ self-efficacy;
Apply researched motivation techniques to match student needs;
Promote motivation through instructional processes.

This session aligns with the Teaching Effectiveness Framework - Student Motivation.

If you are having trouble registering for this session via MyLearning, please email Hailey Otis (hailey.otis@colostate.edu
March 3, 2020
Conversations About Medical Education – the goal of these sessions is to create a space for conversation around research-based approaches to educating medical students. Selected topics from the medical education literature will be introduced with the goal of considering how the ideas may or may not fit in a veterinary context.
March 2, 2020
Description: Motivation is triggered by the perceived value or benefit of the academic content or task. Student involvement and commitment to learning increases when an instructor uses a variety of researched motivation techniques. After completing the 1-hour session on student motivation, learners will:
• Describe the role neurotransmitters have on motivation
• Know growth mindset language in classrooms that supports student learning
• Examine personal self-talk strategies and their utility in fostering a growth mindset
• Describe the 4 self-efficacy sources
• Connect self-efficacy sources with growth mindset language
• Be aware of the TILT resources on motivation

Lunch registration: https://forms.gle/nKPb2SHmUUdWp9LS6 - please register by COB, Monday, Feb. 24th.
Lunch will be from Spoons.
February 26, 2020
In this session “Introduction to Classroom Climate” we will gain an understanding of techniques to create a more welcoming environment including the intellectual, social, emotional, and physical environment in which students learn. It is the responsibility of the instructor to intentionally create a safe space to foster a community of learners. Increase skills in creating group norms.

After completing the session on classroom climate, learners will:
Create a welcoming space for students; Be familiar with techniques that create a positive and inclusive climate for all students; Be familiar with techniques for undergraduate students to engage with each other and their instructor; Be able to describe: sense of belonging, mattering, how they relate, and how they support classroom climate; Increase skills in creating group norms; Gain strategies that help set up students for success; and Use self-reflection to improve teaching practice.

“Even though some of us might wish to conceptualize our classrooms as culturally neutral or might choose to ignore the cultural dimensions, students cannot check their sociocultural identities at the door, nor can they instantly transcend their current level of development.” (Ambrose, et al, How Learning Works, 2010, p 169/170).

This session aligns with the Teaching Effectiveness Framework - Classroom Climate

If you are having trouble registering for this session via MyLearning, please email Hailey Otis (hailey.otis@colostate.edu)
February 20, 2020
This learning opportunity is a blended model with 3 face to face meetings and 2 facilitated online modules (each of which spans 3 weeks). The 2 modules you will experience are: First Four Weeks and Classroom Climate.

The First Four Weeks module focuses on supporting students with engagement strategies. This module provides strategies to help students learn more effectively and build The vision for this module relates to building students’ academic confidence that will carry them through their four years and beyond.

Classroom climate refers to the perceptions students have of the intellectual, social, and emotional space in which they are to learn and create relationships among peers and with the instructor. The Classroom Climate module focuses on ways to have students feel respected, included, and safe enough to be able to challenge their own learning (including when they make errors). This module is rooted in developing a sense of belonging and provides strategies for students to take ownership of their learning.

Each of these modules will provide you, the learner, with a chance to learn new tools and try those tools in your setting. You will also reflect on those new practices and what those mean for you, as an instructor, and for your students.

Details:

The expectation for participation is that you will attend all 3 face to face sessions and actively engage with the 2 online modules. Participation will count as 2 sessions for the GTA certificate program.

Face to face meetings (each in the TILT Building room 104)
Thursday, February 20 from 3:00 to 4:00 Kick off meeting
Wednesday, March 25 from 9:30-10:30 Mid point meeting
Thursday, April 23 from 11:30-1:00 Wrap Up meeting (lunch included)

Online Modules
First Four Weeks: week of Feb 24 through week of March 9
Classroom Climate: week of April 30 through week of April 13

If you are having trouble registering for this session via MyLearning, please email Hailey Otis (hailey.otis@colostate.edu)
February 20, 2020
In this session “Introduction to Active Learning we will explore different Instructional Strategies that are varied increase engagement, critical thinking, relevant connections and success for all learners.

After completing the session on instructional strategies, learners will:
Expand your set of instructional strategies to use when teaching; Match instructional strategies with content and students’ needs; and Apply classroom management techniques to chosen instructional strategies.
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning. It will also cover how to incorporate visual, auditory, and kinesthetic activities into your studying.
This Session aligns with the Teaching Effectiveness Framework: Instructional Strategies

If you are having trouble registering for this session via MyLearning, please email Hailey Otis (hailey.otis@colostate.edu
February 13, 2020
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance. Please bring along your laptop or any teaching philosophy materials you'd like to work on. Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part II which will include the following: Time to develop a new teaching philosophy or workshop an existing teaching philosophy An opportunity to ask questions/seek guidance from TILT Professional Development staff If you want more information on the basics of writing a teaching philosophy before you begin workshopping yours, please register for Part I as well.
If you attend both parts, lunch will be served during the transition from Part I to Part II.
February 13, 2020
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part I which will include the following:
An overview of the research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
An overview of the basic structure and central information that should be included
Ideas for strategies from CSU faculty and what they look for in a Teaching Philosophy.

If you also want to spend time developing and/or workshopping your own Teaching Philosophy, please register for Part II as well.
If you attend both parts, lunch will be served during the transition from Part I to Part II.

This Session aligns with the Teaching Effectiveness Framework: Classroom Climate

If you are having trouble registering for this session via MyLearning, please email Hailey Otis (hailey.otis@colostate.edu)
February 4, 2020
Conversations About Medical Education – the goal of these sessions is to create a space for conversation around research-based approaches to educating medical students. Selected topics from the medical education literature will be introduced with the goal of considering how the ideas may or may not fit in a veterinary context.
December 10, 2019
The Colorado Commission on Higher Education recently released their Equity Toolkit. This set of online reading and discussion modules on inclusive teaching and learning uses evidence-based practices to help us engage in self-inquiry, build community and design and implement inclusive courses. In preparation for the CAS Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Summit to be held Thursday January 23rd 2020, members of the Diversity Catalyst Team will present an overview of the Toolkit and engage us in active learning demonstrations. A key learning objective for the session will be to develop a plan to use these resources in continuing work over break and through next semester. This session is open to all CAS members. Teachers at all levels are particularly encouraged to attend.
November 20, 2019
This session aims to discuss the data on the use and misuse of student course surveys. An update of the status, progress, and aims of the CSU course survey redesign will also be discussed.
Goals and Objectives:
1. Discuss what student course feedback can (and cannot) tell us about the teaching-learning environment.
2. Share an update on the CSU course survey redesign efforts, including the challenges of use and misuse of the data.

This seminar counts toward the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate.
November 18, 2019
This experience ties together all of the previous sessions and provides time to examine growth and plan for the future.
November 12, 2019
The idea behind this session would be to showcase the different opportunities that are available to encourage students to discuss their research in an ‘elevator talk’ format using non jargon terminology, in a fast (30 second) way that engages their non-science/non-major peers and other lay persons. The second aspect to this session is to break apart primary literature to show students how to assess what the paper is saying into three parts: What is known previously (they say), what the authors discovered (I say/we say), and why it contributes to the field (so what). This is a simple exercise that will help students compartmentalize primary research into manageable portions, as well as set a foundation to critically assess primary research articles.

Learning Objectives for this Session include:

  • Identify ways to encourage students to discuss their research in nontechnical terms (the elevator talk)
  • Examine why elevator talks are an important skill for scientists of all levels to master
  • Discuss the difficulty of learning how to read primary research articles
  • Break down the abstract of a paper using ‘they say, I say/we say, and so what’ approach

November 11, 2019
Frequent formative assessments and low stakes assignments inform instructors and students of how much, and the extent to which, content or skills are mastered. Teaching strategies can then be adjusted to meet students’ needs, integrating a variety of assessment strategies provides all students with multiple opportunities to succeed.

After completing the two sessions on Feedback and Assessment strategies, learners will:

  • Define the difference between formative and summative assessments and their purposes
  • Align formative and summative assessment strategies with course outcomes
  • Choose or design a rubric that uses specific, measurable, student-friendly language
  • Identify opportunities so that feedback is a regular aspect of the student experience
There is an expectation that you will attend both sessions on November 4 and November 11.
November 5, 2019
Faculty job postings are increasingly asking for diversity statements, in addition to research and teaching statements. The purpose of which is to identify candidates who have professional skills, experience and/or willingness to engage in activities that would enhance campus diversity and equity efforts. Join Dr. Shannon Archibeque-Engle for a workshop on how you can write a diversity statement that accurately reflects your record of contributions to diversity and equity as well as your commitment to future efforts.
This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
November 4, 2019 - November 11, 2019
Frequent formative assessments and low stakes assignments inform instructors and students of how much, and the extent to which, content or skills are mastered. Teaching strategies can then be adjusted to meet students’ needs, integrating a variety of assessment strategies provides all students with multiple opportunities to succeed.

After completing the two sessions on Feedback and Assessment strategies, learners will:

  • Define the difference between formative and summative assessments and their purposes
  • Align formative and summative assessment strategies with course outcomes
  • Choose or design a rubric that uses specific, measurable, student-friendly language
  • Identify opportunities so that feedback is a regular aspect of the student experience
There is an expectation that you will attend both sessions on November 4 and November 11.
October 28, 2019
Inclusive Pedagogy is a student centered teaching approach that considers all students’ backgrounds, experiences, and learning variabilities in the planning and implementation of student engagement activities, equitable access to content, mutual respect, and a more robust learning experience for all learners.

After completing the two sessions on Inclusive Pedagogy, learners will:

  • Recognize their own implicit biases, how to mitigate those biases, and be aware of the impact those biases can have on learners in the classroom
  • Incorporate a variety of instructional strategies that include the voices of all students
  • Know and practice inclusive language that supports student learning
  • Design opportunities for students to feel safe to engage with each other
  • Be more aware of course materials that reflects the diversity of contributors to the field
  • Direct students to CSU campus resources to meet their diverse needs
  • There is an expectation that you will attend both sessions on October 21 and October 28.
October 24, 2019
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance. Please bring along your laptop or any teaching philosophy materials you'd like to work on.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part II which will include the following:
Time to develop a new teaching philosophy or workshop an existing teaching philosophy
An opportunity to ask questions/seek guidance from TILT Professional Development staff

If you want more information on the basics of writing a teaching philosophy before you begin workshopping yours, please register for Part I as well.
October 24, 2019
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part I which will include the following:
An overview of the research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
An overview of the basic structure and central information that should be included
Ideas for strategies from CSU faculty and what they look for in a Teaching Philosophy.

If you also want to spend time developing and/or workshopping your own Teaching Philosophy, please register for Part Part II as well.
October 21, 2019 - October 28, 2019
Inclusive Pedagogy is a student centered teaching approach that considers all students’ backgrounds, experiences, and learning variabilities in the planning and implementation of student engagement activities, equitable access to content, mutual respect, and a more robust learning experience for all learners.

After completing the two sessions on Inclusive Pedagogy, learners will:

  • Recognize their own implicit biases, how to mitigate those biases, and be aware of the impact those biases can have on learners in the classroom
  • Incorporate a variety of instructional strategies that include the voices of all students
  • Know and practice inclusive language that supports student learning
  • Design opportunities for students to feel safe to engage with each other
  • Be more aware of course materials that reflects the diversity of contributors to the field
  • Direct students to CSU campus resources to meet their diverse needs
  • There is an expectation that you will attend both sessions on October 21 and October 28.
October 16, 2019
This session aims to share a framework for constructive mentoring of effective teaching and thoughts/tools on how best to provide and utilize constructive feedback.
Goals and Objectives:
1. Discuss how "Teaching Effectiveness" has been framed.
2. Share models of how to combine evaluation and mentoring with an aim of excellence in the teaching-learning environment.
This seminar counts toward the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate. Please note: All 7 domains of the Teaching Effectiveness Framework are covered in this session.
October 14, 2019
Instructional Strategies that are varied increase engagement, critical thinking, relevant connections and success for all learners.

After completing the two sessions on instructional strategies, learners will:

  • Have an increased set of instructional strategies to draw on when teaching
  • Match instructional strategies with content and students’ needs
  • Apply classroom management techniques to chosen instructional strategies
  • There is an expectation that you will attend both sessions on October 7 & October 14th.
October 7, 2019 - October 14, 2019
Instructional Strategies that are varied increase engagement, critical thinking, relevant connections and success for all learners.

After completing the two sessions on instructional strategies, learners will:

  • Have an increased set of instructional strategies to draw on when teaching
  • Match instructional strategies with content and students’ needs
  • Apply classroom management techniques to chosen instructional strategies
  • There is an expectation that you will attend both sessions on October 7 & October 14th.
October 3, 2019
Engaged students are successful students, but with the demands on student time and attention, engagement can be a tricky goal. In this session, I will share some ideas for changes that you can make—right now—in your class to increase engagement by making your topics real and relatable and by making the learning social and supported. This will be an active session; come prepared to share insights and to brainstorm practical strategies in small groups.
This workshop counts toward the 12 required for the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate.
September 30, 2019
Motivation is triggered by the perceived value or benefit of the academic content or task. Student involvement and commitment to learning increases when an instructor uses a variety of researched motivation techniques. AFTER COMPLETING THE TWO SESSIONS ON STUDENT MOTIVATION, LEARNERS WILL: Apply growth mindset to classroom techniques that support student learning Examine their own mindset as an instructor Describe self-efficacy and know how to use its constructs to increase students’ self-efficacy Apply researched motivation techniques to match student needs There is an expectation that you will attend both sessions on September 23 & 30.
September 24, 2019
Peer Instruction is a research-based, interactive teaching strategy that can easily be integrated into the large lecture or small group settings as a means of increasing student engagement and comprehension. During this seminar, we will explore Peer Instruction as a teaching and learning strategy and discuss the research-based evidence for its effectiveness.
Lunch will be provided.
This seminar counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
September 23, 2019 - September 30, 2019
Motivation is triggered by the perceived value or benefit of the academic content or task. Student involvement and commitment to learning increases when an instructor uses a variety of researched motivation techniques.

After completing the two sessions on Student Motivation, learners will:

  • Apply growth mindset to classroom techniques that support student learning
  • Examine their own mindset as an instructor
  • Describe self-efficacy and know how to use its constructs to increase students’ self-efficacy
  • Apply researched motivation techniques to match student needs
  • There is an expectation that you will attend both sessions on September 23 & 30.
September 20, 2019
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance. Please bring along your laptop or any teaching philosophy materials you'd like to work on.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part II which will include the following:
Time to develop a new teaching philosophy or workshop an existing teaching philosophy
An opportunity to ask questions/seek guidance from TILT Professional Development staff

If you want more information on the basics of writing a teaching philosophy before you begin workshopping yours, please register for Part I as well.
If you stay for Parts I and II, lunch will be served as we transition into Part II.
September 20, 2019
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part I which will include the following:
An overview of the research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
An overview of the basic structure and central information that should be included
Ideas for strategies from CSU faculty and what they look for in a Teaching Philosophy.

If you also want to spend time developing and/or workshopping your own Teaching Philosophy, please register for Part Part II as well.
If you stay for Parts I and II, lunch will be served as we transition into Part II.
September 17, 2019
Given the dramatic increase in Mental Health Issues on college campuses, Janelle Patrias of the CSU Health Network will lead a workshop on Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress. The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health. The faculty version models an effective interaction between a faculty member and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important. A combination of learning modalities is used, including a realistic filmed scenario, participant discussion and a review of response options and campus resources. TILT will provide lunch for this session
September 9, 2019 - September 16, 2019
Classroom Climate refers to the intellectual, social, emotional, and physical environment in which students learn. It is the responsibility of the instructor to intentionally create a safe space to foster a community of learners.

After completing the two sessions on classroom climate, learners will:

  • Increase skills in creating group norms
  • Create a welcoming space for students
  • Be familiar with techniques that create a positive and inclusive climate for all students
  • Be familiar with techniques for undergraduate students to engage with each other and their instructor
  • Be able to describe: sense of belonging, mattering, how they relate, and how they support classroom climate
  • Gain strategies that help set up students for success
  • Use self-reflection to improve teaching practice
  • There is an expectation that you will attend both sessions on September 9 & 16.
August 7, 2019
The Canvas Open Lab Drop-in Session is designed for people who would like to update/create their Canvas Course and have access to assistance with any Canvas questions that you may have.
August 6, 2019
Each year Training and Organizational Development, The Institute for Learning and Teaching, Academic Computing & Networking Services, The Assistive Technology Resource Center, Morgan Library, and the Student Disability Center collaborate for Fall Faculty Ramp-Up. A time to learn some new strategies and to get your classes ready for the semester.
August 5, 2019 - August 7, 2019
Each year Training and Organizational Development, The Institute for Learning and Teaching, Academic Computing & Networking Services, The Assistive Technology Resource Center, Morgan Library, and the Student Disability Center collaborate for Fall Faculty Ramp-Up. A time to learn some new strategies and to get your classes ready for the semester.
May 28, 2019 - May 31, 2019
Please consider taking part in the Mobile Summer Institute on Undergraduate STEM Education (MoSI). The MoSI is a new iteration of the renowned National Academies Summer Institute (NASI) founded at the University of Wisconsin-Madison by Jo Handelsman (Yale) and Bill Wood (UC-Boulder, Emeritus). This is an intensive workshop on undergraduate science technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. NASI was developed in response to the National Research Council report, Bio2010, which called for a transformation of science education by improving classroom teaching and attracting diverse students to science.

By the end of the institute, you will have:

  • practiced a variety of evidence-based teaching strategies to improve learning outcomes for all students through workshops, presentations and group work
  • worked as a team to create teaching materials that implement these strategies
  • begun to shift your focus from content and teaching to outcomes and learning
  • practiced peer evaluation to promote reflective teaching practices

The CSU MoSI is funded by the Provost’s Office; the College of Natural Sciences; the College of Health and Human Sciences; the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences; the Walter Scott, Jr. College of Engineering; and The Institute for Learning and Teaching (TILT).

May 27, 2019 - June 16, 2019
Engagement can be one of the most important indicators for a successful online class experience. In this short course, you will explore strategies and tools that encourage three types of engagement: student-to-instructor, student-to-student and student-to-content. You might be interested in this course if:
• You would like to gain some experience as an online instructor.
• You would like to gain some experience with a learning management system.
• You’re interested in learning how to improve your online facilitation skills.
Please note: TILT recently restructured its short-course offerings. This course takes the place of the courses Best Practices: Introduction to Online Course Design and Best Practices: Building a Learning Community in an Online Course. You’re welcome to register for this course, but if you’ve take one or both of the other courses, some of the information may be repetitive.
May 23, 2019
TILT would like to announce the 2019 Summer Conference on May 22 and 23 in the Lory Student Center. This year's theme will be addressed by two keynote speakers, Dr. Terrell Strayhorn and Dr. Sarah Eddy. The annual summer conference is free and open to all CSU faculty, staff, and graduate students.
May 22, 2019 - May 23, 2019
TILT would like to announce the 2019 Summer Conference on May 22 and 23 in the Lory Student Center. This year's theme will be addressed by two keynote speakers, Dr. Terrell Strayhorn and Dr. Sarah Eddy. The annual summer conference is free and open to all CSU faculty, staff, and graduate students.
April 30, 2019
"Entering Mentoring" addresses best practices in mentoring including maintaining effective communication, aligning mentee/mentor expectations, equity and inclusion, promoting mentee research and educational self-efficacy, fostering independence and creation of mentee individual development plans. In this CNS MTI session, we will participate in two case studies to explore expectations for mentor-mentee relationships and promoting mentee professional development to Individual Development Plans (IDPs). We hope to provide a taste of and for what can be gained by participating in the nine Entering Mentoring workshop series. Please RSVP to cns_info@colostate.edu by Monday, April 22, 2019.
April 22, 2019
Your syllabus serves to set the foundation of your course. While there are wide-range of “best practices” available to guide you, in this workshop you will have an opportunity to fine tune your syllabus to align with both your teaching persona and philosophy. Often, we model the format, curriculum, and language of past syllabi. This workshop gives you a chance to reflect on whether or not you are modeling the language, expectations, and tone that will elevate the quality of your course. We will cover some “musts,” but we will focus greater attention on making thoughtful choices around language, policies, and other opportunities to leverage the syllabus as a document to galvanize community. This workshop is not designed to address content/curriculum choices, but we will talk about some fundamental “decolonizing” principles for future exploration.

Please come prepared with a copy of a syllabus that you currently use or are working on for your teaching portfolio. Working with an existing syllabus is key to this workshop. If you don't have a syllabus of your own, please bring one you're familiar with (from a class you've TA'd for or taken).
Please also come prepared with your teaching persona in mind and a copy of your teaching philosophy (if you have one).

This is the third installment in TILT Peer2Peer Workshop Series which allows graduate students to share their knowledge, interest, and research as related to teaching and pedagogy. This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate. Lunch will be provided.
April 19, 2019
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
Please bring along your laptop or any teaching philosophy materials you'd like to work on.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part II which will include the following:
Time to develop a new teaching philosophy or workshop an existing teaching philosophy
An opportunity to ask questions/seek guidance from TILT Professional Development staff

If you want more information on the basics of writing a teaching philosophy before you begin workshopping yours, please register for Part Ias well.
If you stay for Parts I and II, lunch will be served as we transition into Part II.
April 19, 2019
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part I which will include the following:
An overview of the research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
An overview of the basic structure and central information that should be included
Ideas for strategies from CSU faculty and what they look for in a Teaching Philosophy.

If you also want to spend time developing and/or workshopping your own Teaching Philosophy, please register for Part II as well.
If you stay for Parts I and II, lunch will be served as we transition into Part II.
April 16, 2019
This session aims to discuss the data on the use and misuse of student course surveys. An update of the status, progress, and aims of the CSU course survey redesign will also be discussed.
Goals and Objectives:
1. Discuss what student course feedback can (and cannot) tell us about the teaching-learning environment.
2. Share an update on the CSU course survey redesign efforts, including the challenges of use and misuse of the data.
April 15, 2019
The National Association of System Heads (NASH) is sponsoring a webinar with Mary-Ann Winkelmes on Transparent Assignment Design. All members of the campus community are invited. Mary-Ann is the founder and director of the Transparency in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education Project (TILT Higher Ed). Transparent instruction is an inclusive, equitable teaching practice that can enhance High Impact Practices by making learning processes explicit and promoting student success equitably. A 2016 AAC&U study (Winkelmes et al.) identifies transparent assignment design as a small, easily replicable teaching intervention that significantly enhances students' success, with greater gains by historically underserved students. A 2018 study suggests those benefits can boost students' retention rates for up to two years. In this session we'll review the findings and examine some sample assignments. Then we’ll apply the research to revising some class activities and assignments. Participants will leave with a draft assignment or activity for one of their courses, and a concise set of strategies for designing transparent assignments that promote students’ learning equitably.
April 12, 2019
Drawing from Stanford researchers Bill Burnett and Dave Evans’ principles in Designing Your Life, participants will be guided through professional self-reflection and vision boarding activities in order to reflect upon the spring semester, set goals for the summer, and develop an implementation plan for the fall. If you have crafting supplies you would like to use, you are welcome to bring them. Magazines, markers, and big sticky pads will be available for visioning and goal setting.
April 4, 2019
Engaged students are successful students, but with the demands on student time and attention, engagement can be a tricky goal. In this session, I will share some ideas for changes that you can make—right now—in your class to increase engagement by making your topics real and relatable and by making the learning social and supported. This will be an active session; come prepared to share insights and to brainstorm practical strategies in small groups.
This workshop counts toward the 12 required for the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate.
March 28, 2019
Given the dramatic increase in Mental Health Issues on college campuses, Janelle Patrias of the CSU Health Network will lead a workshop on Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress. The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health. The faculty version models an effective interaction between a faculty member and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important. A combination of learning modalities is used, including a realistic filmed scenario, participant discussion and a review of response options and campus resources.
March 25, 2019
he Latin word “persona” most directly translates to “mask.” What kind of mask should we wear while teaching? Should we wear a mask while teaching? How much of our teaching persona should be our authentic personality and how much of it should be a mask? How do we develop a teaching style that works for us as instructors and is also conducive to student learning? These questions are particularly salient for Graduate Teaching Assistants who may not be much older than their students and/or may not perceive themselves as having much more experience than their students. Together, we will explore what it means to put on a mask and to embrace a persona that strikes the right balance between your authentic self and the masked authority figure needed to effectively manage a classroom.
This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
March 12, 2019
This session aims to share a framework for constructive mentoring of effective teaching and thoughts/tools on how best to provide and utilize constructive feedback.
Goals and Objectives:
1. Discuss how "Teaching Effectiveness" has been framed.
2. Share models of how to combine evaluation and mentoring with an aim of excellence in the teaching-learning environment.
March 8, 2019
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
Please bring along your laptop or any teaching philosophy materials you'd like to work on.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part II which will include the following:
Time to develop a new teaching philosophy or workshop an existing teaching philosophy
An opportunity to ask questions/seek guidance from TILT Professional Development staff

If you want more information on the basics of writing a teaching philosophy before you begin workshopping yours, please register for Part I as well.
If you stay for Parts I and II, lunch will be served as we transition into Part II.
March 8, 2019
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part I which will include the following:
An overview of the research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
An overview of the basic structure and central information that should be included
Ideas for strategies from CSU faculty and what they look for in a Teaching Philosophy.

If you also want to spend time developing and/or workshopping your own Teaching Philosophy, please register for Part II as well.
If you stay for Parts I and II, lunch will be served as we transition into Part II.
February 26, 2019
Writing good learning outcomes drives effective teaching and naturally leads to the writing of good exam questions. In this presentation, we will discuss the nuts and bolts of writing good learning outcomes that are both actionable and measurable. You will gain practice writing your own learning outcomes and exam questions with feedback from me and your peers.
February 22, 2019
Given the dramatic increase in Mental Health Issues on college campuses, Janelle Patrias of the CSU Health Network will lead a workshop on Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress. The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health. The faculty version models an effective interaction between a faculty member and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important. A combination of learning modalities is used, including a realistic filmed scenario, participant discussion and a review of response options and campus resources.
February 15, 2019
Peer Instruction is a research-based, interactive teaching strategy that can easily be integrated into the large lecture or small group settings as a means of increasing student engagement and comprehension. During this seminar, we will explore Peer Instruction as a teaching and learning strategy and discuss the research-based evidence for its effectiveness.
Lunch will be provided.
This seminar counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
November 27, 2018
This session aims to discuss the data on the use and misuse of student course surveys. An update of the status, progress, and aims of the CSU course survey redesigtn will also be discussed.
Goals and Objectives:
1. Discuss what student course feedback can (and cannot) tell us about the teaching-learning environment.
2. Share an update on the CSU course survey redesign efforts, including the challenges of use and misuse of the data.
November 26, 2018
Session 2 - • Yoga with Haley Westmoreland – Discover the importance of moving & connecting with your body, especially being a student & being sedentary for so long. Meet at the TILT Building in Room 105. No previous yoga experience necessary. Bringing a mat or towel is encouraged, but not necessary! Refreshments & reflection to follow this practice.
November 15, 2018
Please join Dr. Boscan & Dr. West for this MTI Luncheon discussion on practical strategies for using simulated environments for learning. . Lunch is available (courtesy of the TILT Master Teacher Initiative).
November 12, 2018
I am excited to announce that we are working on scheduling our Spring 2019 series of workshops and seminars that will count toward the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate. We are in the beginning stages of planning a series of Peer-to-Peer workshops where graduate students like yourselves, including yourselves, have an opportunity to research teaching topics that excite and enthuse you and present those topics in the form of workshops to your peers. That’s right, we want to learn from you all about how to be better teachers! We know you care about teaching and we know you know how to research best pedagogical practices and we want to give you an opportunity to share that knowledge and care with your peers. Not only will this be a fantastic chance to share knowledge and network with your peers but it is also great experience to put on a resume or CV!

At this point, we would like to gather those of you who are interested in such an opportunity for an informational session where we can share with you our vision for the Peer-to-Peer Workshop Series and get an idea of the kinds of topics you all might like to present on.
Please RSVP here if you are interested in attending this informational session.

*This informational session does not count toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate requirements itself, but if you end up presenting a Peer-to-Peer workshop, that will count toward the certificate.
November 12, 2018
Please join Dr. Boscan & Dr. West for this MTI Luncheon discussion on practical strategies for using simulated environments for learning. . Lunch is available (courtesy of the TILT Master Teacher Initiative).
November 6, 2018
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
Please bring along your laptop or any teaching philosophy materials you'd like to work on.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part II which will include the following:
Time to develop a new teaching philosophy or workshop an existing teaching philosophy
An opportunity to ask questions/seek guidance from TILT Professional Development staff

If you want more information on the basics of writing a teaching philosophy before you begin workshopping yours, please register for Part I as well.
November 6, 2018
The Graduate School develops a series of free professional development events each fall and spring semester. Students are encouraged to register at col.st/vvU2X for the current sessions.
November 6, 2018
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part I which will include the following:
An overview of the research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
An overview of the basic structure and central information that should be included
Ideas for strategies from CSU faculty and what they look for in a Teaching Philosophy.

If you also want to spend time developing and/or workshopping your own Teaching Philosophy, please register for Part II as well.
October 23, 2018
Students (and their family members) who are undocumented are invaluable members of our Ram Family. This interactive session will provide participants with historical and present day information re: the broader socio-political situation, personal stories of strength and courage, and information re: what CSU does(and you can do specifically) to support students (and their family members) who are undocumented.
October 22, 2018
Please join Dr. Matt Johnston for this MTI Luncheon discussion about assessing student learning. Lunch is available (courtesy of the TILT Master Teacher Initiative).
October 19, 2018
Peer Instruction is a research-based, interactive teaching strategy that can easily be integrated into the large lecture or small group settings as a means of increasing student engagement and comprehension. During this seminar, we will explore Peer Instruction as a teaching and learning strategy and discuss the research-based evidence for its effectiveness.
Lunch will be provided.
This seminar counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
October 18, 2018
Faculty job postings are increasingly asking for diversity statements, in addition to research and teaching statements. The purpose of which is to identify candidates who have professional skills, experience and/or willingness to engage in activities that would enhance campus diversity and equity efforts. Join Dr. Shannon Archibeque-Engle for a workshop on how you can write a diversity statement that accurately reflects your record of contributions to diversity and equity as well as your commitment to future efforts.
October 17, 2018
Please join Dr. Matt Johnston for this MTI Luncheon discussion about assessing student learning. Lunch is available (courtesy of the TILT Master Teacher Initiative).
October 16, 2018
When you finish teaching a lesson, or unit, or course, how do you know how effective you were? What does effective teaching even look like? And what can you do to improve your effectiveness? Join instructional designers from TILT who will share with you the work they have been doing around defining and developing teaching effectiveness at CSU. This hands-on workshop will bring you through a process of establishing a teaching goal, creating action steps to carry out the goal, and assessing progress toward that goal.
LUNCH REQUEST: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/WGHDCJ5 Closes COB, Wednesday, Oct. 10 (or when max number of lunches available are requested)
October 16, 2018
This session aims to share a framework for constructive mentoring of effective teaching and thoughts/tools on how best to provide and utilize constructive feedback.
Goals and Objectives:
1. Discuss how "Teaching Effectiveness" has been framed.
2. Share models of how to combine evaluation and mentoring with an aim of excellence in the teaching-learning environment.
October 9, 2018
The Latin word “persona” most directly translates to “mask.” What kind of mask should we wear while teaching? Should we wear a mask while teaching? How much of our teaching persona should be our authentic personality and how much of it should be a mask? How do we develop a teaching style that works for us as instructors and is also conducive to student learning? These questions are particularly salient for Graduate Teaching Assistants who may not be much older than their students and/or may not perceive themselves as having much more experience than their students. Together, we will explore what it means to put on a mask and to embrace a persona that strikes the right balance between your authentic self and the masked authority figure needed to effectively manage a classroom.
Lunch will be provided.
This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
October 4, 2018
Have you been wondering how you might engage department alumni with current students? In this workshop, learn about a video project where the presenter invited early career professionals to record themselves talking through one specific expectation they had for their career and how it did/did not play out in the work force, affording students the opportunity to problem solve how they would approach a similar situation. The presenter will share design materials as well as video clips for helping you to create your own scenario-based approach to teaching through engagement between alumni and students.
October 1, 2018
Your syllabus is an overview and plan for the course. Writing your syllabus purposefully may provide tools that help improve student learning. This workshop will provide an open discussion of why and how to customize your syllabus for results.
September 26, 2018
The Graduate School develops a series of free professional development events each fall and spring semester. Students are encouraged to register at col.st/vvU2X for the current sessions.
September 25, 2018
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
Please bring along your laptop or any teaching philosophy materials you'd like to work on.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part II which will include the following:
Time to develop a new teaching philosophy or workshop an existing teaching philosophy
An opportunity to ask questions/seek guidance from TILT Professional Development staff

If you want more information on the basics of writing a teaching philosophy before you begin workshopping yours, please register for Part I as well.
September 25, 2018
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part I which will include the following:
An overview of the research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
An overview of the basic structure and central information that should be included
Ideas for strategies from CSU faculty and what they look for in a Teaching Philosophy.

If you also want to spend time developing and/or workshopping your own Teaching Philosophy, please register for Part II as well.
September 19, 2018
Please join Dr. Andrew West to explore ways to design assessments to impact students' long-term retention of ideas. Lunch is available (courtesy of the TILT Master Teacher Initiative) Hope to see you there!
September 18, 2018
Peer Instruction is a research-based, interactive teaching strategy that can easily be integrated into the large lecture or small group settings as a means of increasing student engagement and comprehension. During this seminar, we will explore Peer Instruction as a teaching and learning strategy and discuss the research-based evidence for its effectiveness.
Lunch will be provided.
This seminar counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
September 12, 2018
Video libraries are a powerful and rapidly expanding communication tool. They drive everything from digital marketing to online education platforms. Aside from a growing audience, they can also save you time from having to produce the same lesson year after year. By replacing clips from a central library, you will be able to cut down development time by as much as 20 to 60 percent depending on the clips available.
Please RSVP with Doug Hoffman - Doug.hoffman@colostate.edu
September 10, 2018
Please join Dr. Andrew West to explore ways to design assessments to impact students' long-term retention of ideas. Lunch is available (courtesy of the TILT Master Teacher Initiative) Hope to see you there!
August 13, 2018
GTA Training
August 7, 2018 - August 9, 2018
This year’s faculty fall ramp-up will be held from Aug 7-9 and will feature updates on classroom technologies and using these for your teaching. If you use Echo360 for class recording, don’t miss the Wednesday Luncheon and Office Hours with our Echo Rep.

List of Fall Ramp-Up Sessions 2018:

  • Practical Strategies for Developing a Growth Mindset in Your Students
  • Introduction: Build a Course in Canvas
  • Looking Sharp with Touch Screen Technologies
  • Access for All: Partnering with Student Disability Center to Support Disabled Students
  • CSU LENS: focused on providing Evidence Based Student Feedback
  • Use PlayPosit in Canvas to Create Interactive Videos
  • Best Practice for PowerPoint Presentations
  • Grader and Getting your Tests Scanned
  • Professional Development Opportunities/Listening Session
  • Work Smarter not Harder: Make your research documents more efficient
  • Energizing PowerPoint with Audio and Animation
  • Students Testing at the UTC and Beyond
  • Best Practices for Student Engagement
  • Echo 360 Intro to Lecture Capture
  • Introduction to Canvas Gradebook
  • Online Course Development, Are you ready?
  • Unizen Engage e-text Platform
  • Creating Qualtrics Surveys
  • Duo: Two Factor Authentication
  • iClickers – Set up in Canvas
  • Best Practices using iClickers
  • E-reserves for your Course and Connect to Canvas
  • Echo Personal Capture for Multi-Modal Teaching
  • Digging Deeper with Data: CSU Learning Analytics
  • Canvas: Create Eye Catching Home Pages with Design Tools

Training and Organizational Development, The Institute for Learning and Teaching, The Technology Training Center, The Assistive Technology Resource Center, Morgan Library, Student Disability Center, CSU Online, and ECHO Personal Capture are collaborating to make this program possible.

May 28, 2018 - June 17, 2018
Designing, developing and teaching an online class can be challenging and requires a unique set of skills, even for the most talented and motivated instructors. How do the online and face-to-face environments differ? How do you keep students engaged in an online environment? What is the best way to build an online community? And, how do you create meaningful online discussions? These questions and more will be answered in this introductory short course. We’ll cover such topics as strategies to manage and facilitate an online class, how to create measureable learning objectives and assignments that align to those objectives, the impact of online course structure on instruction and Universal Design for Learning. Additionally, you’ll discover resources to enhance your online courses, and establish effective online teaching strategies. Best of all, you’ll get hands-on practice as you build a draft learning module in Canvas and experience online learning from the student perspective. A foundation in each of these components will help you provide a superior learning environment for your students.
You might be interested in this course if: • You have little or no experience as an online developer/student/instructor. • You’ve been tasked with developing/teaching an online course for the first time. • You’re curious about online learning and teaching.
This class is part of a series of TILT short courses on best practices for designing, developing and facilitating online courses. The courses can be taken in any order. However, if you don’t have much experience designing and developing an online course, hands-on experience in a learning management system or previous online teaching experience, you may want to take Course 1 before taking Course 3 or Course 4 (both of which will be offered Spring 2019).
May 21, 2018 - May 25, 2018
To learn about the upcoming Mobile Summer Institute, please see: MOSI 2019 Please consider taking part in the Mobile Summer Institute on Undergraduate STEM Education (MoSI). The MoSI is a new iteration of the renowned National Academies Summer Institute (NASI) founded at the University of Wisconsin-Madison by Jo Handelsman (Yale) and Bill Wood (UC-Boulder, Emeritus). This is an intensive workshop on undergraduate science technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. NASI was developed in response to the National Research Council report, Bio2010, which called for a transformation of science education by improving classroom teaching and attracting diverse students to science.

By the end of the institute, you will have:

  • practiced a variety of evidence-based teaching strategies to improve learning outcomes for all students through workshops, presentations and group work
  • worked as a team to create teaching materials that implement these strategies
  • begun to shift your focus from content and teaching to outcomes and learning
  • practiced peer evaluation to promote reflective teaching practices

The CSU MoSI is funded by the Provost’s Office; the College of Natural Sciences; the College of Health and Human Sciences; the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences; the Walter Scott, Jr. College of Engineering; and The Institute for Learning and Teaching (TILT).

Download MoSI 2018 Information

Download MoSI 2018 Appliation Form

May 16, 2018 - May 17, 2018
We are pleased to invite you to the 2018 TILT Summer Conference: Closing the Student Achievement Gap: How Learning Happens and Active Learning Strategies. This annual conference is free and open to all CSU faculty, staff, and graduate students.
May 7, 2018
Mondays First is the “first” in a series of CSU Writes events sponsored by the Women & Gender Collaborative. The title, “Mondays First,” refers both to the gathering time and to the need for faculty and postdocs to privilege their writing when building and enhancing their careers in academe. Each Monday gathering opens with a gender-aware discussion session about writing, academic life, and strategies for supporting each other. This short discussion is then followed by an 1-hour writing session in which participants write “on their own” yet together in a positive and communal space. (Coffee and tea provided)
"Save the Dates" to your calendar. Bring your writing gear, including any materials--books, articles, data, and more that you'll need to write for a session. Bring a friend...or two. Make a plan to begin each month of the spring semester with attention to and support for your research and projects within a gender-aware academic writing community.
NOTE: NO NEED to RSVP for the MONDAY FIRST SESSIONS. Just show up, talk, and write together.
For details, contact Kristina Quynn (quynn@colostate.edu) or go to www.csuwrites.colostate.edu
April 26, 2018
While much scientific literature focuses on the ideas of stigma, health effects, and societal beauty standards, there is little research that attempts to develop a social identity model for those who identify as bigger bodied. As body positive movements continue to gain momentum and the conversation becomes more mainstream, Student Affairs professionals need to be educated and prepared in order to adequately serve student populations. This thesis project utilizes personal interviews, disability and sexuality identity development theories, and queer theory to create a potential framework for fat identity development theory while synthesizing information from existing literature on how fatphobic culture also shapes identity development. Please feel free to bring your lunch along to this session.
April 24, 2018
This session aims to discuss the data on the use and misuse of student course surveys. An update of the status, progress, and aims of the CSU course survey redesigtn will also be discussed.
Goals and Objectives:
1. Discuss what student course feedback can (and cannot) tell us about the teaching-learning environment.
2. Share an update on the CSU course survey redesign efforts, including the challenges of use and misuse of the data.
April 24, 2018
Starting Fall 2017, a group of "dialoguers" from across campus will meet to collectively explore how they understand specific issues related to gender and apply their perspective to their personal and professional lives. The dialogues featured in Collaborative Conversations do more than just highlight the “what” of diversity and inclusion - they also model the “how” of engaging in unscripted, open-ended dialogue to learn from and with one another across our differences. Each Collaborative Conversation features an hour of dialogue with opportunities for audience participation. Four panel participants will explore questions such as: What is it like for a person with a frame on the human spirit to engage with gender-related issues on campus? How might faith, belief, and spirituality inform gender equity on campus? What opportunities exist to develop shared practices for gender equity? This program is a collaborative effort with technical support from CSU Online and The Institute for Teaching & Learning.
April 19, 2018
Move over, millennials – here comes Generation Z! Borrowing bits from generational studies and student development theories, this session is designed to help put graduate teaching assistants into the shoes of our incoming first-year students. We will:
•Learn about the traits and shared experiences that many of Class of 2021 have in common
•Be introduced to the 7 Vectors of Student Development, one of the foundational theories about student growth during the college years
•Share knowledge on ways to relate with our students
•Ignite the spark of curiosity to go forward and learn with, as well as from, our students

About the presenter: Kat Hodgson is a third-year PhD student in Political Science. Before returning to graduate student life, Kat worked in Student Affairs at four different universities. This session is a compilation of the knowledge she gained in these positions. It’s also her way of giving back to the academic community that has enriched her life so greatly.

This is the second installment in TILT Peer2Peer Workshop Series which allows graduate students to share their knowledge, interest, and research as related to teaching and pedagogy.
This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
April 18, 2018
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
Please bring along your laptop or any teaching philosophy materials you'd like to work on.
This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part II which will include the following:
Time to develop a new teaching philosophy or workshop an existing teaching philosophy
An opportunity to ask questions/seek guidance from TILT Professional Development staff

If you want more information on the basics of writing a teaching philosophy before you begin workshopping yours, please register for Part I as well.
April 18, 2018
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part I which will include the following:
An overview of the research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
An overview of the basic structure and central information that should be included
Ideas for strategies from CSU faculty and what they look for in a Teaching Philosophy.

If you also want to spend time developing and/or workshopping your own Teaching Philosophy, please register for Part II as well.
April 18, 2018
As instructors, we often face decisions about how to work with student writers: Do we offer plentiful written comments in the margins or a few targets responses? Do we highlight content, organizational or editing challenges? What about commas? This session will feature a conversation with instructors working with undergraduate writers across four disciplines. Discussion will include methods for engaging students in low stakes, classroom writing as well as strategies for responding to student papers in ways that create meaningful learning.
Lunch will be provided
April 11, 2018
This presentation will offer tips on how to shape your teaching persona through student communications beyond the classroom. How might our responses to student writing shape relationships with students that promote dialogue and learning? How might the emails and Canvas notifications we send create teaching ethos? Instructors from History, Psychology, and Anthropology will discuss ways to build a teaching persona through smart written interactions with students.
Lunch will be provided.
April 10, 2018
Starting Fall 2017, a group of "dialoguers" from across campus will meet to collectively explore how they understand specific issues related to gender and apply their perspective to their personal and professional lives. The dialogues featured in Collaborative Conversations do more than just highlight the “what” of diversity and inclusion - they also model the “how” of engaging in unscripted, open-ended dialogue to learn from and with one another across our differences. Each Collaborative Conversation features an hour of dialogue with opportunities for audience participation. Four panel participants will explore questions such as: What is it like for a person with a frame on the human spirit to engage with gender-related issues on campus? How might faith, belief, and spirituality inform gender equity on campus? What opportunities exist to develop shared practices for gender equity? This program is a collaborative effort with technical support from CSU Online and The Institute for Teaching & Learning.
April 10, 2018
This presentation will examine strategies for connecting with students quickly. Using multiple interpersonal and organizational communication theories, we will discuss how students often approach these short-term interactions with instructors, how instructors can establish an inviting tone in the classroom, and how meaningful connections can be facilitated in order to promote student learning.
April 9, 2018
Peer Instruction is a research-based, interactive teaching strategy that can easily be integrated into the large lecture or small group settings as a means of increasing student engagement and comprehension. During this seminar, we will explore Peer Instruction as a teaching and learning strategy and discuss the research-based evidence for its effectiveness.
Lunch will be provided.
This seminar counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
April 6, 2018
Goals:
1. Find out why learning objectives are critical to effective learning outcomes.
2. Consider what to keep in mind when writing measurable objectives.
3. Walk away with a conceptual toolkit of how to write learning objectives.
4. Practice writing learning objectives.

Come prepared with two topics in a course you plan to teach and something to write or type on. We’ll start this workshop with a very brief overview of how and why to write learning objectives, then you’ll spend most of the hour writing learning objectives for your topics with help from your fellow instructors and a TILT instructional designer. You’ll leave with specific, measurable learning objectives written for your two topics and the tools to write more.

Target Audience: If you are curious about how to use learning objectives in your teaching, this workshop is for you. No experience with writing learning objectives necessary.
April 5, 2018
Are you interested in creating a new course for your department? Explore the hurdles, questions and best practices for designing new courses with a global content. Using their own experiences, speakers will discuss options for pedagogy and processes for negotiating fit within their departments, education abroad, and AAUC. Practical concerns such as financing, staffing, TILT support and other related CSU initiatives will be discussed.
April 2, 2018
Mondays First is the “first” in a series of CSU Writes events sponsored by the Women & Gender Collaborative. The title, “Mondays First,” refers both to the gathering time and to the need for faculty and postdocs to privilege their writing when building and enhancing their careers in academe. Each Monday gathering opens with a gender-aware discussion session about writing, academic life, and strategies for supporting each other. This short discussion is then followed by an 1-hour writing session in which participants write “on their own” yet together in a positive and communal space. (Coffee and tea provided)
"Save the Dates" to your calendar. Bring your writing gear, including any materials--books, articles, data, and more that you'll need to write for a session. Bring a friend...or two. Make a plan to begin each month of the spring semester with attention to and support for your research and projects within a gender-aware academic writing community.
NOTE: NO NEED to RSVP for the MONDAY FIRST SESSIONS. Just show up, talk, and write together.
For details, contact Kristina Quynn (quynn@colostate.edu) or go to www.csuwrites.colostate.edu
March 28, 2018
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
Please bring along your laptop or any teaching philosophy materials you'd like to work on.
This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part II which will include the following:
Time to develop a new teaching philosophy or workshop an existing teaching philosophy
An opportunity to ask questions/seek guidance from TILT Professional Development staff

If you want more information on the basics of writing a teaching philosophy before you begin workshopping yours, please register for Part I as well.
March 28, 2018
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty positions. This two-part workshop will give you the opportunity to learn about best practices in creating a teaching philosophy and/or give you time to develop/workshop your own teaching philosophy with TILT Professional Development staff available for guidance.
This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate.

Registering for this part of the event gives you access to part I which will include the following:
An overview of the research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
An overview of the basic structure and central information that should be included
Ideas for strategies from CSU faculty and what they look for in a Teaching Philosophy.

If you also want to spend time developing and/or workshopping your own Teaching Philosophy, please register for Part II as well.
March 28, 2018
In our interactions with students and colleagues, we are doing significant work navigating the differences between ourselves and others. Sometimes being ourselves is easy; at other times, it can be quite challenging. When we see ourselves as significantly different from those we interact with on a daily basis, the challenges of self and other can be intimidating. However, our presentation of self can also be a resource for building trust, being a role model, and navigating difficult conversations. In this MTI Luncheon, we will discuss the practical challenges of the self and how to use the self to our advantage.
March 27, 2018
This session aims to discuss the data on the use and misuse of student course surveys. An update of the status, progress, and aims of the CSU course survey redesigtn will also be discussed.
Goals and Objectives: 1. Discuss what student course feedback can (and cannot) tell us about the teaching-learning environment. 2. Share an update on the CSU course survey redesign efforts, including the challenges of use and misuse of the data.
March 27, 2018
This panel addresses the apathy we often see in student responses to writing assignments: extra wide margins, just three lines on the required fifth page, unusually large fonts, rush jobs, and poorly edited final papers. Panelists will share (and invite you to share) stories of student writing reluctance and apathy--and share some tips on how to work around and through these challenges in order to help students recognize the necessity of strong writing communication skills in any field.
Lunch will be provided
March 27, 2018
This session will include parenting experts who have it all figured out and never ever mess anything up. Just kidding. Let’s be real, being a parent/guardian/auntie/influencer-of-small-humans is hard-freakin-work. From the seemingly constant need to educate them about All. Of. The. Things. (seriously, why can’t they come pre-programed??), to the profound pressure to not only keep them alive but also grow them into the kind, compassionate and socially conscious adults needed to lead our movements. Even the most well-intentioned of us struggle for guidance when it comes to issues of privilege and oppression and most “parenting" books don't take identity into account while doling out advice. In this session we will NOT give advice. Rather, will explore some of the strategies that parents use while attempting to raise socially conscious humans. While this session isn't only for parents, it is intended for folks who: 1. have (or will have) some level of direct influence over small humans as parents/family/guardians/teachers/babysitters/etc. and 2. come to the session with a baseline understanding of identity, power and privilege. Please feel free to bring your lunch along to this session.
March 21, 2018
Using theoretical and reflective pedagogical insights, Dr. Aoki will discuss communication practices and listening skills to assist in the development of intercultural communication competencies for learning contexts. More specifically, the talk will address listening practices and language consciousness from a global perspective as well as communication insights from negotiating “mistakes” and conflicts in the university classroom. Finally, Dr. Aoki will share ways he has learned from his students about global inclusivity and cultural mindfulness, over the past twenty years on the CSU campus, to enhance his own evolving reflectiveness and effectiveness as an instructor.
This presentation is open to faculty and graduate students from all disciplines and perspectives.
March 21, 2018
Join Karrin Anderson, Professor of Communication Studies and the former Director of the Public Speaking Course at CSU, as she provides simple, practical strategies for giving an engaging and informative public presentation.
March 21, 2018
Difficult topics, differences of opinion, disagreements, and misunderstandings are all potential parts of any group dynamic. In the context of teaching, opinions may collide, and challenging issues arise by design (in pursuit of the aims of the course in question, and planned by the instructor), but we must also be prepared for difficult conversations to emerge spontaneously. Being prepared as instructors (both for the planned “difficult conversations” and the surprises) is a critical aspect to effective teaching. This session will share some thoughts/observations on how to navigate both the planned and spontaneous moments that involve challenging conversations.
March 21, 2018
This session will feature tips on responding to student writing in ways that build teaching authority, engage students, and promote student learning. Teachers from English and History will share their positive & not-so-positive experiences working with student writing ranging from short in-class writings to exams to longer essays--and the ways that smart response can create strong classroom communities and better writers.
Lunch will be provided.
March 20, 2018
This session aims to share a framework for constructive mentoring of effective teaching and thoughts/tools on how best to provide and utilize constructive feedback.
Goals and Objectives: 1. Discuss how "Teaching Effectiveness" has been framed. 2. Share models of how to combine evaluation and mentoring with an aim of excellence in the teaching-learning environment.
March 20, 2018
Starting Fall 2017, a group of "dialoguers" from across campus will meet to collectively explore how they understand specific issues related to gender and apply their perspective to their personal and professional lives. The dialogues featured in Collaborative Conversations do more than just highlight the “what” of diversity and inclusion - they also model the “how” of engaging in unscripted, open-ended dialogue to learn from and with one another across our differences. Each Collaborative Conversation features an hour of dialogue with opportunities for audience participation. Four panel participants will explore questions such as: What is it like for a person with a frame on the human spirit to engage with gender-related issues on campus? How might faith, belief, and spirituality inform gender equity on campus? What opportunities exist to develop shared practices for gender equity? This program is a collaborative effort with technical support from CSU Online and The Institute for Teaching & Learning.
March 7, 2018
Google found great success in incorporating 20% time into the work week, allowing employees 20% of their work time for collaboration and creativity. The concept of 20% time, sometimes referred to as Genius Hour, has exciting implications for the classroom as well. If you are looking to increase the passion for teaching and learning in your classroom, this presentation will offer some hands-on strategies you can adapt for your own use.
This seminar counts toward the requirements for the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate.
March 6, 2018
Peer Instruction is a research-based, interactive teaching strategy that can easily be integrated into the large lecture or small group settings as a means of increasing student engagement and comprehension. During this seminar, we will explore Peer Instruction as a teaching and learning strategy and discuss the research-based evidence for its effectiveness.
Lunch will be provided.
This seminar counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
March 5, 2018
Mondays First is the “first” in a series of CSU Writes events sponsored by the Women & Gender Collaborative. The title, “Mondays First,” refers both to the gathering time and to the need for faculty and postdocs to privilege their writing when building and enhancing their careers in academe. Each Monday gathering opens with a gender-aware discussion session about writing, academic life, and strategies for supporting each other. This short discussion is then followed by an 1-hour writing session in which participants write “on their own” yet together in a positive and communal space. (Coffee and tea provided)
"Save the Dates" to your calendar. Bring your writing gear, including any materials--books, articles, data, and more that you'll need to write for a session. Bring a friend...or two. Make a plan to begin each month of the spring semester with attention to and support for your research and projects within a gender-aware academic writing community.
NOTE: NO NEED to RSVP for the MONDAY FIRST SESSIONS. Just show up, talk, and write together.
For details, contact Kristina Quynn (quynn@colostate.edu) or go to www.csuwrites.colostate.edu
February 28, 2018
CSU’s international student population has grown and many are interested in best practices supporting students from different parts of the globe. This session will provide a primer on culture and explore aspects of culture and interaction to help explain how the home culture of a student influences interactions. To RSVP, please contact: cns_info@colostate.edu by Thursday, February 22, 2018.
February 27, 2018
Move over, millennials – here comes Generation Z! Borrowing bits from generational studies and student development theories, this session is designed to help put graduate teaching assistants into the shoes of our incoming first-year students. We will:
•Learn about the traits and shared experiences that many of Class of 2021 have in common
•Be introduced to the 7 Vectors of Student Development, one of the foundational theories about student growth during the college years
•Share knowledge on ways to relate with our students
•Ignite the spark of curiosity to go forward and learn with, as well as from, our students

About the presenter: Kat Hodgson is a third-year PhD student in Political Science. Before returning to graduate student life, Kat worked in Student Affairs at four different universities. This session is a compilation of the knowledge she gained in these positions. It’s also her way of giving back to the academic community that has enriched her life so greatly.

This is the second installment in TILT Peer2Peer Workshop Series which allows graduate students to share their knowledge, interest, and research as related to teaching and pedagogy.
This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate. Lunch will be provided.
February 26, 2018
It is important to address diversity in all courses to both create an inclusive classroom environment and to bring issues of diversity and social justice into the curriculum. The use of metaphor can be an important tool for addressing and teaching about inclusion. In this workshop participants will learn several metaphors through experiential leaning to use in their courses. This seminar counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
February 20, 2018
Interactions between undergraduate learning assistants (ULAs) and students have the potential to be a high-impact practice, not only for the ULA, but also for the course students. In this seminar, I hope to show you how I have changed the role of my ULAs from a one that focused on helping me with the administrative tasks in my large enrollment STEM course, to a role that is focused instead on increasing student engagement with the course material, as well as enriching the learning experience for my ULAs.
Lunch will be provided
All CSU faculty, special faculty, and graduate students are invited to attend.
This seminar counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
February 7, 2018
The Latin word “persona” most directly translates to “mask.” What kind of mask should we wear while teaching? Should we wear a mask while teaching? How much of our teaching persona should be our authentic personality and how much of it should be a mask? How do we develop a teaching style that works for us as instructors and is also conducive to student learning? These questions are particularly salient for Graduate Teaching Assistants who may not be much older than their students and/or may not perceive themselves as having much more experience than their students. Together, we will explore what it means to put on a mask and to embrace a persona that strikes the right balance between your authentic self and the masked authority figure needed to effectively manage a classroom.
This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
February 1, 2018
The Rediscovering America workshop traces the historic and ongoing impacts of the Doctrine of Discovery and governmental engagements onto Native American peoples, communities and cultures. Our goal is to raise our level of knowledge and concern about these impacts, recognize them in ourselves and our institutions, and explore how we can begin to take actions towards our collective futures. Please feel free to bring your lunch along to this session.
January 22, 2018
The City of Fort Collins Human Relations Commission in partnership with Poudre River Library District, Connections to Curiosity, Colorado State University's The Institute for Learning and Teaching and the Office of the Vice President for Diversity Cordially invites you to HRC 2018 Lunch Forum. Goals of the Interactive Film Dialogue: Collective Shared Learning; Community Engagement; Identify new ways to collaborate. Intended for those involved in education, government, human services, diversity and inclusion, the judicial system, housing, law enforcement, immigration, social advocacy, public health. Please register at: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdw_1s5A8TvsT48bvPvBQfBTvQmATexwvMEDRSTor9hC5sw0A/viewform?c=0&w=1
December 5, 2017
This workshop will expose participants to helpful models and communication principles for interacting across cultural differences. We might speak a common language, but still have very different ways of interacting depending on our cultural identity and back ground. Learning about cultural patterns can help us interact with our colleagues and serve our students more effectively. Join us in this substantive and interactive session. Lunch will be provided by TILT.
December 5, 2017
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty position. This workshop will give an overview of the research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy, highlight the central information that should be included, and we will share strategies from CSU faculty and what they look for in a Teaching Philosophy. Please bring along your laptop or any teaching philosophy materials you'd like to work on. This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate. Lunch will be provided by TILT.
November 29, 2017
For many of us, when we arrive in front of our class at the semester's start, we see the sea of students most of whom are there because of a requirement. We have expectations for them and they have expectations for them. But did you ever wonder what students are thinking or doing during class? or how they even chose that particular class? Then try being one of them... During Spring 2017, I enrolled in LGER100, German 1, and had the experience of being a student again. In this MTI, I will lead a discussion about student behaviors both on at the basis of my own experiences and drawing from the anthropological study presented in the book My Freshman Year by Rebekah Nathan, and other resources. Please come ready to share your own questions and experiences. I hope you'll join the discussion! Please RSVP to cns_info@colostate.edu by Wednesday, November 22, 2017.
November 14, 2017
Ecology in the 21st century requires cross-disciplinary and international collaboration. This session will explore how to prepare students for those collaborative practices while engaging students in their own learning processes. CSU staculty (faculty and staff who sailed on Semester at Sea) will share what they have learned from engaging students in research, co-curricular experiences, collaborating across divisions, and developing cross-national partnerships. While facilitators will share specific examples of engaged learning, discussion will allow participants to share what methods have worked (or not) as a means of engaging students in global issues and concerns. Lunch will be served.
November 9, 2017
What is Inclusive Pedagogy, why should I care about it, and how can I create it? Inclusive pedagogy is a method of teaching in which educators and students work together to create a supportive and open environment that fosters social justice and allows each individual to be fully present and feel equally valued (Georgetown University, 2017). Research shows that classroom climate impacts student learning, persistence, and well-being; as educators, we have the opportunity to implement diversity and inclusion best practices into our classrooms to maximize student learning. Through this interactive session, strategies, techniques, and personal narratives will be employed to better inform inclusive pedagogical practice. Lunch will be provided by TILT.
November 7, 2017
The Latin word “persona” most directly translates to “mask.” What kind of mask should we wear while teaching? Should we wear a mask while teaching? How much of our teaching persona should be our authentic personality and how much of it should be a mask? How do we develop a teaching style that works for us as instructors and is also conducive to student learning? These questions are particularly salient for Graduate Teaching Assistants who may not be much older than their students and/or may not perceive themselves as having much more experience than their students. Together, we will explore what it means to put on a mask and to embrace a persona that strikes the right balance between your authentic self and the masked authority figure needed to effectively manage a classroom. Lunch will be provided. This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
November 6, 2017
Peer Instruction is a research-based, interactive teaching strategy that can easily be integrated into the large lecture or small group settings as a means of increasing student engagement and comprehension. During this seminar, we will explore Peer Instruction as a teaching and learning strategy and discuss the research-based evidence for its effectiveness.
November 2, 2017
Please join us for the November 2 Lunch and Learn* with Dr. Aoki who’ll explore communication competencies, skills, and diversity consciousness for teaching and the classroom. RSVP before Nov. 1 at https://goo.gl/forms/NvoFHyBeAhSAJIfQ2
October 31, 2017
This session aims to discuss the data on the use and misuse of student course surveys. An update of the status, progress, and aims of the CSU course survey redesigtn will also be discussed. Goals and Objectives: 1. Discuss what student course feedback can (and cannot) tell us about the teaching-learning environment. 2. Share an update on the CSU course survey redesign efforts, including the challenges of use and misuse of the data.
October 31, 2017
Jennifer Schneider from Institutional Research and Shannon Archibeque-Engle from CAS will present an analysis of CSU's First Year Survey and its ability to predict student success. There are some really fascinating patterns in the data that should help us to improve student success within the College and University. Please RSVP with Andrew Norton at Andrew.norton@colostate.edu
October 30, 2017
During this workshop, participants will gain an understanding of how to approach a lesson plan that is both student-centered and results-driven. They will learn about essential components of a strong lesson plan and the purpose of the interactions of those components.

Dr. Wendy Fothergill is an assistant professor in the School of Education's Center for Educator Preparation at Colorado State University. Prior to her position at CSU, Dr. Fothergill served for 16 years as a teacher and educational leader in Fort Collins, Greeley and Loveland PK-12 schools. Her scholarly interests focus on building communities of practice in PK-12 schools. She is currently engaged in research on structures of practice to support school leaders. Dr. Fothergill coordinates, instructs and advises in the Principal Licensure and Master’s Plus Teaching Secondary Programs.

Dr. Derek Decker is an assistant professor in the Center for Educator Preparation in the School of Education at Colorado State University. He is a coordinator in the master's plus teaching licensure program, instructs within the master’s program, and supervises teacher candidates. Coming directly from the public school classroom as a teacher, Dr. Decker understands the importance of high quality teachers, teaching, and leadership. His scholarly interests center on the benefits of clinical practice where strong partnerships between PK-12 schools and teacher preparation programs flourish.
October 25, 2017
Engage students in learning by using dynamic activities that engage their imagination. This interactive presentation will use two examples to explore how drawing, experiential activities, and identity exploration can be used to teach complex topics. By making lessons relevant to the lives of students, they walk away with a deeper understanding of their discipline as well as greater awareness of themselves as thinkers and actors in an interconnected world. Discussion will allow participants from all disciplines to share their own techniques for engaging students in activities-based learning.
October 24, 2017
This session aims to share a framework for constructive mentoring of effective teaching and thoughts/tools on how best to provide and utilize constructive feedback. Goals and Objectives: 1. Discuss how "Teaching Effectiveness" has been framed. 2. Share models of how to combine evaluation and mentoring with an aim of excellence in the teaching-learning environment.
October 24, 2017
Interactions between undergraduate learning assistants (ULAs) and students have the potential to be a high-impact practice, not only for the ULA, but also for the course students. In this seminar, I hope to show you how I have changed the role of my ULAs from a one that focused on helping me with the administrative tasks in my large enrollment STEM course, to a role that is focused instead on increasing student engagement with the course material, as well as enriching the learning experience for my ULAs.
All CSU faculty, special faculty, and graduate students are invited to attend.
This seminar counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
October 11, 2017
Move over, millennials – here comes Generation Z! Borrowing bits from generational studies and student development theories, this session is designed to help put graduate teaching assistants into the shoes of our incoming first-year students. We will:
• Learn about the traits and shared experiences that many of Class of 2021 have in common
• Be introduced to the 7 Vectors of Student Development, one of the foundational theories about student growth during the college years
• Share knowledge on ways to relate with our students
• Ignite the spark of curiosity to go forward and learn with, as well as from, our students

About the presenter: Kat Hodgson is a third-year PhD student in Political Science. Before returning to graduate student life, Kat worked in Student Affairs at four different universities. This session is a compilation of the knowledge she gained in these positions. It’s also her way of giving back to the academic community that has enriched her life so greatly.

This is the second installment in TILT Peer2Peer Workshop Series which allows graduate students to share their knowledge, interest, and research as related to teaching and pedagogy. This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate. Lunch will be provided.
October 10, 2017
Starting this fall, a group of "dialoguers" from across campus will meet to collectively explore how they understand specific issues related to gender and apply their perspective to their personal and professional lives. The dialogues featured in Collaborative Conversations do more than just highlight the “what” of diversity and inclusion - they also model the “how” of engaging in unscripted, open-ended dialogue to learn from and with one another across our differences. Each Collaborative Conversation features an hour of dialogue with opportunities for audience participation. The space will be held for a second hour so that attendees who wish to stay may informally discuss and process topics raised in the conversation. * These events will be recorded and links will be made available for viewing by public audiences.
October 10, 2017
We all want every student to succeed, and we want them to understand that they are welcomed and supported. What strategies can we employ to achieve these goals? And, as importantly, what might we be doing that hampers our progress? There’s no single answer to these questions, and all of us have experiences that will shed light on this issue. In this session, we’ll spend most of our time in small moderated groups, sharing ideas and insights with our colleagues. You’ll get to meet and interact with folks from other departments, you’ll come away with an increased understanding of the issues at play, and you’ll pick up—and you’ll share with others—some practical suggestions of how to make your classroom more equitable and more inclusive. Please join the conversation! Please RSVP to cns_info@colostate.edu by Friday, October 6, 2017.
October 9, 2017
Feminists have been debating the commercial sex industry since the 1980s, with some arguing that pornography and prostitution inherently degrade women and others advocating for feminist erotica and legalized sex work. Increased attention to the problem of human trafficking recently has revived this debate among feminists, and both research and survivor stories shape feminist perspectives on commercial sex exploitation. This discussion will feature Dr. Karrin Anderson, Professor of Communication Studies and instructor of the CSU course “SPCM 320: Communication and Human Trafficking,” and Megan Lundstrom, Director of Free Our Girls, a northern Colorado anti-trafficking organization that works with survivors of human trafficking and educates our community on trafficking prevention. The discussion will focus on the nature of commercial sex exploitation, using current research and the real-world experiences of survivors to inform a discussion about feminist responses to sex work and sex trafficking.
October 6, 2017
The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health. The faculty version models an effective interaction between a faculty member and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important. A combination of learning modalities is used, including a realistic filmed scenario, participant discussion and a review of response options and campus resources. Lunch will be provided by TILT.
October 4, 2017
This Workshop from Apple’s Development Executive, Dr. Jon Landis, will focus on the impact mobile technology has had on Higher Education and on the Business world. This impact includes a paradigm shift in how information is disseminated and displayed. Dr. Jon Landis is the U.S. Development Executive with Apple Inc. He is a former professor in the College of Education from Millersville University where he was the graduate coordinator of the Leadership Program and the Coordinator of the CyberSafe Institute. Jon holds his Ph.D. in Sociology, a Masters degree in Education Leadership, and a B.S. in Chemistry. He has served as a chemistry instructor, principal, curriculum director, and IT Director. Dr. Landis speaks nationally on the opportunities associated with mobile technology in education. The presentation will be coordinated through Aaron Grider - Apple Senior Account Executive for Higher Education in the state of Colorado. Aaron is CSU’s primary Apple contact. Master Teacher Workshops are a great opportunity to grab some lunch, socialize with your colleagues from all the departments, and learn something in the process. Please RSVP so that we may obtain an accurate headcount for lunch. As always, Master Teacher Workshops are open to all faculty and staff.
October 4, 2017
Many students underestimate their real world value -- perhaps in part because they do not perceive how concepts learned in academic classes equate to changing workplace needs. Please join us in a simple active learning exercise that assists in reframing how students articulate what they learn in your classroom.
October 3, 2017
The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health. The faculty version models an effective interaction between a faculty member and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important. A combination of learning modalities is used, including a realistic filmed scenario, participant discussion and a review of response options and campus resources. Lunch will be provided by TILT.
September 22, 2017
Global learning and diversity initiatives have diverse origin stories that historically have defined their places on many college campuses. Over time, their paths have become interconnected and in today’s increasingly connected world, it is critical that institutions think strategically, intentionally, and meaningfully about how these initiatives can inform and advance student success without losing their unique elements. This presentation will address how global learning and inclusive excellence can do more than co-exist; they can truly enhance the educational experiences of students when institutional connections are made. Please register for this event:
September 21, 2017
In this interactive workshop, participants will explore opportunities to integrate global dimensions into their courses and prepare students for life and work in today’s society. Participants will draw on their own experiences and CSU opportunities for students as they consider revisions to their courses or the creation of new courses with an integrative global perspective. Workshop participants will also engage with global learning goals and outcomes as they connect their courses to broader campus initiatives. Lunch will be served. Please register HERE.
September 14, 2017
Starting this fall, a group of "dialoguers" from across campus will meet to collectively explore how they understand specific issues related to gender and apply their perspective to their personal and professional lives. The dialogues featured in Collaborative Conversations do more than just highlight the “what” of diversity and inclusion - they also model the “how” of engaging in unscripted, open-ended dialogue to learn from and with one another across our differences. Each Collaborative Conversation features an hour of dialogue with opportunities for audience participation. The space will be held for a second hour so that attendees who wish to stay may informally discuss and process topics raised in the conversation. *These events will be recorded and links will be made available for viewing by public audiences. * These events will be recorded and links will be made available for viewing by public audiences.
September 13, 2017
Unconscious or implicit bias impacts us all. Through this interactive session, we examine how to identify our own unconscious bias; recognize ways bias impacts those we supervise, teach, and work with; and discuss strategies to stop bias and stereotypes when they are used. PLEASE ONLY REGISTER IF YOU ARE A GRADUATE STUDENT OR POST DOC.
August 28, 2017
Dr. Eric Aoki will discuss the different types of conflict and intercultural conflict styles. He will also share examples and insights garnered from working through conflict in the classroom. Please RSVP to Naomi Lederer at Naomi.Lederer@colostate.edu
August 14, 2017
In the ongoing effort to enhance the effectiveness of undergraduate teaching and learning at Colorado State University, the goal of this annual required GTA Training is to equip every incoming GTA with basic institutional knowledge about CSU, review current learning and teaching Best Practices, and introduce a wide variety of resources that will help further their career as a CSU graduate teaching assistant. Please register for this event by August 1st at https://tilt.colostate.edu/proDev/gradStudents/gtaTraining/index.cfm
June 23, 2017
Please join us in welcoming Dale Johnson back to campus for the completion of the TILT Summer Conference Workshop on Adaptive Learning. This interactive presentation will explore challenges and opportunities to consider when evaluating and implementing adaptive learning systems. He will outline the issues and share practical examples from our implementation experience with flipped classes at Arizona State University. Dale will also share implementation models, implementation costs, and other resource implications. Participants will evaluate possible opportunities to use adaptive learning systems in their own institutions along with modes. During the session, participants will learn to: - Define adaptive systems and terminology - Identify challenges and opportunities with adaptive learning systems
May 17, 2017 - May 18, 2017
The TILT Summer conference overarching theme will be encompassing how High Impact Practices intersect with the Science of Learning Approach. Several sub-themes have already emerged including: Learning Assistants in the Classroom, Inclusion and Diversity, Internationalizing the Curriculum, Experiential Learning, and Adaptive Learning Systems. Please join us for the Keynote Speakers on Thursday, May 18th. In the morning, we'll have Dr. Candace Thille the founding director of the Open Learning Initiative (OLI) at Stanford University. In the afternoon, Dale Johnson, Adaptive Program Manager at Arizona State University.
April 21, 2017
The Latin word “persona” most directly translates to “mask.” What kind of mask should we wear while teaching? Should we wear a mask while teaching? How much of our teaching persona should be our authentic personality and how much of it should be a mask? How do we develop a teaching style that works for us as instructors and is also conducive to student learning? These questions are particularly salient for Graduate Teaching Assistants who may not be much older than their students and/or may not perceive themselves as having much more experience than their students. Together, we will explore what it means to put on a mask and to embrace a persona that strikes the right balance between your authentic self and the masked authority figure needed to effectively manage a classroom. Lunch will be provided. This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate. PLEASE ONLY REGISTER IF YOU ARE A GRADUATE STUDENT.
April 18, 2017
On Tuesday April 18 at noon in E005 Plant Sciences we will have our second MTI lunch for the semester: "Developing and Implementing a First-Year Graduate Student Experience Course at CSU” presented by Dr. Courtney Jahn, BSPM Please send Andrew an email by noon Monday April 17 to reserve lunch
April 18, 2017
Research on the science of learning explores methods and techniques that can be used in the classroom to improve student learning. Three researchers will talk about modern topics of adding games and play to the classroom. They will present current ideas based on research findings and practical applications of what instructors can do to make the classroom more fun while facilitating learning.   RSVP Info:  Email invitations will be sent, or contact Dr Garrity (below).   Contact Info: Dr. Deborah Garrity, 491-2513, Deborah.garrity@colostate.edu
April 17, 2017
Have you ever had to address an audience you didn’t know and might never interact with again? In this interactive Master Teacher Initiative Event, the history department’s Jared Orsi will share his observations about how to connect with such a group and foster conversation among them. And he’ll ask you to share yours, too!
April 14, 2017
I am excited to announce that we are gearing up to begin a new series of workshops and seminars that will count toward the TILT Graduate Teaching Certificate. We are in the beginning stages of planning a series of Peer-to-Peer workshops where graduate students like yourselves, including yourselves, will get to share what you have learned and researched about teaching and share it with other graduate students in a workshop/seminar context. That’s right, we want to learn from you all about how to be better teachers! We know you care about teaching and we know you know how to research best pedagogical practices and we want to give you an opportunity to share that knowledge and care with your peers. Not only will this be a fantastic chance to share knowledge and network with your peers but it is also great experience to put on a resume or CV! At this point, we would like to gather those of you who are interested in such an opportunity for an informational session where we can share with you our vision for the Peer-to-Peer Workshop Series and get an idea of the kinds of topics you all would like to present on. Please register here if you are interested in attending this informational session.
April 12, 2017
Join us for part or all of a program to brief faculty and staff on key upcoming RFPs, including the new HHMI Investigator call for proposals and the W.M. Keck Foundation; strategies for success with these sponsors; and, the opportunity to pitch your proposal ideas in moderated group discussions with peers and experts on these and other sponsors of your choosing, including those outside of the sciences. Time: 3:00PM - 3:30PM HHMI Investigator RFP (6/27/17 external deadline). 3:30PM - 4:00PM W.M. Keck Foundation research grants (5/15/17 internal preproposal deadline). 4:00PM - 5:00PM Moderated group brainstorming discussions organized around individuals proposal ideas and specific opportunities and disciplines.
April 12, 2017
Many of us struggle with creating inclusive conversation: What do I say? How do I say it? This session explores the concept of Intent vs Impact and how we can unintentionally create a hostile environment for our colleagues, students, and employees. We explore common phrases which marginalize campus members and discuss best practices to creating inclusive conversations. This workshop is sponsored by Graduate Women in Science, TILT, Graduate School, and the Warner College of Natural Resources. Lunch will be provided.
April 7, 2017
Join us for special TILT session with the internal CSU research team: Louise Jennings, PhD., Roe Bubar, J.D., Jen Krafchick, PhD., Caridad Souza, PhD., & Lisa Langstratt, PhD., where they share the findings from the study on Campus Climate and Women Faculty at CSU. Here they also discuss recommendations and Next steps. The Standing Committee on the Status of Women Faculty (SCSWF), a subcommittee of the President’s Commission on Women and Gender Equity (PCWGE), conducted a comprehensive research study led by an external researcher and a CSU research team over the last year to capture women faculty’s experiences and perceptions of the culture and climate at CSU. The project, entitled “Female Faculty’s Experiences and Perceptions of CSU Culture and Climate” offers an in-depth and nuanced understanding of women faculty’s experiences and perceptions within the context of CSU’s history, policies, and procedures. We have long recognized that improving campus climate and culture for women faculty will improve the campus culture for everyone at CSU. We encourage you to attend to learn more about where we are as a community and what we could do to become a better place for women to work and learn. TILT will provide lunch. REGISTER NOW as Space is limited.
March 29, 2017
As technology and trade continue to shrink our world and bring us all closer together, our responsibilities to bring that world into our courses increases. This workshop will provide several models and resources for designing innovative courses and programs that fully integrate international aspects into the learning objectives, pedagogies, and content.
March 23, 2017
Faith communities and/or how we participate in them can give us purpose, meaning, and connection, but can sometimes divide us from people in different faith communities. Join us for an evening of dialogue about faith and ethics. We’ll hear the views of committed practitioners of different faiths. We’ll also discuss the key ethical commitments of our own and others’ faith communities, the ethical tensions that can arise in interactions with people from different faith communities, and a case study that raises fundamental questions about the ethical issues involved in maintaining our own faith commitments while interacting with people who hold different commitments. Those who attend will have opportunities to both hear different perspectives and share their own with their small group. Seating is limited to 150. This is event is being co-sponsored by a number of campus and community groups such as: The Provost Ethics Colloquiums, CSU's Multi-Faith & Belief Student Council, the Fort Collins Interfaith Council, CSU's Center for Public Deliberation, and several others.
March 23, 2017
The Idea2Product Lab is now able to convert Medical CT scan data to 3D printed objects and we would like to share this process with you! This profession development workshop will walk you through the process of taking a medical CT scan and turning it into a file that can then be 3D printed. Great for printing models of bones, organs, and other parts of the body for professional and educational uses.
March 23, 2017
Please join Dr. Dean Hendrickson explore uses of screen sharing software to increase student engagement. Note: The first 40 attendees will be provided a license for software that can be loaded onto their laptop.
March 22, 2017
Recent research related to how the brain creates memories suggests that the use of frequent low-stakes assessments will improve student outcomes in higher education. This seminar will review the research on memory and the “testing effect,” provide examples and strategies to integrate frequent low-stakes assessments, and will include a discussion on the challenges and roadblocks associated with updating your course.
March 6, 2017
CSU’s Government Information Librarian will show examples of material available to the public from governmental agencies. Pretty much every subject area has some kind of government resource available. Learn about a variety (focusing on CSU STEM topics, but social sciences will be in there, as well as tiny fraction of humanities) of online materials. The State of Colorado has its own items of interest. Datasets, air, climate, soil, water, food, American history, sites in Spanish (& other languages), etc.!
February 28, 2017
Our student population becomes more varied each year with more first generation, non-traditional, racially, and ethnically diverse students. Come join this session to discuss student engagement and look at some strategies for reaching this wonderfully changing student population in both your face to face and online courses.
February 23, 2017
Students are accessing course materials using a wide variety of operating systems, mobile devices, and software. Student diversity is also greater than ever, including international students, English Language Learners, non-traditional students such as veterans, and students with disabilities. Learn how to create materials that are flexible and accessible for use with a variety of technologies. This session will focus on quick tips for formatting Canvas courses, Word Documents, PowerPoints, PDFs and Multimedia for the highest impact.
February 21, 2017
What is an ally? Can one call themselves an ally or do you need to prove you are an ally? This session will explore keys to ally development, discuss skills to recognize when an intervention is necessary, provide tools to intervene, and an opportunity for application through case studies. This workshop is sponsored by Graduate Women in Science, TILT, Graduate School, and the Warner College of Natural Resources. Lunch will be provided.
February 10, 2017
The Latin word “persona” most directly translates to “mask.” What kind of mask should we wear while teaching? Should we wear a mask while teaching? How much of our teaching persona should be our authentic personality and how much of it should be a mask? How do we develop a teaching style that works for us as instructors and is also conducive to student learning? These questions are particularly salient for Graduate Teaching Assistants who may not be much older than their students and/or may not perceive themselves as having much more experience than their students. Together, we will explore what it means to put on a mask and to embrace a persona that strikes the right balance between your authentic self and the masked authority figure needed to effectively manage a classroom. Lunch will be provided. This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate. PLEASE ONLY REGISTER IF YOU ARE A GRADUATE STUDENT.
February 9, 2017
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty position. This Workshop Will: Overview research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy Highlight the central information that should be included Share strategies that ensure an engaging, succinct, and audience-appropriate document This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
January 24, 2017
Please join us for tips, model building, and technology related to engaging your audience. Bring your team building and creativity skills!
January 9, 2017
Join us for the Early Career Investigators Grant Seminar hosted by the Office of the Vice President for Research and University Advancement to learn new strategies and opportunities for pursuing Early Career Awards from public and private grant makers.
December 8, 2016
Tips for differing exam formats and making the most of your study time.
December 7, 2016
The Latin word “persona” most directly translates to “mask.” What kind of mask should we wear while teaching? Should we wear a mask while teaching? How much of our teaching persona should be our authentic personality and how much of it should be a mask? How do we develop a teaching style that works for us as instructors and is also conducive to student learning? These questions are particularly salient for Graduate Teaching Assistants who may not be much older than their students and/or may not perceive themselves as having much more experience than their students. Together, we will explore what it means to put on a mask and to embrace a persona that strikes the right balance between your authentic self and the masked authority figure needed to effectively manage a classroom. Lunch will be provided. This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate. PLEASE ONLY REGISTER IF YOU ARE A GRADUATE STUDENT. THIS WILL BE THE SAME EXACT WORKSHOP AS THE ONE ON 11/17 SO PLEASE ALLOW OTHERS TO REGISTER FOR THIS WORKSHOP IF YOU WERE ABLE TO ATTEND THE FIRST ONE.
December 6, 2016
Tips for differing exam formats and making the most of your study time.
December 5, 2016
Tips for differing exam formats and making the most of your study time.
December 1, 2016
Learn the causes of stress, its positive and negative effects, and different coping strategies.
November 29, 2016
Learn the causes of stress, its positive and negative effects, and different coping strategies.
November 28, 2016
Learn the causes of stress, its positive and negative effects, and different coping strategies.
November 17, 2016
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated.
November 17, 2016
Lucia Delgado will present "Supporting First Generation and Historically Underrepresented Students" at the Access Center. Please RSVP to Andrew.Norton@Colostate.edu by 5:00 pm Friday to reserve lunch.
November 17, 2016
The Latin word “persona” most directly translates to “mask.” What kind of mask should we wear while teaching? Should we wear a mask while teaching? How much of our teaching persona should be our authentic personality and how much of it should be a mask? How do we develop a teaching style that works for us as instructors and is also conducive to student learning? These questions are particularly salient for Graduate Teaching Assistants who may not be much older than their students and/or may not perceive themselves as having much more experience than their students. Together, we will explore what it means to put on a mask and to embrace a persona that strikes the right balance between your authentic self and the masked authority figure needed to effectively manage a classroom. Lunch will be provided. This workshop counts toward the Graduate Teaching Certificate. PLEASE ONLY REGISTER IF YOU ARE A GRADUATE STUDENT
November 15, 2016
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated.
November 14, 2016
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated.
November 10, 2016
Understand why you procrastinate, and learn strategies for changing those habits.
November 9, 2016
Should learning be fun? What is the balance between enticing students to be engaged using fun lead-ins, versus challenging them to develop the grit required to become a self-directed learner? Please RSVP to: cns@colostate.edu by Friday, November 4, 2016. Contact Debbie Garrity, 491-2513, deborah.garrity@colostate.edu with questions.
November 8, 2016
Understand why you procrastinate, and learn strategies for changing those habits.
November 8, 2016
This workshop provides an introduction to basic Canvas quiz analytics and enhanced integrated quiz technology. We will present ways to locate and use basic quiz-based analytics such as number of attempts, time spent on quiz, time spent on each item, and quiz focus. We will also take a look at advanced and transmedia quizzing options made possible using PlayPosit. This cloud service can help build advanced assessment types that directly integrate with the Canvas assessment module. We discuss how this information is useful for understanding how your students are engaged in your course. Additional information: Please bring your own laptop or other device. This session will be available for live online webcast participation, and recorded for later viewing.
November 7, 2016
Understand why you procrastinate, and learn strategies for changing those habits.
November 7, 2016
Please join us for lunch at 11:00 - Presentation will start at 11:30 - Register today as space is limited! This discussion looks at how gender inequality gets embedded in our institutional policies and practices in ways that inadvertently keep hierarchies of male privilege in place. It present two tools—a Power, Privilege, Difference framework and a metric called Difference/Value Dichotomy—we find helpful in examining the kind of institutional social dynamics that adversely affect women, first generation, disabled, LGBTQ and gender variant individuals, and people of color. Our goal is to initiate a dialogue about the strategies that best help uncover and address potential biases regarding social and cultural difference that marginalize non-normative groups and individuals, and prevent them from fully contributing to the core mission of an institution. The target audience is anyone interested in learning about the way institutions can become more inclusive of difference. This program is co-sponsored by the Vice President's Office for Diversity and TILT. Lunch will be provided by TILT.
November 3, 2016
Techniques to deliver and effective, eloquent, audience-centered presentation.
November 1, 2016
Techniques to deliver and effective, eloquent, audience-centered presentation.
October 31, 2016
Techniques to deliver and effective, eloquent, audience-centered presentation.
October 31, 2016
This session will discuss instructional strategies and activities centered on student collaboration and engagement. Topics presented included active learning, group dynamics and collaborative learning, classroom assessment techniques, and strategies that create self-regulated learners. Goals: 1) Provide techniques that promote student-centered learning 2) Provide insight into active learning and collaboration. 3) Created interest in innovative teaching strategies that fosters further exploration.
October 27, 2016
Learn information-recall strategies and how to enhance your ability to focus.
October 25, 2016
Learn information-recall strategies and how to enhance your ability to focus.
October 25, 2016

The heart of the workshop is an in-depth review of the intents and requirements of each Concept category and Feature including an understanding of the medical basis for each Feature and design and construction strategies for implementing the concepts and requirements.

The WELL Building Standard marries best practices in design and construction with evidence-based health and wellness interventions.

In this workshop, attendees learn how to harness the built environment as a vehicle to support human health, well-being, and comfort. Strategies for improving the nutrition, fitness, mood, sleep patterns and performance of occupants through design and construction practices are explored in detail.

NOTE: When you register you will be asked to login using your eID. If you do not have one, please fill in the alternate eID form fields found on the login page.

PARKING: The nearest parking lots are 412 (West of Hartshorn Health Center) and 425 (West of Morgan Library). Visitor parking is outlined in red on the map.

For a visual, see Map of Parking Lots 412 and 425

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the purpose, key components, and structure of the WELL Building Standard
  • Discuss the medical basis for the Concepts and Features of the WELL Building Standard
  • Understand successful strategies for meeting the requirements of the WELL Features
  • Learn WELL resources and how to become a WELL Accredited Professional

CEU Credit available

  • GBCI Course Code: 920002572
  • AIA Course Code: WELLAP6-15
  • IDCEC number will be forthcoming.
October 24, 2016
Learn information-recall strategies and how to enhance your ability to focus.
October 24, 2016
This session will discuss instructional strategies and activities centered on student collaboration and engagement. Topics presented included active learning, group dynamics and collaborative learning, classroom assessment techniques, and strategies that create self-regulated learners. Goals: 1) Provide techniques that promote student-centered learning 2) Provide insight into active learning and collaboration. 3) Created interest in innovative teaching strategies that fosters further exploration.
October 21, 2016
The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health. The faculty version models an effective interaction between a faculty member and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important. A combination of learning modalities is used, including a realistic filmed scenario, participant discussion and a review of response options and campus resources. Lunch will be provided by TILT.
October 20, 2016
Strategies to calm yourself before exams to boost your confidence.
October 18, 2016
Our student population becomes more varied each year with more first generation, non-traditional, racially, and ethnically diverse students. Come join this session to discuss student engagement and look at some strategies for reaching this wonderfully changing student population in both your face to face and online courses.
October 17, 2016
Strategies to calm yourself before exams to boost your confidence.
October 17, 2016 - November 6, 2016
Engagement can be one of the most important indicators for a successful online class experience, and it can be accomplished by building a learning community. In this short course, you will explore practices and discover tools that encourage three types of engagement: student to instructor, student to student and student to content. Additionally, you will discover techniques and procedures for successfully managing and facilitating an online course through building your learning community. You might be interested in this course if: • You have some experience as an online developer/student/instructor. • You have some experience with a learning management system. • You’re interested in learning how to improve your online facilitation skills. This class is part of a series of TILT short courses on best practices for designing, developing and facilitating online courses. The courses can be taken in any order. However, if you don’t have much experience designing and developing an online course, hands-on experience in a learning management system or previous online teaching experience, you may want to take Course 1 before taking Course 3 or Course 4.
October 13, 2016
Use what research says are the best ways to learn and enhance your study habits.
October 12, 2016
Join CSU Online in one of the Distance Smart Classroom and learn all about the use of the amazing technologies available to engage your students and help focus their attention on your content. Use of Smart Meeting Pro software, the Crestron control system, Sympodiums and or SmartBoards, audio, and Echo 360 recording will be covered. Plan to bring a USB stick with a sample presentation so you can interact with the various technologies. If you plan to teach with a laptop, bring it along with your video adaptor and test everything out before using it in class! Goals • Share Research for Engaging Students and keeping their attention focused. • Introduce faculty to some of the capabilities of installed systems in some of our Distance Smart Classrooms. • Show faculty how the software enhances engagement of students both F2F and Online. • Discuss Smart Meeting Pro software to run SmartBoards and or Sympodiums. Also look at Document Cameras, Echo 360 Safe Capture for Recording, Mic systems and their use. • Give faculty hands on experience using the systems and applying the concepts to their teaching style. • Answer questions faculty may have about the systems installed in various Distance Smart Classrooms. Target Audience Any faculty or staff interested in learning more about using these technologies to enhance student engagement. Specifically, those teaching in the following technology equipped distance rooms: Anazo W205, BSB 107, BSB 103, BSB 131, BSB A101, Clark A206, Clark A101, 102, 103, 104, 201, 202; Chem A101, CS 130, CS 325, Engr B2, B4, C205 and 100, Gifford 144, Scott 229, Shep 218, Stat 6, UCA 142, Vet Teaching Hospital A221, Weber 202, 237, Yates 104. Each of these classrooms is equipped with, Sympodiums, and/or SmartBoards, an Echo 360 Safe Capture Device, Cameras, and mic capabilities (either installed or checked out from Morgan Library). Length of the training: Two Hours (to allow hands on and practice time).
October 11, 2016
Use what research says are the best ways to learn and enhance your study habits.
October 11, 2016
This workshop provides an introduction to video add-on technologies that can be used within Canvas to provide instructors with insights into students’ video watching behavior. We will show you ways to locate and use basic analytics found directly inside Canvas such as videos viewed, confusion points, time specific notes, attendance, engagement, note activity and questions asked. We discuss how this information is useful for understanding how your students are engaged in your course. Additional information: Please bring your own laptop or other device. This session will be available for live online webcast participation, and recorded for later viewing.
October 10, 2016
Use what research says are the best ways to learn and enhance your study habits.
October 10, 2016
PowerPoint is a tool that instructors can’t live without, whether teaching face-to-face or online. This session will offer rules and best practices for preparing your content and taking your presentation skills to the next level. This is a hands-on class using PowerPoint 2016.
October 6, 2016
How to dissect and think through information on a deeper level.
October 6, 2016
This session will introduce the wide range of video based assignments available through the YouSeeU integration in Canvas. YouSeeU is used across the world to conduct assignments such as online presentations, group projects, case study method, in-class recording of performances, and oral quizzes. We will provide an in-depth review of best practices and the benefits realized by deploying YouSeeU in classes from all disciplines. This is a hands-on class using YouSeeU and Canvas.
October 6, 2016
What makes for a good presentation? Actually, quality presentations are simple (you need about three good gestures and one or two good ideas) and difficult (which three gestures and which two ideas?). Together we’ll explore building simpler and better presentations. Please RSVP to Naomi Lederer at Naomi.Lederer@colostate.edu
October 4, 2016
How to dissect and think through information on a deeper level.
October 4, 2016
Recording lectures and making them available for student review is becoming very popular as part of the blended learning experience for students. Echo360 is a lecture capture standard and is now available to faculty in two ways; through hardware appliances that have been installed in a small handful of classrooms on campus or through ‘personal capture’ software that can be installed on your desktop or laptop. This session will discuss both options. This is a hands-on class using Echo 360. We will practice making recordings and publishing them to the Echo 360 server.
October 4, 2016
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty position. This Workshop Will: Overview research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy Highlight the central information that should be included Share strategies that ensure an engaging, succinct, and audience-appropriate document This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certificate.
October 3, 2016
How to dissect and think through information on a deeper level.
October 3, 2016
Student evaluations of teaching (SET) are widely used in academic personnel decisions as a measure of teaching effectiveness. Prof. Stark will discuss compelling evidence showing that student ratings vary with instructors’ gender, ethnicity, and attractiveness; with course rigor, mathematical content, and format; and with students’ grade expectations. He will demonstrate that SET are more sensitive to students' gender bias and grade expectations than they are to teaching effectiveness, with gender biases arge enough to cause more effective instructors to get lower SET than less effective instructors.
October 3, 2016 - October 23, 2016
This short course lays out a philosophical landscape in an online learning environment. It introduces simple and practical pedagogical tips for online course design and facilitation with brief sketches of the key constructivist learning theories. Participants of this course will be encouraged to discuss course-design ideas inspired by a theorist and to apply best practices for teaching online using their Canvas sandbox. You might be interested in this course if: • You have some experience as an online developer/student/instructor. • You have some experience with a learning management system. • You’re interested in learning theoretical foundations for online courses. This class is part of a series of TILT short courses on best practices for designing, developing and facilitating online courses. The courses can be taken in any order. However, if you don’t have much experience designing and developing an online course, hands-on experience in a learning management system or previous online teaching experience, you may want to take Course 1 before taking Course 3 or Course 4.
September 29, 2016
How to approach your reading your course material for optimal comprehension and retention.
September 28, 2016
CSU will be using i>clicker 7.6.2 with Canvas this Fall semester. i>clicker 7.6.2 integrate provides a seamless integration of data between Canvas and i>clicker/i>grader. Using the i>clicker integration: •All students will need to register their i>clicker remotes directly through Canvas one time •Instructors can easily sync the class roster and student registration •Instructors can easily upload i>clicker session data into the Canvas Grade book Attend this session and learn how to set up your course in Canvas using i>clicker.
September 28, 2016
Rubrics are beneficial to students and instructors as they communicate expectations to students at the start of an assignment. Rubrics also provide a guideline for instructors to evaluate student performance as well as provide informative feedback. In this session, we will discuss the steps and considerations involved when creating a new rubric. Please bring an assignment for inspiration.
September 27, 2016
How to approach your reading your course material for optimal comprehension and retention.
September 26, 2016
How to approach your reading your course material for optimal comprehension and retention.
September 26, 2016
The anti-plagiarism tool that instructors can use in Canvas is called VeriCite. We will discuss the settings you can use for VeriCite and what sources are checked for plagiarism. We will demonstrate how to add VeriCite to a Canvas assignment, how a student would submit a paper, and how to view the anti-plagiarism report. We will also show how to annotate and grade these papers and how to manually submit a paper on a student’s behalf. This is a hands-on training using Canvas and VeriCite.
September 26, 2016
This session will introduce the wide range of video based assignments available through the YouSeeU integration in Canvas. YouSeeU is used across the world to conduct assignments such as online presentations, group projects, case study method, in-class recording of performances, and oral quizzes. We will provide an in-depth review of best practices and the benefits realized by deploying YouSeeU in classes from all disciplines. This is a hands-on class using YouSeeU and Canvas.
September 22, 2016
Learn different styles of note-taking, and how to use your notes for maximum effectiveness.
September 22, 2016
Differences in collaborative and cooperative learning have often been confused and led to misunderstandings of their functions in promoting engaged student learning. Furthermore, popular teaching methods such as “the flipped-classroom” often fall short of their intended learning outcomes due to conceptual misconceptions and dissonances between collaborative and cooperative educational models. Applicable to a broad array of disciplines, this lunchtime discussion will examine two participant structures – IRE and HEI – to help teachers to bring new understandings to problem-based learning, inquisitive inquiry, and discipline-specific engagement.
September 21, 2016
This session will introduce the wide range of video based assignments available through the YouSeeU integration in Canvas. YouSeeU is used across the world to conduct assignments such as online presentations, group projects, case study method, in-class recording of performances, and oral quizzes. We will provide an in-depth review of best practices and the benefits realized by deploying YouSeeU in classes from all disciplines. This is a hands-on class using YouSeeU and Canvas.
September 20, 2016
Learn different styles of note-taking, and how to use your notes for maximum effectiveness.
September 19, 2016
Please join us for an evening with Jacqueline Patterson. In partnership with the Diversity Symposium this free community event is hosted by the President's Sustainability Committee with the help for these sponsors: ASCSU Environmental Affairs | Environmental Justice CSU Facilities Management | Global Social & Sustainable Enterprise | Housing & Dining Services School of Global Environmental Sustainability | Student Affairs | Student Sustainability Center | TILT
September 19, 2016
Learn different styles of note-taking, and how to use your notes for maximum effectiveness.
September 19, 2016 - October 9, 2016
In this class, you’ll learn about and practice three main steps for developing an online course. First, you’ll learn how and why to start your course design by writing learning objectives. Next, you’ll explore some of the ways to create authentic online assessments. Finally, you’ll see and try some of the options for presenting course materials online, such as lectures, readings and more. While we will not focus on teaching you how to use Canvas, you will work in Canvas to create items for your own course. You might be interested in this course if: • You have some experience as an online developer/student/instructor. • You have some experience with a learning management system. • You have an interest in learning some basic steps in designing and developing an online course. This class is part of a series of TILT short courses on best practices for designing, developing and facilitating online courses. The courses can be taken in any order. However, if you don’t have much experience designing and developing an online course, hands-on experience in a learning management system or previous online teaching experience, you may want to take Course 1 before taking Course 3 or Course 4.
September 15, 2016
How to take better care of your physical needs (sleep, nutrition, and activities) for overall success.
September 13, 2016
How to take better care of your physical needs (sleep, nutrition, and activities) for overall success.
September 13, 2016
This workshop provides an overview of both student and course analytics tools available in Canvas. We will cover ways to locate and use basic analytics such as activity, submissions, participations, and page views. In addition, we discuss how this information is useful for understanding how your students are engaged in your course. Additional information: Please bring your own laptop or other device. This session will be available for live online webcast participation, and recorded for later viewing.
September 12, 2016
How to take better care of your physical needs (sleep, nutrition, and activities for overall success.
September 12, 2016
Co-hosted by the Office of the Vice President for Research and University Advancement, this seminar is intended to help early career investigators to advance their research and careers through federal and private foundation grants. The seminar will cover strategies for navigating these very different funding sources. It will also include a briefing on upcoming proposal opportunities. The intended audience is faculty within five years of their appointments and staff who work with them in the pursuit of external funding, but the seminar is open to all.
September 10, 2016
Enlarging the Field of Possibility for Our World Mindfulness has the potential to prepare our students and ourselves for the increasingly complex, interconnected, global, social and environmental challenges of the 21st century. Research and our own personal experience suggest that contemplative education can significantly contribute to our students’ personal growth and lead to greater creativity, enlarging the field of possibility in our world. Educational strategies using contemplative practices tend to increase self-awareness and interpersonal skills, and promote an institutional culture of cooperation and collaboration leading to greater productivity and satisfaction within the institution as a whole. The Process This gathering is an opportunity for those in higher education to meet and explore common interests in this arena, and to promote community and collaboration in the Rocky Mountain Region. To this end, the day is structured as an extended, facilitated dialogue among all attendees. Through personal interaction, joint practice, and group process we will share ideas and experiences and explore possibilities. Building on our successful gathering last year, we will continue to build our network: learning from one another, exchanging stories and examples of how we are utilizing mindfulness in the classroom, sharing our successes and challenges.
September 8, 2016
How to approach prioritizing your commitments using different scheduling strategies.
September 6, 2016
How to approach prioritizing your commitments using different scheduling strategies.
September 1, 2016
How to best organize yourself and your course materials for the semester.
August 30, 2016
How to best organize yourself and your course materials for the semester.
August 29, 2016
How to best organize yourself and your course materials for the semester.
August 15, 2016
To equip all incoming GTAs with basic institutional knowledge about Colorado State University. This will include the wide variety of University resources any GTA will need and or find helpful in the fulfillment of his or her duties and responsibilities, likewise the personal and professional expectations to which the University will hold them. Incoming GTAs will also be introduced to universal learning and teaching issues, current pedagogical Best Practices, as well as strategies both for promoting academic integrity and assessing student performances/outcomes.
May 26, 2016 - July 11, 2016
The workshop series provides professional development in skills essential for anyone intending to mentor undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral students in research or other scholarly activities. These workshops also provide a venue for experienced mentors to share their experiences and for new and experienced mentors to discuss concerns, issues and solutions. An overarching goal is to improve the climate of inclusiveness at CSU and where ever participants end up as supervisors, trainers and mentors. Nine workshops will be offered between May 26 and July 11, 2016. There is no cost for attending and participants are not required to attend all the workshops. This Workshop Series will meet May 26, June 2, June 6, June 16, June 20, June 23, June 30, July 7, and July 11
May 18, 2016 - May 19, 2016
A number of high-impact educational practices have been shown by extensive research to benefit all students, including those from historically under-represented groups. While these practices can take many forms in courses and instructional approaches, they are defined by six characteristics, ranging from requiring high levels of intellectual and personal engagement to providing opportunities for knowledge transfer, application, and testing. The conference provides opportunities to explore a wide range of issues related to the use of high-impact practices (HIPs) to promote critical thinking and intellectual growth. The theme of the conference, "High-Impact Practices: Making a Difference in Teaching and Learning," calls attention to the six HIP characteristics that help our students to gain knowledge, skills, and experiences.
May 2, 2016
Presented by the Career Center. Learn what to consider in deciding whether graduate school is right for you.
April 25, 2016
Presented by the Career Center. Translating your academic skills and experiences to a resume and career.
April 21, 2016
Learn from peers about practical ways to apply your academics to the real world.
April 19, 2016
Learn from peers about practical ways to apply your academics to the real world.
April 18, 2016
Learn from peers about practical ways to apply your academics to the real world.
April 15, 2016

From Groups and Hangouts to Analytics and Docs, Google offers a wide range of products that might be incorporated to support learning and teaching. This workshop, which will focus on Google Forms, offers participants an opportunity to explore and envision a range of pedagogical uses of this survey tool.

In specific, we’ll discuss how Google Forms can be used as a quiz and testing mechanism to measure how students have mastered course readings and concepts, as well as a tool for capturing in-semester feedback from students about how course design is working. We’ll also discuss how the tool could be leveraged for larger projects such as assessment and programmatic research.

Those who bring a laptop will have the opportunity to practice designing a form, and we’ll collaboratively brainstorm how we might creatively use the tool for other aims, too!

For RSVP sign up, and lunch menu information, please contact Pamela coke at: Pamela.Coke@colostate.edu
April 15, 2016
Unconscious or implicit bias impacts us all. Through this interactive session, we examine how to identify our own unconscious bias; recognize ways bias impacts those we supervise, teach, and work with; and discuss strategies to stop bias and stereotypes when they are used. Lunch will be provided.
April 14, 2016
An overview of using Excel including formula and graph formations, as well as PowerPoint presentations and special effects.
April 14, 2016
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty position. This Workshop Will: Overview research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy Highlight the central information that should be included Share strategies that ensure an engaging, succinct, and audience-appropriate document This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for the Graduate Teaching Certifiate.
April 12, 2016
An overview of using Excel including formula and graph formations, as well as PowerPoint presentations and special effects.
April 11, 2016
An overview of using Excel including formula and graph formations, as well as PowerPoint presentations and special effects.
April 11, 2016
Nurturing student research skills: Reflections of a growing library partnership Neyda Gilman and Jimena Sagas, CSU Libraries. Neyda and Jimena are College Liaison Librarians, and will present on ways to include research skill development as a part of your course. Please RSVP to Andrew Norton by noon Friday April 8 to reserve lunch.
April 7, 2016
Learn strategies and attitudes for success and how to address conflict amongst group members.
April 5, 2016
Learn strategies and attitudes for success and how to address conflict amongst group members.
April 4, 2016
Learn strategies and attitudes for success and how to address conflict amongst group members.
April 1, 2016

“State Your Case: Teaching Students to Develop and Support Thesis Statements”Presented by Ariel Schnee, History

Please join us for a series of conversations about how to integrate writing into courses across the disciplines. We are pleased to feature the experiences of CSU graduate student teachers who have developed innovative and thoughtful ways to reflect upon teaching and motivate successful student writing.

For more information, contact Dr. Tobi Jacobi, gtPathways Writing Initiative Director: tjacobi@colostate.edu. *presented in coordination with the College of Liberal Arts MTI lunchtime series*
March 31, 2016
How to be an “academic advocate” for yourself and peers by learning collaborative study skills.
March 31, 2016
The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health. The faculty version models an effective interaction between an instructor and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important. A combination of learning modalities is used, including a realistic filmed scenario, participant discussion and a review of response options and campus resources.
March 31, 2016

This interactive workshop is about making sure we, as teachers, are actively involved in energy-giving and energy-taking activities. The purpose is to develop a plan for building a teaching career that you would choose. There will be lunch provided by TILT.

To RSVP and receive a lunch menu order form please contact Pamela Coke at: Pamela.Coke@colostate.edu
March 29, 2016
How to be an “academic advocate” for yourself and peers by learning collaborative study skills.
March 28, 2016
How to be an “academic advocate” for yourself and peers by learning collaborative study skills.
March 26, 2016
This free conference for CSU graduate students will focus on exploring "best fit" in terms of workplace culture. The morning will include a keynote speech followed by three breakout sessions with representatives from different sectors.
March 24, 2016
Presented by the CSU Health Network. Learn about research-supported pathways to a greater sense of well-being and resilience: pleasure, engagement, and meaning.
March 22, 2016

Over a quarter of a million veterans are currently enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities, and a quarter million more have applied for GI Bill education benefits. In total, nearly 2 million military personnel who served in Iraq and Afghanistan are eligible for the 2009 Post-9/11 GI Bill.

In many ways, CSU is well-situated to respond to the needs of this student population; we have earned a "veteran-friendly" designation and have initiated efforts to identify and reduce barriers to veterans' educational goals, to assist veterans as they transition from active duty to college life, and to provide timely and accurate information about veterans' benefits and services.

As we continue to strengthen programs we need to focus our efforts at the pedagogical level. According to a 2010 NASPA report, student-veterans often report a sense of isolation on campus and frustration with traditional students: they express concern about entering into a potentially liberal college culture that may conflate anti-war sentiment with anti-military sentiment, and they can face difficulty finding mentors amongst faculty whose values may differ significantly from their own. Not only are some student-veterans struggling with financial pressures and dealing with physical and mental health disabilities (including the "signature wounds" of TBI and PTSD), they also share the challenges many nontraditional students face, such as childcare, "relearning" study skills and understanding (often unspoken) academic expectations. Only a well-informed faculty can understand and address such challenges to ensure retention and degree-completion.

About the Course Leaders:

Lisa Langstraat:

Lisa Langstraat has been directly involved with teaching of student-veteran cohorts in first-year composition at CSU and has worked closely with some on writing and research projects. She grew up as a "military brat," the daughter of a senior Army non-commissioned officer who served in Vietnam.

Sue Doe

Sue Doe is a military spouse for the final 15 years of her partner's military career, taught at several colleges and universities around the country during Army duty assignments. Immediately prior to her appointment at CSU, she served on the civilian faculty at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. She has worked closely with student-veterans on the campus of CSU, including the teaching of 50-50 split sections of first-year composition which are evenly divided between student-veterans and civilian students. Her father served as a combat engineer in WWII.

Christina Sutton

Christina Sutton is a long-time instructor in the English Department who works to tap into what student-veterans offer to the courses they take. She likes working individually with student-veterans to help them figure how they can use their military experiences to write more effectively in their classes.

March 21, 2016
Presented by the CSU Health Network. Learn about research-supported pathways to a greater sense of well-being and resilience: pleasure, engagement, and meaning.
March 10, 2016
Presented by the Kendall Anderson Nutrition Center. Learn what foods can help promote the most optimal brain activity.
March 8, 2016
Presented by the Kendall Anderson Nutrition Center. Learn what foods can help promote the most optimal brain activity.
March 8, 2016

“Big History,” supported by Bill Gates, is a controversial teaching model that builds connections from the big bang to global warming. “Microhistory” addresses the big themes of world history through localized studies. Which best serves our students and society? Bring your lunch and ideas to this discussion about innovations in history teaching and methods.

Lecture starts at 12:15 and ends at 1:15pm (I know the other thing says different there is no 12:15-1:15 option!) and is a "brown bag" lunch, so bring your own lunch if you want to eat!

For registration questions please contact Karen Gardenier at: karen.gardenier@colostate.edu

March 8, 2016
Our students are people, with complex lives, emotions, and different interests than us. It’s important to respect this and acknowledge this. In this presentation, I’ll describe some small changes you can make in your classroom that will pay dividends in how your students feel about your class but, more importantly, in how they perform in your class
March 8, 2016

“The Power of Creativity: Teaching Students to Explore Voice and Identity in their Writing”. Presented by Octavius Jones, Ethnic Studies

Please join us for a series of conversations about how to integrate writing into courses across the disciplines. We are pleased to feature the experiences of CSU graduate student teachers who have developed innovative and thoughtful ways to reflect upon teaching and motivate successful student writing.

For more information, contact Dr. Tobi Jacobi, gtPathways Writing Initiative Director: tjacobi@colostate.edu.*presented in coordination with the College of Liberal Arts MTI lunchtime series*
March 3, 2016
Presented by the CSU Health Network. How mindfulness can help with stress and help you be more present in the moment.
March 2, 2016
Where can you get at least eight teaching tips in an hour and a free lunch? The answer of course is the Master Teacher Workshop to be held on March 2nd from 12-1 pm in Room 119! At least eight of your colleagues have volunteered to provide teaching tips that can be explained/ demonstrated in less than five minutes. This is a fun format that we have had success with in the past, and we hope you can join us. Please RSVP so that we may have an accurate count for lunch. Hope to see you next Wednesday! Doug
March 1, 2016
We hear more about mindfulness every day, in the media. Please join us for this presentation about mindfulness in the classroom, where we will discuss the research, tools, and techniques for exploring how mindfulness practices could help in that setting. Pre-registration is required: Please contact Merinda McLure merinda.mclure@colostate.edu
February 29, 2016
As Prof. Plaisance will show, using empirical approaches to questions of values and moral judgment, moral psychology has provided insights into our ethical orientations, how we approach ethical dilemmas, and differences in moral reasoning. Based on this field, a clear moral psychology profile emerges among media ‘exemplars’ – journalists and public relations practitioners respected for their ethical leadership – that offers lessons for ethical media practice.
February 29, 2016
Presented by the CSU Health Network. How mindfulness can help with stress and help you be more present in the moment.
February 29, 2016

Wish your students could collaboratively annotate texts and images? They can! Learn about Hypothes.is and StoryMap.JS, free digital tools that allow students to collaboratively annotate online texts, .pdfs, and images. These tools work well for class discussion preparation, encouraging critical thinking and engagement with texts, and larger class projects like annotated bibliographies, text/image analyses, and geospatial narratives. These tools are easy to learn and will change the way your students engage with a variety of texts.

February 25, 2016
Tips on how to recreate the face-to-face classroom experience when taking online courses.
February 25, 2016
This talk and discussion will examine the ethical challenges that accompany community-based research and teaching. Dr. Jeni Cross will begin with a discussion of the unique ethical concerns that accompany community-based research and teaching. Ethics in research often focuses on individual rights and prevention of harm, but community-based research highlights two additional ethical concerns. First, the field of CBR has identified unique ethical obligations to communities which extend ethical obligations beyond individuals and to groups as social agents and entities with rights. Second, CBR projects provide the opportunity for exploration of the ethics of diversity. How do students bring their diverse knowledge into projects for the benefit of community partners? How must students learn new skills to meet the ethical obligations of respect, justice, beneficence, and self-improvement when dealing with diversity in the community? Dr. Cross will illustrate the ethical issues of diversity in CBR projects with examples from her CBR course over the last decade. Following the talk, Dr. Cross will facilitate a discussion with the audience of the opportunities for teaching ethics of diversity and the ethical challenges faced in community-based research. TILT will provide lunch.
February 24, 2016

In this workshop we will explore some dimensions of what makes reflective practice critical, including theoretical perspectives and practical reflective techniques based on our own experiences. Please register to attend as capacity is limited. To register please contact Merinda McLure at: merinda.mclure@colostate.edu.

Presenters: Anne-Marie Deitering, Franklin A. McEdward Professor for Undergraduate Learning Initiatives, Oregon State University Libraries, and Wendy Holliday, Head of Teaching, Learning, and Research Services, Cline Library, University of Northern Arizona.

February 23, 2016
Tips on how to recreate the face-to-face classroom experience when taking online courses.
February 23, 2016

“What's a Syllabus? Helping Students Navigate College Writing Expectations” Presented by Jessica Campbell, Hailey Groo, and Sam Iven.

Please join us for a series of conversations about how to integrate writing into courses across the disciplines. We are pleased to feature the experiences of CSU graduate student teachers who have developed innovative and thoughtful ways to reflect upon teaching and motivate successful student writing.

For more information, contact Dr. Tobi Jacobi, gtPathways Writing Initiative Director: tjacobi@colostate.edu.*presented in coordination with the College of Liberal Arts MTI lunchtime series
February 23, 2016

As graduate students enter their final semesters at CSU, they increasingly focus on plans for their life after finishing the University. This workshop will focus on “best practices” for advising our upper division students on career-related matters, including: finding internships and employment, preparing applications for graduate school or the health professions, and career options other than professional school.

Please RSVP to: cns@colostate.edu by Friday, February 19th, 2016. Contact Debbie Garrity, 491-2513, deborah.garrity@colostate.edu with questions.

Presenters: Judy Brobst, Career Education Manager, Career Center-College of Natural Sciences Jim Zakely, Director, Health Professions Advising, Center for Advising and Student Achievement Jennifer Mueller, Professor & Graduate Director, Department of Mathematics

February 22, 2016
Tips on how to recreate the face-to-face classroom experience when taking online courses.
February 18, 2016
Understand how the perspectives we have of ourselves can either help or hinder the outcomes we desire.
February 18, 2016
The collaboration between Vietnam Forestry University (VFU) and CSU—particularly the

Warner College of Natural Resources—dates back to 1999 with the first visit by CSU faculty and the first graduate students from VFU. This led to a series of VFU graduate students at CSU, Dr. MacDonald spending a semester teaching in Vietnam, and a long-term curriculum development program that has stimulated a large number of faculty exchanges and an expanding relationship between CSU and VFU that is partly planned and partly pseudo- random. This seminar will discuss the lessons learned, unexpected limitations, and surprising benefits that may only result from longer-term interactions.

ALL ARE WELCOME! Lunch will be served. Please RSVP by February 16 to Mary.Dolce@colostate.edu.

Co-sponsored by WCNR International Affairs Committee and TILT

February 16, 2016
Understand how the perspectives we have of ourselves can either help or hinder the outcomes we desire.
February 15, 2016
Understand how the perspectives we have of ourselves can either help or hinder the outcomes we desire.
February 11, 2016
Presented by the CSU ATRC. Learn about apps that help you keep organized, take notes, and stay ahead.
February 9, 2016
Presented by the CSU ATRC. Learn about apps that help you keep organized, take notes, and stay ahead.
February 9, 2016
The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health. The faculty version models an effective interaction between an instructor and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important. A combination of learning modalities is used, including a realistic filmed scenario, participant discussion and a review of response options and campus resources.
February 8, 2016
Presented by the CSU ATRC. Learn about apps that help you keep organized, take notes, and stay ahead.
February 6, 2016
This free conference for CSU graduate students will provide tools and hands-on tips on how to make yourself more marketable to employers. The morning will include an alumni panel, and includes three breakout sessions on interpersonal and interviewing skills, networking skills and LinkedIn, and negotiation skills.
February 5, 2016
On February 5, 2016, Dr. Judith Simmer-Brown will be here at CSU to conduct our one-day grant funded CSU Mindfulness in the Classroom training. She will be using her book Meditation and the Classroom as a resource and this will be a interactive training session. It will be held on February 5, 2016 in the Grey Rock Room in LSC (Same space as our Center opening) from 9:00-4:00pm. Please sign up soon as space is limited. We look forward to seeing you there!
February 4, 2016
Fostering productive and beneficial relationships with instructors inside and outside the classroom walls.
February 2, 2016
Fostering productive and beneficial relationships with instructors inside and outside the classroom walls.
February 1, 2016
Fostering productive and beneficial relationships with instructors inside and outside the classroom walls.
January 28, 2016
An overview of the most pertinent skills and concepts that can help students achieve academic success.
January 26, 2016
An overview of the most pertinent skills and concepts that can help students achieve academic success.
January 25, 2016
An overview of the most pertinent skills and concepts that can help students achieve academic success.
January 19, 2016
This workshop defines the three major aspects contributing to robust learning (long-term recall, transfer, and acceleration of future learning) and summarizes findings from a 2013 survey of prior research on ten learning techniques thought to promote robust learning. By presenting highlights from explanations of five techniques that have moderate or high utility in promoting robust learning, the workshop will introduce attendees to techniques they may wish to apply. The explanation will include key points on where each technique is generalizable (and where it isn't), as well as on why it's effective. Attendees will work in small groups to consider how one technique (of the group's choice) may relate to their teaching or other endeavors, to develop possible applications, and to raise questions or issues for further discussion by the the whole group. Please register to attend as capacity is limited. To register please contact Merinda McLure at: merinda.mclure@colostate.edu
January 13, 2016
January Jan 11th, Jan 12th, and Jan 13th PDI offers CSU faculty members, state classified personnel, administrative professionals, and graduate students an opportunity to explore a wide range of topics designed to enhance their professional growth and personal enrichment.
January 12, 2016
January Jan 11th, Jan 12th, and Jan 13th PDI offers CSU faculty members, state classified personnel, administrative professionals, and graduate students an opportunity to explore a wide range of topics designed to enhance their professional growth and personal enrichment.
January 11, 2016 - January 13, 2016
January Jan 11th, Jan 12th, and Jan 13th PDI offers CSU faculty members, state classified personnel, administrative professionals, and graduate students an opportunity to explore a wide range of topics designed to enhance their professional growth and personal enrichment.
December 10, 2015
Tips for different exam formats. Making the most of your study time.
December 8, 2015
Tips for different exam formats. Making the most of your study time.
December 7, 2015
Tips for different exam formats. Making the most of your study time.
December 3, 2015
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated.
December 1, 2015
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated.
November 30, 2015
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated.
November 19, 2015
Understanding why you procrastinate, and how to change those habits.
November 17, 2015
Understand why you procrastinate, and how to change those habits.
November 17, 2015
Panel Presenters: Paul Laybourn, Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Erik Arthun, Instructor,Department of Biology; Sam Desta, KEY Coordinator, Center for Advising and Student Achievement

In 2010 a group of CNS instructors and science education researchers gathered to discuss how to improve life sciences instruction and concluded that more integrated chemistry and biology instruction was the solution. As a first step we developed a bridging course for KEY Health Professions LLC students enrolled in both introductory biology and general chemistry that we envision forming the basis more extensive curricular redesign.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to: cns@colostate.edu by Monday, November 16th, 2015.

Contact Debbie Garrity, 491-2513, deborah.garrity@colostate.edu with questions.
November 17, 2015

In this workshop we will discuss how to write exam questions and allow the use of cheat sheets to foster higher order thinking in our general microbiology courses as well as introducing Universal Design for Learning (UDL) into your course and why it’s important. I will share ways that we promote collaborative learning, as well as how we have incorporated hands-on models and flipped classes into our courses.

November 16, 2015
Understand why you procrastinate, and how to change those habits.
November 16, 2015

Peer instruction (student to student) is an interactive teaching strategy that can be used in the large lecture setting as well as in a small group setting (e.g., clinical rounds, recitation, etc.).

During this seminar, participants will explore peer instruction as a teaching strategy and discuss the research-based evidence for its effectiveness.

Snacks will be provided. For GTC students and faculty in the CVMBS program only. For registration please contact Dr. West at: Andrew.West2@colostate.edu
Dr. Andrew West is the Education Development Manager for CVMBS. His primary role is to support faculty in areas related to their teaching.
November 12, 2015
Techniques to deliver an effective and eloquent presentation.
November 11, 2015

Many instructors have heard last minute excuses and seen students omit citations for work. Additionally, with increased time commitments, the costs of attendance, and pressures to perform well, we may have seen our students grapple with completing their coursework honestly. Thus as instructors we are faced with more than teaching the course content and can also explore with students why they should choose ethical behaviors with their academics.

Come to this informative discussion of the academic misconduct process and learn more about what students share about academic integrity. Additionally, there is an opportunity to discuss helpful strategies to frame academic integrity in our classes to reinforce the norm that most students appreciate the culture of integrity at CSU. Our facilitators, Dr. Elaine Green, Director of Academic Integrity with TILT/CRSCS and Lindy Cartrite, Assistant Director of CRSCS, will share their insights and experiences with academic integrity at CSU.

Lunch is provided. Once you register, we will contact you with LSC box lunch options and take your order. RSVP to Kim Okamoto at kim.okamoto@colostate.edu

November 11, 2015
Please join us for lunch and a discussion about Microagressions: What are they and why do they matter. TILT is providing lunch for this event. To register please go to: Registration

November 10, 2015
Techniques to deliver an effective and eloquent presentation.
November 9, 2015
Techniques to deliver an effective and eloquent presentation.
November 5, 2015
Strategies to calm yourself before exams to boost your confidence.
November 4, 2015

Peer instruction (student to student) is an interactive teaching strategy that can be used in the large lecture setting as well as in a small group setting (e.g., clinical rounds, recitation, etc.).

During this seminar, participants will explore peer instruction as a teaching strategy and discuss the research-based evidence for its effectiveness.

Pizza will be provided. For GTC students and faculty in the CVMBS program only. For registration please contact Dr. West at: Andrew.West2@colostate.edu
Dr. Andrew West is the Education Development Manager for CVMBS. His primary role is to support faculty in areas related to their teaching.
November 2, 2015 - November 11, 2015
This four-session, interactive short course will serve as an introduction to the creation of web documents using web standards. The course is fast-paced. Please have a background in writing code, Photoshop, and/or graphic design, OR be highly motivated.These sessions will be on Mondays and Wednesdays, 11/2, 11/4, 11/9, and 11/11, 5:00 - 7:00 pm. Registration is limited to the first 18 students who sign up.
November 2, 2015
Strategies to calm yourself before exams to boost your confidence.
November 2, 2015

Research from the field of cognitive psychology has established practice testing as one of the most effective ways to enhance learning and retention, having been identified in a recent literature review as one of two methods (along with spaced study) as having the highest potential utility for improving student learning (Dunlosky et al., 2013).

Practice testing has direct benefits on learning, in that the act of retrieval reinforces learning and reduces forgetting of the information retrieved. It also has indirect benefits on learning by providing students with an indicator of how well they know the information, identifying what information does and does not need further study, and encouraging students to space their study.Tests should therefore be used in courses not just as tools for assessment and assignment of grades, but also as tools to enhance student learning and retention.

This presentation will describe a "mastery model" of practice testing in which students complete multiple practice tests, with feedback, such that the number of practice tests is based on each student’s individual mastery of the concepts. Testing is fully automated, using Canvas to deliver the practice tests and feedback, such that instructors do not need to devote valuable class time to the practice tests, or devote time and effort toward checking answers and providing feedback. The impact on exam performance will be discussed, along with students’ impressions of the technique.

October 29, 2015
Information-recall strategies. How to enhance your ability to focus.
October 29, 2015
Re-imagining higher education, re-engaging today's learners, going mobile with your students.
October 29, 2015

The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health.

The faculty version models an effective interaction between an instructor and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important.

A combination of learning modalities is used, including a realistic filmed scenario, participant discussion and a review of response options and campus resources.

October 29, 2015
Tools and Tips for Formatting Citations with Ease: Using today’s technology and online guides, we will explore ways to make citing your sources as easy as possible. Participants will get hands on practice with exporting citations directly from library databases. Presneted by Jimena Sagas, Library Assistant Professor
October 28, 2015
As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty position.

This Workshop Will:

  • Overview research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
  • Highlight the central information that should be included
  • Share strategies that ensure an engaging, succinct, and audience-appropriate document

This workshop may be counted toward the 12 workshops required for your Teaching Portfolio.
October 27, 2015
Information-recall strategies. How to enhance your ability to focus.
October 26, 2015
Information-recall strategies. How to enhance your ability to focus.
October 24, 2015
Please join us for this mini-conference focused on making the most of your graduate school experience. We will focus on navigating graduate school, professional conferences and publications.
October 22, 2015
How to dissect and think through information on a deeper level.
October 21, 2015
Please join us for a faculty panel discussion on how to navigate race conversations. To register please go to: Registration

October 21, 2015

Would you enjoy some clarity on CSU expectations for Instructors regarding student academic integrity and a strategy for reducing cheating, particularly on written work?

This presentation and discussion with your colleagues is designed to accomplish those two objectives. We will cover CSU reporting procedures and syllabi requirements and discuss using the CSU Honor Pledge in your courses.

For Registration please contact Pamela Coke at: Pamela.Coke@ColoState.EDU
October 20, 2015
How to dissect and think through information on a deeper level.
October 19, 2015
How to dissect and think through information on a deeper level.
October 15, 2015 - November 19, 2015
In this 5-session course, you will edit and produce three short videos, including a final video in your area of interest. The class will incorporate guest speakers from professionals in video production. DATES: Thursdays - 10/15, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19. This course will take you from start to finish in video production with an emphasis on producing professional quality videos within different genres. We will use Adobe Premiere as the primary editing software, but students will have the option at their discretion to use others. No prior video editing experience is necessary, though this class will also benefit those who already have video editing experience.
October 15, 2015
Merinda Kaye Hensley, Chair of the ACRL Student Learning and Information Literacy Committee, and a member of the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force, will explore the challenges and opportunities presented by the ACRL Framework through the lens of its theoretical underpinnings. Her presentation will focus on building increased understanding through practical examples around the essential components of the Framework, so that teaching librarians will better be able to use it to shape institutional conversations around critical thinking and information literacy instruction. Register to attend: Required, as capacity is limited. Please contact Merinda McLure merinda.mclure@colostate.edu
October 15, 2015
If you have never used or are new to using software to manage references for your written work, come learn about a powerful tool named EndNote. It can help you collect and organize in "libraries" reference (citation) data for the books, articles, and other resources that you use in your research. You can readily import/export to EndNote the citation data found in library databases, saving time and effort.
October 14, 2015
Showcasing the campus resources that can help you achieve academic success.
October 13, 2015 - November 10, 2015
Learn the basics of digital video editing, still and motion graphic design, and distribution in this FREE short course for CSU students. In this 5-session course, you will edit and produce three short videos, including a final video in your area of interest. The class will incorporate guest speakers from professionals in video production. DATES: 10/13, 10/20, 10/27, 11/3, 11/10. This course will take you from start to finish in video production with an emphasis on producing professional quality videos within different genres. We will use Adobe Premiere as the primary editing software, but students will have the option at their discretion to use others. No prior video editing experience is necessary, though this class will also benefit those who already have video editing experience.
October 12, 2015
Whether following Chicago, Turabian, MLA or APA styles, parenthetical and bibliographic citation is a central feature of academic writing. Yet, discourse circulating outside of academic contexts--boardrooms, pop media, hospitals, and private lives--demonstrates that socio-cultural expectations surrounding how and when to utilize attributional practices are highly variant. Within professional and technical contexts, for instance, practices such as ghost-writing, resourcing open content, and recycling boilerplate language reveal textual economies and standards which deviate markedly from the ways that citation and plagiarism are discussed and understood in academic contexts (Austin, 2008; Reyman, 2008). I begin by offering a brief overview of scholarship that demonstrates the critical importance of teaching attribution with sensitivity to a range of rhetorical contexts and their economies. To better understand the relationship between attributional norms and contexts, workshop participants will work in small groups to analyze texts such as hip-hop songs, press releases, university policies, instruction manuals, academic journals, and news reports. The activity attendees will participate in can be adapted for a variety of classrooms.
October 8, 2015
How do the topics of electronic thesis and dissertation publishing, research integrity, and intellectual property impact graduate students? What do you need to know to successfully publish your research? Dr. Jodie Redditi Hanzlik, Dean of the Graduate School, will moderate this session. Dr. Kathy Partin, Director of the Research Integrity and Compliance Review Office, Dawn Paschal, Assistant Dean- Library, and Ms. Linda Schutjer Esq., General Counsel will be panel participants.
October 7, 2015
Learn about plagiarism policies at CSU and how to properly use citations.
October 6, 2015
An understanding what constitutes plagiarism in the American university will be shared in this workshop.
October 6, 2015
Rasmus Hougaard and Jacqueline Carter are the Co-Directors of The Potential Project, the global leader in customized leadership and organizational training programs based on mindfulness. Corporate Based Mindfulness Training, CBMT has a proven track record of enhancing individual and collective performance, resilience and creativity. The Potential Project works with fortune 500 companies and educational institutions in 22 countries across North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. The objective of their programs is to enhance individual and organizational performance and well-being through skilful application of mindfulness in a work place context. Come meet Rasmus and Jacqueline, Co-Directors of The Potential Project and learn how Mindfulness in the workplace is re-defining our modern business culture, and the launch of their new book “One Second Ahead.” SPACE IS LIMITED - REGISTER TODAY: Register Here

October 6, 2015

We all think we do it…but do we do it…closely?

This session will demonstrate “close reading” techniques (a mainstay of literary criticism) as a useful practice for those who read and teach non-literary texts. Reading closely with students can enhance the quality of instruction and improve student learning in multiple disciplines.It can also help settle us into deeper reading even in our busy day-to-day lives.

Participants will do and share close readings to experience the “boost” and power of sustained attention to language and meaning. Because reading closely can be, believe it or not, powerful and super rewarding!

Goals and Objectives:

  • To introduce faculty and staff to a mainstay of literary critical practice in a fun and enjoyable way.
  • To encourage faculty and staff to pick and chose from a number of techniques that might work for them. Such as: noting key words, noting repetitions, making connections to similarly framed ideas within the text. Ultimately finding ways that will enhance their reading and teaching and working lives.
October 5, 2015

Are you a Graduate Student in either the SAHE, or SOE programs? If so, then this event is for you!

Become a facilitator in the mid-semester feedback program – Consult with students about positive change in the classroom and earn SAHE Independent Study or Practicum Credit. SOE participants can earn credit towards the OLPC or AET Capstone Course Requirements.

The time commitment to learn how to become a facilitator is roughly three hours. This includes an approximately 90-minute consultation with a TILT instructional designer and the time involved to conduct your first feedback session, which includes roughly 30 minutes in the classroom, 90 minutes to compile results, and 60 minutes to debrief the course instructor and collaboratively developing new strategies for the course based on student comments and recommendations.

What you will learn in the facilitator training:

  • Introduction
  • Background/History/Research of "The Classroom Meeting Model"
  • Discussion of the pros and cons of having the feedback session conducted by instructor-led versus facilitator-led methods
  • Video of in-class feedback session
  • Review step-by-step feedback process
  • Review facilitator/instructor debriefing session
  • Discussion of additional training resources
  • Conclusion
  • Post Training: Monthly meetings to discuss program

If you are interested, please email Dr. Debora Colbert at: Debora.Colbert@ColoState.edu for registration and more information
October 4, 2015 - October 31, 2015
Events this week will celebrate and help inform about what is considered academic integrity at CSU and how we should "Choose Integrity".
October 2, 2015
If you are a faculty member or teaching assistant trying to tackle the issues of climate change and sustainability, then you know how quickly the content can become overwhelming for students. This workshop is designed for participants who are already addressing environmental issues, climate disruption and sustainability in their teaching and want to go deeper into the challenges of this work, how to connect it to other content areas, and how to not feel utterly buried in it all. More specifically, this session digs deeply into the critical social justice connections to climate and environmental issues, explores any gaps or challenges in our current teaching of this content, and offers a pedagogical framework with which to address the connections between environment/climate/sustainability, social justice, and participant content areas with a hopeful look toward the future. Importantly, this session builds off of the previous day’s workshop and/or off of participants’ previous teaching experience regarding climate and social justice and is therefore not well suited for those who are in the initial stages of considering how to teach from both environmental / climate / sustainability and social justice perspectives. The workshop begins with the framing of a social justice lens, followed by a critical analysis of what sustainability, environmental justice and climate justice look like through that lens, opens up for sharing what folks are already doing and struggling with in their work, and concludes with concrete pedagogical suggestions that can be used across campus curricula to combine all of this content. If participants would like to bring examples of what they have been doing, that would be welcome and add greatly to the session.
October 1, 2015
How to approach your reading for best comprehension and retention.
October 1, 2015
The urgent nature of this climate moment cannot be denied nor ignored, and yet identifying the best path forward is often unclear and fraught with contention. In this talk, Dr. Hackman makes the case for having a social justice framework be the guiding lens through which we as a nation and a global community address the mitigation and adaptation responses to 21st century climate issues. Drawing from a wide range of academic, political and activist bodies of thought, this session identifies our current reality regarding climate issues, how we got here, and how a social justice lens is necessary to both avoid the traps of technocratic and politically untenable “solutions”, and to the development of responses that are forward thinking, honor our shared commitments to human dignity and justice, and place us in balance with the planet and its ecosystem.
October 1, 2015
The educative power of co-curricular spaces in higher education makes it one of the most powerful means for educating students about environmental issues, climate disruption, and sustainability. This session focuses on various dimensions of student affairs that are particularly conducive to educating students about climate change and suggests ways for student affairs professionals to engage in that learning. For example, the leadership development and community development aspects of student affairs, residence life, and other co-curricular aspects of higher education are two specific foci where this type of learning can be undertaken with vigor. As such, the session begins with a brief summary of where we are in this climate moment globally and nationally, how a social justice lens connects to that reality, and then turns the remainder of the session to the question of how we can engage students through a social justice lens in co-curricular spaces in order to teach for climate justice. The session is an introductory one and does not require any predisposition to climate science or social justice work.
October 1, 2015
There is no greater risk to our national and global well being in the 21st century than climate change. This is not to diminish the complicated nature of some of the most challenging issues within the various content areas across a college or university campus, but simply to acknowledge that climate change will impact every single aspect of our lives and likely exacerbate the existing complex problems and issues within all fields of study. As such, this session is designed for faculty and TA’s from all disciplines and is focused on how to incorporate the combined lenses of environmental justice / climate justice / sustainability and social justice into your teaching area. While these subjects have historically been relegated to their primary content areas (e.g. science for the former and humanities for the latter), the pressing issues surrounding climate disruption demand that every discipline prepare students to apply their learning to the larger climate question. This workshop offers some basic frameworks for how to do this content integration work and does so by delving into three major bodies of information: 1. Basic information about the current climate moment (applicable to any content area); 2. The relationship between issues of race, class and gender to sustainability, environmental justice and climate justice work; 3. Concrete pedagogical “what’s” and “how’s” for addressing this content across a university curricula. The session will be interactive as time allows, and will also offer resources for continued exploration of these topics.
September 30, 2015

The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health.

The faculty version models an effective interaction between an instructor and a distressed student. Participants explore common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important.

A combination of learning modalities is used, including a realistic filmed scenario, participant discussion and a review of response options and campus resources.

September 29, 2015
How to approach your reading for best comprehension and retention.
September 29, 2015
In recent years, science educators have achieved a broad consensus on how students learn. But there are many different visions of how to put these ideas into practice. I will share some of the relevant theory, some of the relevant experiments, the use of different educational technologies, and some practical tips for designing an effective college course in a typical institutional setting with typical constraints on time and resources.
September 28, 2015
How to approach your reading for best comprehension and retention.
September 24, 2015
Using what research says are the best ways to learn to enhance study habits.
September 22, 2015
Using what research says are the best ways to learn to enhance study habits.
September 21, 2015
Using what research says are the best ways to learn to enhance study habits.
September 19, 2015
This free conference for CSU graduate students will focus on exploring finding a balance in Graduate School. The morning will include a faculty panel, a hands on stress management session, and a keynote address.
September 18, 2015
“When will first-day jitters ever go away?” “How will I get through all these assignments?” “How can I better engage students in my class?” Feelings of teaching anxiety are completely normal, but they can easily transform the joy of instruction into a constant sense of worry and fear. In this interactive session, we will provide support for one another by discussing some causes of teaching anxiety and practical solutions for coping with this issue. Please contact Pam Coke for more information at Pamela.Coke.Colostate.edu
September 17, 2015
Different styles of note-taking. Using notes for maximum effectiveness.
September 15, 2015
Different styles of note-taking. Using notes for maximum effectiveness.
September 14, 2015
Different styles of note-taking. Using notes for maximum effectiveness.
September 10, 2015
How to prioritize and be productive. Scheduling tips.
September 10, 2015
The profile of today’s college-going population looks much different than it did decades ago. Students today are older, more experienced in work, and more socioeconomically and racially diverse than their peers of decades past. To support this growing population, there is an urgent need for librarians to consider how feminist pedagogy can improve information literacy sessions to better serve these students. This presentation will detail the various ways that academic librarians can teach research skills to students using a critical feminist lens. Attendees will also have an opportunity to discuss the benefits and challenges of applying critical pedagogies to the library classroom. Register to attend: Required, as capacity is limited. Please contact Merinda McLure merinda.mclure@colostate.edu
September 8, 2015
How to prioritize and be productive. Scheduling tips.
September 3, 2015
How to organize yourself and your course materials for the semester.
September 1, 2015
How to Organize yourself and your course materials for the semester.
August 31, 2015
How to organize yourself and your course materials for the semester.
August 17, 2015
GTA Training
August 13, 2015
This session, co-lead by Dr. Harold Gamble of the CSU Jann Benson Center for Ethics, will offer suggestions for leading a class session on academic integrity during the upcoming Academic integrity Month; October, 2015.
June 27, 2015 - June 28, 2015

Music positively affects almost every area of the brain — improving creativity, effecting perception of neutral faces, influencing brain development in children, listening ability and even enabling connections with non-verbal people in all stages of life including Alzheimer’s patients.

Join us for a week-end of lively discussion, exploration of meditation, and neuroscience in the classroom, in this closing OFF the HOOK Festival week-end, hosted by composer Bruce Adolphe.

This will be the perfect opportunity to understand on-going research studies about the effects of music and meditation on the brain, with leading neuroscientists in their fields. You will delve deeper into understanding what it is to be In the Zone — a state common to composers, performing musicians, and Tibetan monks, as well as a variety of meditation practices and Feldenkrais® Method.

Panelists Include:

  • Bruce Adolphe, composer and host
  • Dr. Rael Cahn, Brain and Creativity Institute neuroscientist studying meditation and it’s effect on the brain
  • Dr. Assal Habibi, Brain and Creativity Institute neuroscientist focusing on investigating the effects of music on the brain
  • Dr. Mac McGoldrick, Colorado State University faculty member in Philosophy and Director of the Energy Institute
  • Douglas Penick, author and Buddhist

Registration coming soon! Continuing Education Units information available by April 20. For a complete schedule of events please visit: With Music In Mind Conference

Neuroscience for the Classroom Registration Fee Note: Fee will be waived for those registering for 1.5 Continuing Education Units (CEUs) from CSU Online Plus and independently completing the remaining hours of the online Annenberg Learner series. Please see the CSU Online Plus website for more information for details and enter NIC code when purchasing tickets for the Sunday Self Comes to Mind Chamber Music Concert.

June 8, 2015 - June 28, 2015
Designing, developing and teaching an online class can be challenging and requires a unique set of skills, even for the most talented and motivated instructors. How do the online and face-to-face environments differ? How do you keep students engaged in an online environment? What is the best way to build an online community? And, how do you create meaningful online discussions? These questions and more will be answered in this introductory short course. In Best Practices for Online Course Design, we’ll cover such topics as strategies to manage and facilitate an online class, how to create measureable learning objectives and assignments that align to those objectives, the impact of online course structure on instruction and Universal Design for Learning. Additionally, you’ll discover resources to enhance your online courses, and establish effective online teaching strategies. Best of all, you’ll get hands-on practice as you build a draft learning module in Canvas and experience online learning from the student perspective. A foundation in each of these components will help you provide a superior learning environment for your students.
May 20, 2015 - May 21, 2015

We're very pleased to invite you to the 2015 TILT Summer Conference: Using Learning Research to Move Students from Consumers to Robust Learners. The keynote address will be given by Phil Winne, Professor of Educational Psychology, Simon Fraser University, on Wednesday May 20th.

Prof. Winne is an internationally recognized exeprt on self-regulated learning and learning technologies, as well as a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and the Canadian Psychological Association.

This year's Summer Conference will spotlight CSU faculty members' research on learning, teaching, and related topics. In doing so, it will emphasize:

  • Robust learning, which includes long-term retention of learned material
  • The capacity to transfer (and adapt) such material to new problems in unfamiliar situations, and
  • Accelerated future learning

The Conference begins a set of initiatives designed to encourage learning research at CSU and to help disseminate it in ways that promote robust learning by improving curricula, instructional delivery, instructors' professional development, and other relevant endeavors.

There will also be a second plenary session on the afternoon of May 20th. This will feature five-minute lightning talks by CSU researchers studying learning and teaching, followed by a discussion of the implications of this research for course and curriculum design and for instructional delivery. Each presenter will lead a two-hour workshop on May 21st on how attendees might draw on the research presented to improve some aspect of learning and/or teaching, whether curricular, cocurricular, or both.

May 14, 2015

Presented by Lorie Smith, CSU Director, Organizational Development and University Initiatives, and Dr. Patricia L. Mestas Vigil, CSU Director of University Partnerships and Student Success and Director of the Alliance Partnership.

This session will focus on the topic of training versus teaching: what do training and teaching share and how do they differ?

Pre-registration is required and space is limited: Please contact Merinda McLure at: Merinda.McLure@ColoState.edu
May 7, 2015
• Tips for different exam formats • Making the most of your study time
May 5, 2015
• Tips for different exam formats • Making the most of your study time
May 5, 2015

This hands-on workshop will demonstrate how to design learning materials to work well with technology for students who listen to materials using text-to-speech or screen reading software, or who convert text to an audio format for mobile use. The focus will be on formatting materials for audio navigation, and on providing a description of non-text elements that students can hear.

The workshop will be led by Allison Kidd, the IT Coordinator for the Assistive Technology Resource Center who specializes in preparing documents and web-based materials for use with various technology platforms.

May 4, 2015
• Tips for different exam formats • Making the most of your study time
April 30, 2015
• How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated
April 29, 2015
Essentials of Excel including an overview of cells, formulas, tables, and graphs, as well as PowerPoint presentation tips and tricks.
April 29, 2015
This past summer a task force of faculty and graduate students in the Department of Biology met to adapt a number of upper level Biology electives as capstone courses. Capstone courses integrate the expertise gained from multiple courses of the major, emphasize writing and self-directed learning, and may include professional development. Today’s speakers implemented their first pilot capstone courses in Fall 2014, and will offer insight on best practices for designing an effective capstone experience. RSVP Info: Email invitations will be sent, or contact Dr. Garrity
April 28, 2015
• How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated
April 28, 2015

In light of the digital literacies through which today’s students increasingly construct themselves and express their ideas, participants will learn how to build digital games to reimagine traditional pedagogies by leveraging principles of insistent design.

In this workshop, I will demonstrate how simple game design exercises can improve student engagement and interaction in classes in the social sciences. No experience programming necessary!

April 27, 2015
• How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated
April 24, 2015

Do you have a teaching idea you would like to share with colleagues? Do you have a question about how to teach a particular concept to students? Join us for this interactive session where participants are invited to be the presenters. Come prepared to talk teaching and to share your favorite tip.

April 23, 2015
• Strategies to calm yourself before exams to boost your confidence
April 22, 2015
An introduction to troubleshooting car problems including how to change a tire, jumpstart a car, and check engine oil.
April 22, 2015
Please join us for our final two conversations about integrating writing into courses across the disciplines. We are pleased to feature the experiences and reflections of CSU graduate student teachers who have been finding innovative and thoughtful ways to motivate student learning through writing in classrooms interactions, through feedback and even during office hours. All conversations will be held in Education, room 13.
April 20, 2015
• Strategies to calm yourself before exams to boost your confidence
April 20, 2015

Paul Thayer, CSU Vice President for Student Affairs, returns with Laura Jensen, Director, CSU Institutional Research, and Heather Novak, Coordinator, CSU Institutional Research, to talk with us about how and why the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA+) and the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) are administered at CSU. What is learned from these student assessments?

Pre-registration is required and space is limited: Please contact Merinda McLure to register at Merinda.McLure@ColoState.edu
April 16, 2015
• Translating your academic skills and experiences to a resume and career
April 15, 2015
How to eat healthy on a college budget including recipes, cooking tips, meal prep, and grocery lists fit for a fast-paced lifestyle.
April 15, 2015

Evelyn Swiss (RICRO) and Scot Allen (Office of Vice-President for Research) will unravel the perceived mystery of the IRB process, and specifically address and answer your questions about conducting research cross-culturally that involves human subjects.

Lunch Will Be Served

Please RSVP by noon Tuesday April 14 to Mary Dolce at mary.dolce@colostate.edu
April 13, 2015
• Translating your academic skills and experiences to a resume and career
April 9, 2015
• Learn what to consider in deciding if graduate school is right for you
April 8, 2015
Managing complex relationships with roommates, family members, significant others, co-workers, and employers.
April 8, 2015
Please join us for a series of conversations about how to integrate writing into courses across the disciplines. We are pleased to feature the experiences and reflections of CSU graduate student teachers who have been finding innovative and thoughtful ways to motivate student learning through writing in classrooms interactions, through feedback and even during office hours. All conversations will be held in Education, room 13.

Registration Not Required

April 6, 2015
• Learn what to consider in deciding if graduate school is right for you
April 6, 2015

Beginning in the fall 2014 semester, we were provided with funding to develop a Writing to Learn (WTL) program in the College of Natural Sciences at Colorado State University. The first year of the program has been devoted to developing faculty understanding of WTL, to the development of WTL activities - specifically in Mathematics and Physics, and to exploring the importance and best approaches to giving meaningful feedback. The ultimate goal of the program is to address the student experience in gateway courses across the College of Natural Sciences.

In this presentation we will provide the framework of the WTL program, provide prompts that emerged from our processes, and share sample student responses.

April 6, 2015

This presentation will highlight the growing need for campus-wide personnel to develop an understanding of students on the Autism Spectrum (ASD) and to cultivate strategies and approaches to support these students in a higher education setting.

We will address common misperceptions, strengths, and challenges of students with ASD on a college campus, provide case examples of some of these students within multiple domains of college life, and outline campus resources for students with ASD.

Finally, simple tips, and strategies for anyone in higher education working with students with ASD will be discussed.

April 2, 2015
• Techniques to deliver an effective and confident presentation
March 31, 2015
• Techniques to deliver an effective and confident presentation
March 30, 2015
• Techniques to deliver an effective and confident presentation
March 30, 2015

In recent years, increasingly larger number of educators have begun using social media such as Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, and other platforms as means of extending student discussion outside the physical confines of the classroom and creating deep learning opportunities even for students in large, introductory classes.

This workshop will provide numerous examples, training in usage, and potential means for employing such technologies and provide an opportunity for discussion of the rules of the road for safe, successful usage of social media in an academic setting

March 28, 2015
This free conference for CSU graduate students will focus on exploring "best fit" in terms of workplace culture. The morning will include a keynote speech followed by three breakout sessions with representatives from different sectors.
March 26, 2015
• Information-recall strategies • How to enhance your ability to focus
March 25, 2015
Please join us for a series of conversations about how to integrate writing into courses across the disciplines. We are pleased to feature the experiences and reflections of CSU graduate student teachers who have been finding innovative and thoughtful ways to motivate student learning through writing in classrooms interactions, through feedback and even during office hours. All conversations will be held in Education, room 13.

Registration Not Required

March 24, 2015
• Information-recall strategies • How to enhance your ability to focus
March 24, 2015
This workshop will discuss some of the pros and cons of flipping your class, identify some of the fundamental elements of active learning in the classroom, and how to go about changing the interactions and engagement with your students. SPACE IS LIMITED - Sign up today!
March 23, 2015
• Information-recall strategies • How to enhance your ability to focus
March 12, 2015
• Understand why you procrastinate • Build goals to keep you motivated
March 12, 2015

The Notice and Respond: Assisting Students in Distress workshops were developed as part of a broad public health approach to help our campus community understand the potential role they play in maintaining campus mental health.

The 90 minute faculty version models an effective interaction between a faculty member and a distressed student. Participants explore shared experiences and common concerns that may present barriers to taking action, and learn why a proactive response is vitally important. A combination of learning modalities is used, including a realistic filmed scenario, participant discussion and a review of response options and campus resources.


March 11, 2015
Please join us for a series of conversations about how to integrate writing into courses across the disciplines. We are pleased to feature the experiences and reflections of CSU graduate student teachers who have been finding innovative and thoughtful ways to motivate student learning through writing in classrooms interactions, through feedback and even during office hours. All conversations will be held in Education, room 13.

Registration Not Required

March 10, 2015
• Understand why you procrastinate • Build goals to keep you motivated
March 10, 2015

As post-secondary teachers, it is becoming increasingly more important to articulate an individual teaching philosophy and that it be available for review when applying for a college or university faculty position.

This Workshop Will:

  • Overview research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
  • Highlight the central information that should be included
  • Share strategies that ensure an engaging, succinct, and audience-appropriate document
This workshop may be counted toward the six workshops required for your Teaching Portfolio.
March 9, 2015
• Understand why you procrastinate • Build goals to keep you motivated
March 9, 2015

This workshop will offer information on a course redesign for a large 100 level class, and the workshop example for this is ART100. A large (97 seat) Arts & Humanities course for non-Art majors traditionally presented primarily through instructor lecture.

The Art team (course instructor and visual resource librarian) teamed with course designers at TILT to develop a project that ‘flips’ the classroom to further engage students using instructional sequencing, visual literacy components, and write-to-learn and write-to-engage strategies as part of a collaborative group project.

Natalie Barnes and Anna Bernhard will be co-presenting this workshop. Anna is the Director for the Wold Resource Center and an integral part in the ART100 course redesign project that will be presented. Natalie is a key academic advisor and adjunct instructor who has taught at CSU for over 10 years. They will be presenting this project in New Orleans at the National Art Education Association convention as well, in March.

March 5, 2015
• How to be more present in the moment • How mindfulness can help with stress
March 5, 2015

Are students producing work that meets your expectations? Do some students miss the point of an assignment and turn in something different? Are they baffled by their grade? If so, they may be unclear about your expectations and a rubric may be the solution.

Rubrics are a tool to communicate and measure pre-defined grading criteria. Developing a rubric and sharing it with students ahead of time can result in student work better aligned with the assignment criteria and make the feedback process less subjective, especially if TA's are grading assignments. You will leave the workshop with sample rubrics as well as starting one of your own.

This is a working session, please bring an assignment you would like to work on.
March 4, 2015
Grounded in the belief that “all learning has an emotional base,” Notice and Respond workshops reveal not only the dynamics of mental health situations, but also the undercurrents of human interaction around mental health situations. The interactive workshop uses a combination of learning modalities to learn how to recognize and respond to a range of mental health issues including suicide. RSVP Info: Email invitations will be sent, or contact Dr. Garrity
March 2, 2015
• How to be more present in the moment • How mindfulness can help with stress
February 26, 2015
• Learn about apps that help you keep organized, take notes, and stay ahead
February 25, 2015 - April 1, 2015
Learn the basics of digital video editing, still and motion graphic design, and distribution in this FREE short course for CSU students.

In this 5-session course, you will edit and produce three short videos, including a final video in your area of interest. The class will incorporate guest speakers from professionals in video production.

This course will take you from start to finish in video production with an emphasis on producing professional quality videos within different genres. We will use Adobe Premiere as the primary editing software, but students will have the option at their discretion to use others.

No prior video editing experience is necessary, though this class will also benefit those who already have video editing experience.

February 25, 2015
Please join us for a series of conversations about how to integrate writing into courses across the disciplines. We are pleased to feature the experiences and reflections of CSU graduate student teachers who have been finding innovative and thoughtful ways to motivate student learning through writing in classrooms interactions, through feedback and even during office hours. All conversations will be held in Education, room 13.

Registration Not Required

February 24, 2015

This hands-on workshop will demonstrate how to design learning materials to work with technology.

Specifically, how to make PDF documents searchable, how to format Word documents using Styles, and formatting PPT presentations for multiple uses. Formatting these materials prior to embedding them in various technology platforms enables students to access the content through multiple media and technological tools, thus supporting students of all abilities to engage the material.

The workshop will be led by Allison Kidd, the IT Coordinator for the Assistive Technology Resource Center who specializes in preparing documents and web-based materials for use with various technology platforms.

February 19, 2015
How to create assessments (tests) that assess what you really feel is important in your course. We will discuss how to write meaningful tests, and how to determine if your tests are testing your expected learning outcomes.
February 16, 2015
Paul Thayer, Vice President for Student Affairs, and Alan Lamborn, Associate Provost, will present on the campus Student Success Initiative (SSI). Pre-registration is required and space is limited: Please email Merinda McLure to register.
February 14, 2015 - March 7, 2015
Are you planning on attending graduate school, but nervous about taking the GRE? Are you unsure of what you should study?

This course is a confidence builder. We will talk you through each section of the exam, go over the logistics, and review the formatting.

Much of the course will be spent discussing strategies for answering questions as well as completing practice questions similar to those on the actual exam.

Dates:

Sat: Feb. 14 – 10 am - 4 pm - Overview and Verbal Reasoning

Sat: Feb. 21 – 10 am - 4 pm - Verbal Reasoning/Analytical Writing

Sat: Feb. 28 – 10 am - 4 pm - Quantitative Reasoning

Sat: Mar. 7 – 10 am - 4 pm - Quantitative Reasoning

Cost: $200

For more information, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/shortcourses/grePrep.cfm

February 13, 2015
Come by Room 105 in the Behavioral Sciences Building to see this new "flipped classroom" between 3:00 and 5:00 pm. Staff from the University will be there to discuss the room's technology features, room scheduling, and the "flipped classroom" concept.
February 13, 2015

Digital Repository and Other Long Term Archiving Resources on Campus

Our guest speaker will be Shea Swauger, Data Management Librarian from Morgan Library. (We will stream the session live and capture the event using Echo 360, however neither will be interactive. You will find the link on the College IT webpage.)

College of Agricultural Sciences Faculty, Staff, Graduate students and other interested individuals are welcome to attend. To register email Ken Barbarick.


RSVP Required (PLEASE! If there is significant interest, we may need to find a different room)
February 12, 2015
Please register for this session if you have enrolled in the GTA Certificate of Completion Program and have received a message from either Rachael Brothers or Debi Colbert. Thank you.
February 10, 2015

Most of us use PowerPoint or other presentation systems as a teaching tool. But if you are simply presenting slides with bulleted lists and a few figures, you aren't taking full advantage of the capabilities of this software. And if you are simply presenting slides with bulleted lists and a few figures, you might not be using your class time to best effect.

I’ll give some tips for spicing up your slides and making your teaching more effective.

February 9, 2015
Here’s your opportunity to finally put your student’s cellphones, tablets and laptops to good use! Judy Ng from TOP HAT will be visiting with us from Toronto to present a classroom engagement platform that creates interactive lectures using technology students already own. Lunch is provided so RSVP with Doug Hoffman!
February 7, 2015
This free conference for CSU graduate students will provide tools and hands-on tips on how to make yourself more marketable to employers. The morning will include an alumni panel, and the afternoon includes three breakout sessions plus drop-in consultations on your CV and LinkedIn page.

8-8:30 Registration, Breakfast, Networking

8:30-8:45 Welcome: Tammi Vacha-Haase, The Graduate School; Deb Colbert, TILT

8:45-10 Alumni Panel: Skills to make yourself more marketable on the job search-- Facilitated by Therese Lask, Director, CSU Alumni Relations

10:15-12:15 Concurrent Breakout sessions on the following topics:

* Basic Interpersonal and Interviewing Skills

* Networking Skills and LinkedIn

* Negotiation Skills

10:15-12:30 Drop-in consults (Career Center/Alumni look individually over grad student materials)

* CV rush

* LinkedIn page reviews

February 6, 2015
Please register for this session if you have enrolled in the GTA Certificate of Completion Program and have received a message from either Rachael Brothers or Debi Colbert. Thank you.
February 3, 2015

In this session, participants will engage in designing assignments that meet the needs of the instructor as well as the students. Attendees are encouraged to bring any relevant course materials: syllabi, assignment sheets, etc.

This will be a hands-on workshop where we will engage with:

  • Identifying course objectives
  • Defining instructor expectations and course demands
  • Exploring student needs
  • Designing and adapting course assignments with a focus on student--and instructor--engagement.

February 3, 2015
Come by BSB 105 to see the "Flipped Classroom" between 2:00 and 4:00pm. Staff from the University will be there to discuss the room's technology features, room scheduling, and the "flipped classroom" concept.
February 3, 2015
Please register for this session if you have enrolled in the GTA Certificate of Completion Program and have received a message from either Rachael Brothers or Debi Colbert. Thank you.
February 2, 2015
Please register for this session if you have enrolled in the GTA Certificate of Completion Program and have received a message from either Rachael Brothers or Debi Colbert. Thank you.
January 27, 2015
- How to prioritize and be productive - Scheduling tips
January 26, 2015
- How to prioritize and be productive - Scheduling tips
December 17, 2014

Teaching Uniquely: Using Archives and Special Collections Materials in Instructional Sessions. The presenters will discuss practices and methods in the instruction that they provide in archives and special collections.

Pre-registration is required and space is limited: Please email Merinda McLure to register at Merinda.McLure@Colostate.edu.

December 11, 2014
Tips for different exam formats, making the most of your study time.
December 10, 2014

Microaggressions are the everyday verbal and nonverbal environmental slights, snubs, and insults, which (whether intentional or unintentional) communicate hostility and negativity in the workplace.

Join the Office of the Vice President for Diversity and The Institute for Learning and Teaching for lunch and an informal panel discussion focused on: managing microaggressions in the workplace, strategies to recognize and combat them, and what our fellow faculty have done to rise above them.

December 9, 2014
Tips for different exam formats, making the most of your study time.
December 8, 2014
Tips for different exam formats, making the most of your study time.
December 1, 2014
Translating your academic skills and experience to a resume and career. Presented by the Career Center.
November 20, 2014
Understand why you procrastinate, and how to change those habits.
November 19, 2014

The College of Natural Sciences presents an MTI lunch and Lecture. The presentation will discuss how CNS faculty can provide an effective experience through: honors courses, breakout sessions and more.

Presenters Include:

  • Dr. Don Mykles, Professor
  • Department of Biology
  • Director University Honors Program

Panelists Include:

  • Dr. Lisa Angeloni, Department of Biology
  • Dr. Greg Florant, Department of Biology
  • Dr. Gerwyn Green, Department of Statistics
  • Dr. Stephen Ogle, National Resource Ecology Laboratory
Please RSVP to: cns@lamar.colostate.edu by Monday November 17th 2014

November 18, 2014
Understand why you procrastinate, and how to change those habits.
November 17, 2014
Understand why you procrastinate, and how to change those habits.
November 17, 2014

Alison Hicks will present on the topic of critical information literacy.

Pre-Registration is required: Please email Merinda McLure to register at Merinda.McLure@ColoState.EDU

November 14, 2014

Our guest speaker will be Shea Swauger, Data Management Librarian from Morgan Library.

In this Session We Will Cover: Time Travel - Preserving Your Data for the Future

  • Media and Software Obsolescence
  • Bit Rot
  • Meta- Data
  • Big/Large Data sets

We will stream the session live and capture the event using Echo 360, however neither will be interactive. You will find the link on the College IT webpage.

College of Agricultural Sciences Faculty, Staff , Graduate students and other interested individuals are welcome to attend.

Please RSVP to Ken.Barbarick@colostate.edu, subject: Data Management, by November 12th. If there is significant interest, we may need to find a different room.

Lunch will be provided by Paninos, and the lunch menu will be sent out when you register
November 13, 2014
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated.
November 13, 2014

You have an expertise and many lessons to share your students. There’s only so much you can share within a class period.

How are we teaching students about the culture of our field? How can we mold students to be leaders in their disciplines?

In This Session We Will:

  • Discuss programs and opportunities that are available for faculty to engage students outside of the classroom.
  • Talk about why these programs exist and how students are making meaning out of their participation.
  • Most importantly, we will talk about what it might mean for you and the future of your discipline.
Your lunch order serves as your RSVP. Please RSVP no later than 5:00 PM next Tuesday, November 11th.

November 11, 2014
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated.
November 11, 2014

Recent clinical research on mindfulness practices has shown multiple benefits that may offer an increased ability to transform stress, improve mental clarity, and help with concentration.

This session is designed to explore mindfulness, meditation, and supportive yoga breath for your daily life, both in and out of the classroom.

This session will include:

  • An overview of the multiple physical, and mental health benefits of mindfulness.
  • Offer background on mindfulness and yoga breath practice.
  • Discuss strategies for the classroom, and engage participants in "hands-on" practice of these techniques.

Audience participation will be invited in a "learning circle" format. A "start where you are" philosophy is embraced and no previous experience is required.

Practice sessions will range from 5-15 minutes, followed with time to share experiences and learn from each other.

November 10, 2014
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated.
November 7, 2014

In recent years, science educators have achieved a broad consensus on how students learn. But there are many different visions of how to put these ideas into practice.

In This Session I will:

  • Share some of the relevant theory and results in student learning.
  • Introduce the use of different educational technologies.
  • Share some practical tips for designing an effective college course in an institutional setting, with real constraints on time and resources.
November 6, 2014
Strategies to calm yourself before exams to boost your confidence. Presented by the CSU Health Network.
November 5, 2014

As national and Colorado demographics continue to diversify, classrooms continue to encompass more historically underrepresented populations.
The need to develop more inclusive teaching and classroom management techniques to engage all students across diverse backgrounds is essential to ensure student success.

The Office of the Vice president for Diversity, in partnership with TILT, will host an interactive faculty panel to discuss:

  • Inclusive classroom techniques
  • Experiences and challenges in creating a welcoming classroom
  • And inclusive pedagogy which engages all students across race, gender, class, and ability
Light lunch will be provided to participants.

November 3, 2014
Strategies to calm yourself before exams to boost your confidence.Presented by the CSU Health Network.
October 30, 2014
How to approach your reading for best comprehension and retention.
October 30, 2014

This seminar will focus on experiential learning and teaching students to think like a scientist in the lab. How do you accomplish that during class periods?

Come find out how to teach students to move past memorization and into practice! By letting students have the opportunity to practice, and see what you want them to be able to DO. This allows them to participate in experiential learning, thus producing more effective and lasting results.

October 29, 2014

Our roles as teachers are becoming increasingly important in the academy, and a Teaching Philosophy is an important document to include in any application for a college or university faculty position.

This Workshop Will:

  1. Overview research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
  2. Highlight the central information that should be included
  3. Share strategies that ensure an engaging, succinct, and audience-appropriate document
More information about preparation can be found at: TILT Certificates and Workshops

October 29, 2014

Critical thinking, problem solving, and/or clinical reasoning have long been difficult concepts to teach novices. Many experts who have keen reasoning skills are unable to explain, let alone teach, the mental processes they use to quickly analyze a situation and produce a short list of sound hypotheses.

In the medical world, lack of advanced clinical reasoning skills can lead to life-threatening misdiagnoses, but the same can be said of any field where mistakes in reasoning can lead to critical errors.

Goals and Objectives:

In this session we will:

  • Present a clinical reasoning reiterative process adapted to veterinary medicine.
  • Participate in activities we have developed, to train students in this important skill from year 1 of the 4-year program.
We will provide some time at the end of the presentation to brainstorm adaptations of the process or the activities for your own classroom.

October 28, 2014
YEAR 2 @ CSU and TILT Learning Programs introduces the CSU True Faculty Story Dinner Series just for Second Year Students. This program provides an opportunity second year for students to establish meaningful connections with professors and faculty from their colleges, departments, or similar backgrounds.

October 28, 2014
How to approach your reading for best comprehension and retention.
October 27, 2014
How to approach your reading for best comprehension and retention.
October 25, 2014
Tammi Wacha-HaaseDeb ColbertProfessional Activities while in Graduate School Sessions will include navigating graduate school successfully, getting involved in professional Organizations, tips for presenting at an academic conference, and moving towards publication, ethical and legal issues you need to know.
October 24, 2014

In 2014 the Association of College and Research Libraries is incrementally releasing, and revising through feedback from librarian and higher education stakeholders, a new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.

This interactive session will explore the Framework, consider its emphasis on threshold concepts and metaliteracy, and engage participants in discussing and envisioning the application of the Framework in collaborations between course instructors and librarians.

Goals and Objectives:

This session will:

  • Introduce the new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education in its current form.
  • Consider the Framework’s emphasis on threshold concepts and metaliteracy.
  • Engage attendees in envisioning the application of the Framework in collaborations between course instructors and librarians.
October 23, 2014
How to be more present in the moment. How mindfulness can help with stress.
October 22, 2014
Please register for this session if you have enrolled in the GTA Certificate of Completion Program and have received a message from either Rachael Sutton or Debi Colbert. Thank you.
October 21, 2014
Please register for this session if you have enrolled in the GTA Certificate of Completion Program and have received a message from either Rachael Sutton or Debi Colbert. Thank you.
October 20, 2014
How to be more present in the moment. How mindfulness can help with stress.
October 16, 2014
This workshop presents perspectives and best practices for assimilating science content matter as well as delving into study strategies to best tackle the ALEKS system of chemistry problems. The final portion of the workshop will cover broader test-taking skills and present academic resources for undergraduate science students. This is part II of the two course seminar.
October 15, 2014
This workshop presents perspectives and best practices for assimilating science content matter as well as delving into study strategies to best tackle the ALEKS system of chemistry problems. The final portion of the workshop will cover broader test-taking skills and present academic resources for undergraduate science students. This is part II of the two course seminar.
October 14, 2014 - October 23, 2014
This four-session, interactive short course will serve as an introduction to the creation of web documents using web standards. The course is fast-paced and you will get the most out of it if you attend all four sessions. Registration is limited to the first 18 students who sign up. Topics covered will include: Standards-based (tableless) layouts Linked cascading style sheets (CSS) CSS classes, IDs, properties Image preparation Multimedia elements Pre-req: must be Photoshop proficient Registration is required.
October 14, 2014
Showcasing the campus resources that can help you achieve academic success.
October 13, 2014
Sarah Zwick-Tapley, has worked professionally as an actor, director, and comic. Her workshop will emphasize how to build dynamism as a speaker and how to work with slides and Power Point in a captivating way.

Please RSVP to: cns@lamar.colostate.eduby Friday, October 10th, 2014.

October 9, 2014 - November 13, 2014
Learn the basics of digital video editing, still and motion graphic design, and distribution in this FREE short course for CSU students. In this 6-session course, you will edit and produce three short videos, including a final video in your area of interest. The class will incorporate guest speakers from professionals in video production. This course will take you from start to finish in video production with an emphasis on producing professional quality videos within different genres. We will use Adobe Premiere as the primary editing software, but students will have the option at their discretion to use others. No prior video editing experience is necessary, though this class will also benefit those who already have video editing experience.
October 9, 2014
If you have never used or are new to using software to manage references for your written work, come learn about a powerful tool named EndNote. It can help you collect and organize in "libraries" reference (citation) data for the books, articles, and other resources that you use in your research. You can readily import/export to EndNote the citation data found in library databases, saving time and effort.
October 8, 2014
How much do you really know about ethics and copyright? The reality is that 90% of ethical and copyright violations are a result of insufficient information and the failure to ask questions, but the consequences can be huge. This session goes over the basics of copyright and scholarly communication ethics so that you as an author are sure of your rights and responsibilities as a member of the scientific community. Full schedule at: http://tilt.colostate.edu/integrity/index.cfm
October 7, 2014 - November 11, 2014
Learn the basics of digital video editing, still and motion graphic design, and distribution in this FREE short course for CSU students. In this 6-session course, you will edit and produce three short videos, including a final video in your area of interest. The class will incorporate guest speakers from professionals in video production. This course will take you from start to finish in video production with an emphasis on producing professional quality videos within different genres. We will use Adobe Premiere as the primary editing software, but students will have the option at their discretion to use others. No prior video editing experience is necessary, though this class will also benefit those who already have video editing experience.
October 7, 2014

This is an unprecedented time in the human experience as we face an array of extremely complicated local, national and global challenges. As such how we educate, engage and prepare 21st century college and university graduates requires an equally complex, global and critically analytical approach.

One key element to that approach is the development and utilization of a social justice education lens on the part of university faculty. Unfortunately, “social justice” has been so overused this last decade that it has lost some of its precision of meaning, which in turn has led to a watering down of its efficacy.

This session addresses the question of “what is ‘social justice education’?” and then examines its application in three key areas:

  • our capacity to critically self-­?reflect as educators
  • its pedagogical implementation across all academic disciplines
  • and its indispensability to any 21st century higher educational environment.

More specifically, the session begins with a clear commentary about what social justice education “is” and “is not” within higher education. This is followed by the presentation of a social justice education self-­?reflection matrix, a handful of social justice education case study examples from across university curricula, and a summary of how social justice education frameworks critically shape 21st century higher education.

The session is both content driven and interactive and thus participants are expected to engage with the content and with each other.

October 7, 2014

There is no greater risk to our national and global well being in the 21st century than climate change. That is not to diminish the incredible complexity of some of the most challenging issues within the various content areas across a college or university campus, but simply to acknowledge that climate change will impact every single aspect of our lives and likely exacerbate the existing complex problems and issues within all fields of study.

As such, this workshop highlights the need to address climate change, social justice and sustainability in every content area on campus and offers some basic frameworks for how to do that, no matter the curricular focus. Specifically, this workshop addresses: is broken into three major parts:

  1. Basic information about the current climate moment (applicable to any content area);
  2. The relationship of issues of race, class and gender to sustainability and climate justice work;
  3. Concrete pedagogical “what’s” and “how’s” for addressing this content across a university curricula.
October 5, 2014 - October 9, 2014
Workshops for students designed to 1) understand the nuances of expectations for integrity in your schoolwork, 2) learning how to avoid unintentional plagiarism, and 3) exploring the connection between academic and professional ethics in CSU majors.
October 2, 2014
Information-recall strategies. How to enhance your ability to focus.
September 30, 2014
Information-recall strategies. How to enhance your ability to focus.
September 30, 2014
Dr. Ed DeLosh, CSU Department of Psychology, will present. Dr. DeLosh’s areas of specialization include human learning and memory, aging and memory, and concept learning. Register: Pre-registration is required and space is limited. Please contact Merinda McLure
September 30, 2014
Please register for this session if you have enrolled in the GTA Certificate of Completion Program and have received a message from either Rachael Sutton or Debi Colbert. Thank you.
September 30, 2014
Please register for this session if you have enrolled in the GTA Certificate of Completion Program and have received a message from either Rachael Sutton or Debi Colbert. Thank you.
September 29, 2014
Information-recall strategies. How to enhance your ability to focus.
September 29, 2014
Please register for this session if you have enrolled in the GTA Certificate of Completion Program and have received a message from either Rachael Sutton or Debi Colbert. Thank you.
September 29, 2014
This workshop will encourage CSU faculty to articulate global learning outcomes and think about designing learning environments to achieve them. The workshop will use backward design to integrate and align global learning outcomes in course syllabi, curricula, pedagogies, class activities, and assessment. Participants should bring a course sylabus or set of program learning goals for discussion. Lunch will be provided.
September 26, 2014
Please register for this session if you have enrolled in the GTA Certificate of Completion Program and have received a message from either Rachael Sutton or Debi Colbert. Thank you.
September 26, 2014

How many times have you struggled with data organization? How have you responded to data management/data sharing policies enacted by granting agencies recently? Have you been concerned about the long-term sustainability of your data?

If any of these are true, please join us at the first of four College hosted Data management classes, September 26, as part of the Master Teaching Initiative brown bag series. The focus is research data, but the discussion should be useful to many others. We will hold one more session at the end of the semester and two in the spring.

We will stream this session live and capture the event using Echo 360, however neither will be interactive. You will find the link on the College IT webpage.

College of Agricultural Sciences Faculty, Staff, Graduate students, and other interested individuals are welcome to attend.

Note: RSVP required. PLEASE! If there is significant interest, we may need to find a different room). To register, please click on "Register for this Event" below no later than 5:00 pm, Wednesday, September 24, 2014. You will receive a confirmation email with a Panino’s menu from which you may order your lunch.

September 25, 2014
Using what research says are the best ways to learn to enhance study habits.
September 25, 2014
This workshop presents perspectives and best practices for assimilating science content matter as well as delving into study strategies to best tackle the ALEKS system of chemistry problems. The final portion of the workshop will cover broader test-taking skills and present academic resources for undergraduate science students.
September 25, 2014
Cynthia TateAccording to the Center for Disease Control’s new stats (March 28, 2014) on the prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) among children aged 8 years, one in 68 now have some type of ASD. Many of whom are those with higher functioning Autism or Asperger’s Syndrome who are matriculating to higher education and will continue to at increasing rate. This presentation provides insight on what ASDs are, relates common strengths and challenges associated with this population; and, shares emerging instructional approaches that assist learning while improving retention and graduation rates for all students. Goals/Objectives: Audience participants will gain an understanding of what Autism Spectrum Disorders are and what they are not.
  • ASDs defined
  • Growing numbers and how this impacts institutes of higher education
  • Dispelling myths associated with ASDs
  • Common strengths and challenges as related to academics and campus life
  • The many variances: a couple case studies
Participants will learn some of the emerging instructional approaches that foster learning and growth for students with Asperger’s while also benefiting all students.
  • Importance of structure: syllabus, assignments, expectations, procedures, guidelines, changes in routine
  • Emotional climate: reducing stress/anxiety- triggers, one-on-one check in, preparation
  • Environmental factors: lighting, positioning, stimuli – sights and sounds
  • Promoting successful group teaching/learning experiences
  • Encouraging self-advocacy, a key indicator of success
Participants will be informed of online available resources.
September 23, 2014
Using what research says are the best ways to learn to enhance study habits.
September 23, 2014
We will share what we learned at Campus Compact’s Engaged Faculty Institute about Community-engaged Learning. The content will include an explanation of CEL, models for implementation, how to build community partnerships, the role of critical reflection, and best practices. Goals and objectives: To discuss CEL
  • What we thought it was, what it is and is not (i.e., moving beyond charity and volunteer models of service to community-engagement as a pedagogical method for teaching and learning)
  • The four models (Direct, Indirect, Community-engaged Research, Advocacy)
  • The importance of community partners and fostering mutually-beneficial relationships
  • The importance of consistently linking engagement activities to learning objectives through critical reflection
  • Practices: Assignments, Assessments, Evaluation
Participants will: be able to identify methods of CEL, become aware of challenges and benefits of implementing CEL and engage in discussions on best practices. This session is appropriate for graduate students, instructors and faculty from all disciplines and with any level of experience interested in learning foundational information about CEL and/or adding to the discussion.
September 22, 2014
This workshop presents perspectives and best practices for assimilating science content matter as well as delving into study strategies to best tackle the ALEKS system of chemistry problems. The final portion of the workshop will cover broader test-taking skills and present academic resources for undergraduate science students
September 22, 2014
Using what research says are the best ways to learn to enhance study habits.
September 22, 2014 - November 2, 2014
Are you planning on attending graduate school, but nervous about taking the GRE? are you unsure of what you need to study to be prepared for the exam? This short course will build your confidence by going over the exam logistics, talking through the different sections of the exam and the format of exam questions in each section, give you the opportunity to complete practice exam questions, and provide additional tips for preparing and studying for the GRE. Much of the course will be spent discussing strategies for answering questions and completing practice questions similar to those on the actual exam. For more information, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/shortcourses/grePrep.cfm
September 20, 2014
Tammi Wacha-HaaseDeb ColbertThis will be a morning of networking with other CSU graduate students and faculty. Sessions will focus on managing the pressures and priorities of graduate school, Stress Management/well-being techniques in a workshop style, as well as a keynote address related to developing yourself as a professional during graduate school, work/life balance and finding meaning in your work.
September 19, 2014
Want to learn how a website originally designed to annotate rap music can be used in the classroom? This workshop will introduce the basics of Rap Genius and Thinglink, two free, web-based digital tools which enable students to make public or semi-private multimedia annotations to texts (Genius.com) and images (thinglink.com).

Your lunch order serves as your RSVP. The luncheon is free, thanks to the generous support of TILT and the College of Liberal Arts. You can order your lunch by following the link below. Please RSVP no later than 5:00 PM this Wednesday, September 17th.
September 18, 2014
Different styles of note-taking. Using notes for maximum effectiveness.
September 18, 2014
In this presentation, Dr. Nieto will discuss her latest book, Finding Joy in Teaching Students of Diverse Backgrounds: Culturally Responsive and Socially Just Practices in U.S. Classrooms. Based on interviews with teachers around the nation, the book explores the values, beliefs, and practices of teachers who are successful with students of diverse backgrounds with implications for teachers, schools, and the preparation of teachers.
September 17, 2014
This talk will explain the concept of Culture and Language Across the Curriculum (CLAC), a method that enables a deeper understanding of world regions while demonstrating the relevance of practical language skills across disciplines (e.g., business, agriculture, family studies, engineering, biomedical science, business administration). Students become better prepared linguistically and culturally for a global market. For example, the University of North Carolina’s program promotes courses such as Business topics in Latin America or Environment and Society, each with an added 50-minute group discussion in a foreign language. In addition, the benefits of using a clear curriculum to learn a foreign language have been proven to be very efficient as it provides meaningful content to learners. Ideas will be offered in order to start a conversation across campus, colleges and departments. Content instructors do not need any knowledge of a foreign language to put this program into place.
September 16, 2014
Different styles of note-taking. Using notes for maximum effectiveness.
September 16, 2014
Merinda McLureIn 2014 the Association of College and Research Libraries is incrementally releasing, and revising through feedback from librarian and higher education stakeholders, a new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. This interactive session will explore the Framework, consider its emphasis on threshold concepts and metaliteracy, and engage participants in discussing and envisioning the application of the Framework in collaborations between course instructors and librarians. Goals and Objectives:
  • Introduce the new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education in its current form.
  • Consider the Framework’s emphasis on threshold concepts and metaliteracy.
  • Engage attendees in envisioning the application of the Framework in collaborations between course instructors and librarians.
Lunch provided by TILT; catered by McAlister's
September 15, 2014
Different styles of note-taking. Using notes for maximum effectiveness.
September 11, 2014
How to prioritize and be productive. Scheduling Tips.
September 11, 2014
Kristina QuynnWe all think we do it…but do we…closely? This session will demonstrate “close reading” techniques (a mainstay of literary criticism) as a useful practice for those who read and teach non-literary texts. Reading closely with students can enhance the quality of instruction and improve student learning in multiple disciplines. It can also help settle us into deeper reading even in our busy day-to-day lives. Participants will do and share close readings to experience the “boost” and power of sustained attention to language and meaning. Because reading closely can be, believe it or not, powerful and super rewarding! Goals and Objectives: To introduce faculty and staff to a mainstay of literary critical practice in a fun and enjoyable way. To encourage faculty and staff to pick and chose from a number of techniques that might work for them (such as noting key words, noting repetitions, making connections to similarly framed ideas within the text) in ways that will enhance their reading and teaching and working lives.
September 9, 2014 - September 25, 2014
Are you planning on attending graduate school, but nervous about taking the GRE? are you unsure of what you need to study to be prepared for the exam? This short course will build your confidence by going over the exam logistics, talking through the different sections of the exam and the format of exam questions in each section, give you the opportunity to complete practice exam questions, and provide additional tips for preparing and studying for the GRE. Much of the course will be spent discussing strategies for answering questions and completing practice questions similar to those on the actual exam.
September 9, 2014
How to prioritize and be productive. Scheduling Tips.
September 8, 2014
How to prioritize and be productive. Scheduling Tips.
September 4, 2014
How to organize yourself and your course materials for the semester.
September 2, 2014
How to organize yourself and your course materials for the semester.
September 2, 2014
Walter Jackson, Program Manager for the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, will give an information session to students, faculty, and staff. The Fulbright US Student Program is the largest student exchange program in the United States. It provides graduating seniors, graduate students, and young professionals opportunities to study, research, and teach in more than 170 countries.
August 28, 2014
How to build good relationships at CSU and take ownership of your education.
August 26, 2014
How to build good relationships at CSU and take ownership of your education.
August 25, 2014
How to build good relationships at CSU and take ownership of your education.
August 14, 2014
In recognition of the important contributions our Graduate Teaching Assistants make to instructional excellence at Colorado State University, the Provost Office, the Graduate School, and the Institute for Learning and Teaching are pleased to sponsor and host an annual Orientation for incoming GTAs.
June 12, 2014
Topics include:
  • Understanding the Academic and Behavioral Foundation of Unconscious Bias
  • Developing a Progressive Diversity Infrastructure
  • Determining the Impact of Unconscious Bias
  • Seeing How Unconscious Bias Influences the Recruiting Process
  • Developing Strategies to Address Unconscious Bias in Faculty/Staff Screening
  • Evaluating Your Campus Climate
  • Instituting Effective Policies and Guidelines to Minimize Unconscious Bias
  • Making Diversity Visible on Campus
  • Activating a Productive Dialogue with Faculty, Staff and Administrators
May 8, 2014
Tips for different exam formats. Making the most of your study time. FREE to all CSU Students. No pre-registration required; however, we do ask that you sign-in on the laptop near the door when you enter.
May 6, 2014
Tips for different exam formats. Making the most of your study time. FREE to all CSU Students. No pre-registration required; however, we do ask that you sign-in on the laptop near the door when you enter.
May 5, 2014
Tips for different exam formats. Making the most of your study time. FREE to all CSU Students. No pre-registration required; however, we do ask that you sign-in on the laptop near the door when you enter.
May 1, 2014
Developing an effective program-level quality assurance plan can help your department attract students, eliminate curriculum redundancies, and identify the strengths and uniqueness of your program.

In this session, participants will learn how to create a solid accreditation plan, develop curriculum maps and become familiar with the new Campus Labs software. Additionally, the best practices for developing clear, specific, and measureable student learning outcomes (SLO’s) as part of the requirements for developing a program-level quality assurance plan will be addressed, you will have a chance to develop or refine SLO’s for your program, and receive feedback from the facilitators.

Audience: Program heads, department chairs, faculty and administrative staff who will be participating in a departmental Quality Assurance Plan or responsible for writing student learning outcomes.
April 30, 2014
Feel like your students glance at the schedule and toss your syllabus straight in the bin? Want them to see it as the useful guide and legal contract we're told it is?

Using rhetorical theory and some example syllabi, we'll consider why a graphic or multimodal syllabus may be an effective choice for encouraging student engagement with this document—and discuss some time-efficient methods for developing these elements.

RSVP: The College of Liberal Arts MTI lunch is a free catered workshop. Note: Capacity is limited (25). Using the registration link below, please register no later than 5:00 pm, Monday, April 28th.
April 29, 2014
Learn what to consider if deciding if graduate school is right for you. FREE to all CSU Students. No pre-registration required; however, we do ask that you sign-in on the laptop near the door when you enter.
April 25, 2014
# Teaching globally demands that faculty embrace a newer definition of knowledge, one in which knowledge does not emerge from singular sources or individual experts, but rather is a process that involves interconnections, plurality, collaboration, and collective engagement.

Classrooms must be envisioned as nodes in a global network, where students, faculty, and the world are in continuous dialogue. In these globalized classrooms, knowledge develops through multiple perspectives, by breaking down borders (whether national, disciplinary, or ideological), and by forging connections and commitments to the world, oneself, and one's community.

This presentation will introduce this collective and critical approach to global teaching and learning.

Lunch provided by TILT. Please register using the link below. Limit 40.

Note: Registration closes at 5 pm on April 23.

April 24, 2014
Understand why you procrastinate, and how to change those habits. FREE to all CSU Students. No pre-registration required; however, we do ask that you sign-in on the laptop near the door when you enter.
April 24, 2014
# For established research faculty who have either participated or are interested in participating in undergraduate research programs.

OURA staff will go over changing requirements for the Honors Undergraduate Research Scholars (HURS) Program and introduce a few other programs and resources that OURA can provide to research faculty and undergraduate students.

Lunch provided by TILT. Please register using the link below. Limit 20.

Note: Registration closes at 5 pm on April 22.

April 23, 2014

If you have been doing research and are looking for the next step, this workshop is for you!

Not just for the research scientist, this workshop is also for those folks involved in art and creative writing. If you have something in the works now or are looking toward the future, JUR will go over the publishing process, step by step.

You’ll get an insider’s perspective on what editors are looking for when they’re approached with a manuscript.

Note: Enrollment is limited to 25.

To Register: Please email the: Office of Research and Artistry. Please place the words "Registration Publishing" in the subject line.

April 22, 2014
Understand why you procrastinate, and how to change those habits.
April 21, 2014
Understand why you procrastinate, and how to change those habits.
April 18, 2014
Please join us as we hear from members of our campus community who have taken steps to reach out to first gen students in their program/college and to brainstorm 1st steps for your department/team to initiate connections that could increase retention and graduation of your students.

As we continue to be more focused on student learning and success as a University, we’re recognizing that first generation status (that is, neither parent having earned a bachelor’s degree) is a critical factor.

Over the last five years, the six-year graduation rates for first generation students have averaged nine percentage points lower than students who are not first generation.

Lunch provided by TILT. Please register using the link below. Limit 40.

Note: Registration closes at 5 pm on April 16.

April 17, 2014
Information-recall strategies. How to enhance your ability to focus.
April 17, 2014
# Dr. Charles L. Rosenfeld, Professor Emeritus at Oregon State University and recognized expert on remote sensing, natural hazards mapping, and applied terrain analysis, will give the keynote address at the 2014 CURC Awards Ceremony.

Over the course of his 35 year career, Dr. Rosenfeld served as Chair of the Commission on Natural Hazards of the International Council of Scientific Unions, headed drought abatement research in the Cape Verde islands during the Sahelian drought in Africa, developed Geographic Information Systems to mitigate flood impacts among the rural poor in Bangladesh, studied the glacial dynamics of a major surge of the Bering Glacier in Alaska, and monitored the eruption of Mount St. Helens and its subsequent impacts on the northwest environment.

His address is titled "Research Perspectives in a Time of Global Change" and will focus on issues of environmental security.

April 16, 2014
# On May 18, 1980, Dr. Charles Rosenfeld, professor of geomorphology at Oregon State University and Captain in the US National Guard, was flying in a National Guard OV-1 Mohawk aircraft en route to do aerial photography of Mt. St. Helens. Shortly before he reached his destination, the mountain erupted.

A mushroom-shaped column rose 80,000 feet in the air and spewed volcanic ash in 11 states. The near-supersonic lateral blast devastated the surrounding area, claimed the lives of 57 individuals, and triggered a massive mudslide that clogged the Columbia River and shut down the city of Portland.

It was the deadliest and most destructive volcanic eruption in United States History.

As one of the scientists who studied Mt. St. Helens both before and after the eruption Dr. Rosenfeld had the opportunity to brief President Carter during his visit to the site. During this lecture, Dr. Rosenfeld will recount his memories of the explosion and its aftermath.

April 16, 2014

Jody Brobst Graduating Soon? Applying to jobs, graduate schools, or professional internships?

If you’ve been doing research for a while and are wondering how to incorporate that experience into a resume or interviews, this is your chance to find out from the experts.

Kara JohnsonJody Brobst and Kara Johnson specifically work with students in the Natural Sciences and Health & Human Sciences to do just that—market themselves.


Note: Enrollment is limited to 25.

To Register: Please email the: Office of Research and Artistry. Place the words "Registration Resume" in the subject line.

April 16, 2014
Developing an effective program-level quality assurance plan can help your department attract students, eliminate curriculum redundancies, and identify the strengths and uniqueness of your program. In this session, participants will learn how to create a solid accreditation plan, develop curriculum maps and become familiar with the new Campus Labs software. Additionally, the best practices for developing clear, specific, and measureable student learning outcomes (SLO’s) as part of the requirements for developing a program-level quality assurance plan will be addressed, you will have a chance to develop or refine SLO’s for your program, and receive feedback from the facilitators. Audience: Program heads, department chairs, faculty and administrative staff who will be participating in a departmental Quality Assurance Plan or responsible for writing student learning outcomes.
April 16, 2014

Several faculty members will share their experiences with the tenure process as persons of color. The conversation will touch on issues related to service, scholarship, collaboration and reports.

This is an opportunity for participants to explore challenges and best practices, and to build community and may lead to further opportunities within a Faculty of Color Interest Group.

Participants will:

  • Hear the experiences of their peers
  • Discuss issues and solutions
  • Begin to build community across departments and colleges
  • Address expectations (of departments, students, other faculty, etc.)
  • Explore ways to navigate systems of academia
  • Identify interests for a developing mentoring program
  • Learn best practices across disciplines (related to tenure)

Lunch provided by TILT. Limit 25.

April 15, 2014
Information-recall strategies. How to enhance your ability to focus.
April 15, 2014

Dr. Lisa Langstraat Ensuring that each class period is overtly relevant and connected to course objectives may be one of the greatest challenges of college-level teaching.

This workshop offers a variety of strategies to address this challenge.

Topics include:

  • information about identifying educational objectives for each class session
  • scaffolding or sequencing activities to build upon student knowledge as the semester progresses
  • developing activities that address multiple learning styles
  • pacing each class session for best learning results
  • developing daily instructional/lesson plans tailored to your students' needs
April 15, 2014
Active learning strategies, pared content, and modules connecting to students’ major are making it an exciting time to take a calculus course for engineers and biologists. We’ll reflect on the success of these methods and the content of calculus courses.

RSVP: To register, please email csn_info@mail.colostate.edu by Friday, April 11, 2014 at 5:00 p.m.
April 14, 2014
Information-recall strategies. How to enhance your ability to focus.
April 12, 2014
Day two of two half-day conferences for current CSU graduate students (first date is Saturday, February 15). Sponsored by The Career Center, The Graduate School, The Institute for Learning and Teaching, and CSU Ventures, this event is a great opportunity for graduate students to think about their professional development by hearing from experts on the job search process (from application materials to interviews) in (1) Academia, (2) Government, (3) Business/Industry, and (4) Entrepreneurism/Small Business. Grad students will choose three of the four areas in which to attend breakout sessions. 8:30-9:00 am Registration, Breakfast, Networking 9:00-9:15 Welcome 9:15-10:00 Breakout session one 10:00-10:15 Snack break 10:15-11:00 Breakout session two 11:00-11:45 Breakout session three Students can attend one or both of the half-day conferences, and should register for each day they would like to attend.
April 11, 2014
# For new research faculty, staff, and advisors interested in learning more and/or participating in undergraduate research programs. OURA staff will review the various undergraduate research programs that exist and provide information on how to get started as a mentor, as well as how to connect students to these opportunities.

Lunch provided by TILT. Please register using the link below. Limit 20.

Note: Registration closes at 5 pm on April 9.

April 10, 2014
How to dissect and think through information on a deeper level.
April 8, 2014
How to dissect and think through information on a deeper level.
April 7, 2014
How to dissect and think through information on a deeper level.
April 3, 2014
How to locate and use CSU's websites for your academic success.
April 3, 2014

Karla Gingerich The second of a two part series, the goal of which is to spend time talking about teaching behaviors that transcend discipline and personal style and those that have been shown to enhance (or detract from) student's experiences and performance.

Come join us as we talk the teacher's out-of-class behavior, from using office hours and email to choosing what to wear to class (and why it's important!).

Lunch will be provided by TILT.

April 3, 2014

Just in time for CURC , Erin Strutz will go over information regarding what needs to be on a research poster, dimensions, and how to accurately portray your project.

Bring your project information and your laptop. You might actually complete your research poster at this workshop.

Note: Enrollment is limited to 25.

To Register: Please email the: Office of Research and Artistry. Please place the words "Registration Poster" in the subject line.

April 2, 2014
Margarita LenkWelcome back to “The Rock” from Spring Break 2014!

Our second Master Teacher Workshop of the semester 2014 featuring our very own Board of Governor’s Undergraduate Teaching Award winner Margarita Lenk who will speak on “Branding Through Learning Outcomes.”

RSVP: As always, the College of Business MTI Workshops are available to all faculty and staff. Please RSVP to Doug Hoffman so that we have an accurate head count for lunch.
April 1, 2014
How to locate and use CSU's websites for your academic success.
March 31, 2014
How to locate and use CSU's websites for your academic success.
March 27, 2014
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated.
March 26, 2014

Scot T AllenSynopsis: Do you lead undergraduate or graduate field experiences abroad? Do you carry out international research in remote regions?

If you do any international educational or research activities and want to learn more about how to assess and reduce risk exposure, this is the seminar for you.

CSU's Offices of International Programs and Risk Management will describe how they can support you in your international activities, with plenty of time for questions and discussion.

March 26, 2014

Several faculty members will share their experiences navigating CSU as people of color. The conversation will touch on issues within the classroom, department and college, including community involvement and service.

This is an opportunity for participants to explore similarities, share stories, and build community.

Participants will:

  • Hear the experiences of their peers
  • Discuss issues and solutions
  • Begin to build community across departments and colleges
  • Address expectations (of departments, students, other faculty, etc.)
  • Explore ways to navigate systems of academia

Lunch provided by TILT. Limit 20.

March 26, 2014
Free Lunch catered by the Corner Bakery; open to the first 25 CSU faculty, staff, and or graduate students who register (See Registration link below).

Marcus will talk about Course Design and Video Games.
March 25, 2014
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated.
March 25, 2014

Just in time for CURC, Erin Strutz will go over information regarding what needs to be on a research poster, dimensions, and how to accurately portray your project.

Bring your project information and your laptop. You might actually complete your research poster at this workshop.

Note: Enrollment is limited to 25.

To Register: Please email the: Office of Research and Artistry. Place the words "Registration Poster" in the subject line.

March 24, 2014
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated.
March 24, 2014 - March 28, 2014
This is an awesome fake event
March 13, 2014
Presented by the CSU ATRC. Learn about apps that help you keep organized, take notes, and stay ahead.
March 12, 2014
Are you a current graduate student looking for ways to help finance your education? If so, this session is for you. Mary Swanson, an Associate Director of TILT’s Office of Undergraduate Research and Artistry (OURA) will discuss how graduate students can identify relevant funding opportunities and prepare competitive applications. She will also discuss some of the non-monetary benefits of applying (and winning!) scholarships. Register today! Lunch will be provided by TILT for this event.
March 11, 2014

Shaun BeatyLead In

This open forum workshop is to share information on basic uses, applications and creative ways to incorporate mobile technology in the classroom and for professional growth.

Debi ColbertCome share ideas and demonstrate applications you are using that support student engagement, participation and learning.

Together, we will construct a list of suggested apps, tips, tricks and tools to manage teaching and learning.

March 10, 2014
Presented by the CSU ATRC. Learn about apps that help you keep organized, take notes, and stay ahead.
March 6, 2014
How to be more present in the moment. How mindfulness can help with stress.
March 6, 2014

Karla GingerichThe first of a two part series, the goal of which is to spend time talking about teaching behaviors that transcend discipline and personal style and those that have been shown to enhance (or detract from) student's experiences and performance.

Come join us as we talk about teacher behaviors in the classroom, such as building rapport, enthusiasm, and enhancing in-class instruction.

Lunch will be provided by TILT.

March 4, 2014

Dr. Lisa LangstraatWorkshop Thesis: Our roles as teachers are becoming increasingly important in the academy, and a Teaching Philosophy is an important document to include in any application for a college or university faculty position.


This Workshop Will:

  1. Overview research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy
  2. Highlight the central information that should be included
  3. Share strategies that ensure an engaging, succinct, and audience-appropriate document.
March 3, 2014
How to be more present in the moment. How mindfulness can help with stress.
February 28, 2014

# Though we have not yet reached the midterm point of spring semester, fall book orders are right around the corner.

Do you have a course you want to revise, whether it's a minor tweak or a major overhaul?

If so, please join us for this interactive workshop on using an inquiry approach to course revision. Please feel free to bring a [draft of a] syllabus for a course you would like to revise.

February 27, 2014
Using what research says are the best ways to learn how to enhance study habits.
February 25, 2014
Using what research says are the best ways to learn how to enhance study habits.
February 25, 2014
Free Catered luncheon. Our speakers will showcase two innovative programs for undergraduate research at CSU – The Mentored Research and Artistry Program, and the Flexible and Extendable Scientific Undergraduate Experience (FEScUE).

RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please send your RSVP to csn@lamar.colostate.edu by Thursday, Feb. 20th.

February 24, 2014 - March 5, 2014
This four-session, interactive short course will serve as an introduction to the creation of web documents using web standards. The course is fast-paced and you will get the most out of it if you attend all four sessions. Registration is limited to the first 18 students who sign up.
February 24, 2014
Using what research says are the best ways to learn how to enhance study habits.
February 20, 2014
How to organize yourself and your course materials for the semester.
February 20, 2014 - March 13, 2014
Are you planning on attending graduate school, but nervous about having to take the GRE? Unsure of what you need to study to be prepared for the exam? This short course will build your confidence by going over the exam logistics, talking through the different sections of the exam and the format of exam questions in each section, give you the opportunity to take practice exam questions, and provide additional tips for preparing and studying for the GRE. Much of the course will be spent on content and questions similar to those on the actual exam.
February 19, 2014

Deb ColbertDeb Colbert

A panel of faculty women from across the University, representing varying backgrounds and identities, will share their experiences: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

The conversation will touch on issues within the classroom, department and college, including the tenure process.

This is an opportunity to explore similarities, share stories, and build community. Lunch will be provided. Limit 20. Participants will:

  1. Hear experiences of peer faculty members
  2. Discuss issues and solutions
  3. Begin building community across departments and colleges
  4. Address expectations (of departments, students, other faculty, etc.)
  5. Explore ways to navigate the systems of academia.
February 18, 2014
How to organize yourself and your course materials for the semester.
February 17, 2014
How to organize yourself and your course materials for the semester.
February 17, 2014
James FolkestadLearning management systems (RamCT), online tutoring systems (PACe), tutoring websites (tutoring.colostate.edu), and learning games (e.g., CYCLES) collect transactional data that can be used to understand student behavior and potentially identify students at risk.

These data trails are expanding at CSU and can be analyzed to understand learning processes and learner behaviors, behaviors that can be used to develop responsive learning interventions.

In this master teaching initiative (MTI) I will discuss ALT Center activities, which include emerging efforts to analyze these data trails (analytics) in an effort to improve learning and teaching.

RSVP: This is a Free Catered luncheon limited to 15 participants. To register, please RSVP Kim Okamoto. We will contact you with lunch options and take your order.

February 15, 2014
Day one of two half-day conferences for current CSU graduate students. Sponsored by The Career Center, The Graduate School, The Institute for Learning and Teaching, and CSU Ventures, this event is a great opportunity for graduate students to think about their professional development by hearing from current faculty about how to maintain balance between work and life, things to think about in terms of attending, presenting, and networking at conferences, as well as a keynote address related to finding meaning in your work.

8:30-9:00 am Registration, Breakfast, Networking
9:00-9:15 Welcome
9:15-10:15 Faculty Panel: Managing the Pressures and Priorities of Graduate School
10:15-10:30 Snack Break
10:30-11:15 Navigating a Professional Conference Successfully (Dr. Ellen Fisher, Chemistry)
11:15-12:00 Keynote address: Finding Balance and Meaning in Your Work (Speaker TBA)

The second half-day conference will be Saturday, April 12 and will focus on the job search, application materials, and interviewing in (1) academia, (2) government, (3) business/industry, and (4) entrepreneurism/small business. Students will have an opportunity to attend break-out sessions on three of the four employment areas. Students can attend one or both of the half-day conferences, and should register for each day they would like to attend.

February 14, 2014
Free Catered luncheon. A group discussion around critical incident vignettes presented by Syracuse University will follow.

RSVP: Please select a lunch item from Panino’s Menu to include with your RSVP to Ken Barbarick no later than 5:00 P.M., Wednesday, February 12th.
February 13, 2014
Presented by CSU Health Network. Strategies to calm yourself before exams and boost your confidence.
February 12, 2014
Every year, government organizations and private foundations award millions of dollars to undergraduates and graduates studying at US institutions. This session will help faculty and students identify relevant funding opportunities and prepare competitive applications. We’ll discuss a number of scholarships and fellowships, the application and nomination process, and the resources available to applicants through the Office of Undergraduate Research and Artistry (OURA). Please join us for this session, lunch will be provided by TILT.
February 10, 2014
Presented by CSU Health Network. Strategies to calm yourself before exams and boost your confidence.
February 6, 2014
Different styles of note-taking. Using notes for maximum effectiveness.
February 5, 2014
Given the unfortunate violence that has occurred on university campuses and other locations, our first workshop promises to be a very informative session!
February 4, 2014
Different styles of note-taking. Using notes for maximum effectiveness.
February 3, 2014
Different styles of note-taking. Using notes for maximum effectiveness.
January 30, 2014
How to prioritize and be productive. Scheduling tips.
January 28, 2014
How to prioritize and be productive. Scheduling tips.
January 27, 2014
How to prioritize and be productive. Scheduling tips.
December 12, 2013
Tips for different exam formats
December 12, 2013
Margit HentschelAre you having trouble finding balance in your life due to work and life stress? Recent clinical research on mindfulness practices has shown benefits that may offer an increased ability to transform stress, improve mental clarity, and help with concentration. This session is designed to explore mindfulness meditation and supportive yoga breath for your daily life. Over the last 20 years, numerous studies have shown these practices to have multiple physical and mental health benefits, which contribute to an overall increase in well-being. The session will begin with an overview of these benefits, offer background on mindfulness and yoga breath practice, and engage participants in “hands-on” practice of these techniques. Audience participate will be invited in a “learning circle” format. A “start where you are” philosophy is embraced and no previous experience is required. Practice sessions will range from 5 -15 minutes, followed with time to share experiences and learn from each other. For those interested in continuing a daily mindfulness practices, we’ll offer tools you can take with you. We look forward to sharing this workshop together with you.
December 10, 2013
Tips for different exam formats
December 9, 2013
Tips for different exam formats
December 5, 2013
Assess where you're at in your courses and how to use study time up until Finals effectively
December 3, 2013
Assess where you're at in your courses and how to use study time up until Finals effectively
December 2, 2013
Assess where you're at in your courses and how to use study time up until Finals effectively
November 21, 2013
- Understand why you procrastinate - How to change your procrastination habits
November 21, 2013
Stop by Johnson Hall anytime between 12pm and 3pm, ask for feedback about your application materials, and use the time to write/revise your essays and short answers. Refreshments and snacks will be provided. Please Note: The more prepared you are for this workshop, the more you are likely to get out of it, so it would be best if you arrived with a solid draft of your application in hand. That said, anyone applying for a 2014 Udall is encouraged to attend this event.
November 20, 2013
How often are you on auto-pilot and not even aware of what you are doing? What percentage of your waking hours are you lost in the future or the past? Is stress getting the best of you? Are you ready to learn about mindfulness? Mindfulness is a practice of cultivating awareness of the mind and body and living in the here and now. Come check out this introductory 90-minute workshop to learn how to begin to restore a balanced sense of health and well-being by applying simple mindfulness principles. Learning Objectives: Briefly define the three pillars of Mindfulness. Recognize the benefits of formal and informal Mindfulness practice. Be able to utilize one meditation exercise to reduce stress. Understand the stress response and the physical and psychological impacts.
November 19, 2013
- Understand why you procrastinate - How to change your procrastination habits
November 19, 2013
Over a quarter of a million veterans are currently enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities, and a quarter million more have applied for GI Bill education benefits. In total, nearly 2 million military personnel who served in Iraq and Afghanistan are eligible for the 2009 Post-9/11 GI Bill. In many ways, CSU is well-situated to respond to the needs of this student population; we have earned a "veteran-friendly" designation and have initiated efforts to identify and reduce barriers to veterans' educational goals, to assist veterans as they transition from active duty to college life, and to provide timely and accurate information about veterans' benefits and services. As we continue to strengthen programs we need to focus our efforts at the pedagogical level. According to a 2010 NASPA report, student-veterans often report a sense of isolation on campus and frustration with traditional students: they express concern about entering into a potentially liberal college culture that may conflate anti-war sentiment with anti-military sentiment, and they can face difficulty finding mentors amongst faculty whose values may differ significantly from their own. Not only are some student-veterans struggling with financial pressures and dealing with physical and mental health disabilities (including the "signature wounds" of TBI and PTSD), they also share the challenges many nontraditional students face, such as childcare, "relearning" study skills and understanding (often unspoken) academic expectations. Only a well-informed faculty can understand and address such challenges to ensure retention and degree-completion. This short course draws from recent research on best practices for working with student-veterans. Dates: November 18, 2013 - November 19, 2013 Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
November 19, 2013
Stop by Johnson Hall anytime between 12pm and 4pm, ask for feedback about your application materials, and use the time to write/revise your essays and short answers. Refreshments and snacks will be provided. Please Note: The more prepared you are for this workshop, the more you are likely to get out of it, so it would be best if you arrived with a solid draft of your application in hand. That said, anyone applying for a 2014 Udall Scholarship is encouraged to attend this event.
November 18, 2013
- Understand why you procrastinate - How to change your procrastination habits
November 18, 2013 - November 19, 2013
Over a quarter of a million veterans are currently enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities, and a quarter million more have applied for GI Bill education benefits. In total, nearly 2 million military personnel who served in Iraq and Afghanistan are eligible for the 2009 Post-9/11 GI Bill. In many ways, CSU is well-situated to respond to the needs of this student population; we have earned a "veteran-friendly" designation and have initiated efforts to identify and reduce barriers to veterans' educational goals, to assist veterans as they transition from active duty to college life, and to provide timely and accurate information about veterans' benefits and services. As we continue to strengthen programs we need to focus our efforts at the pedagogical level. According to a 2010 NASPA report, student-veterans often report a sense of isolation on campus and frustration with traditional students: they express concern about entering into a potentially liberal college culture that may conflate anti-war sentiment with anti-military sentiment, and they can face difficulty finding mentors amongst faculty whose values may differ significantly from their own. Not only are some student-veterans struggling with financial pressures and dealing with physical and mental health disabilities (including the "signature wounds" of TBI and PTSD), they also share the challenges many nontraditional students face, such as childcare, "relearning" study skills and understanding (often unspoken) academic expectations. Only a well-informed faculty can understand and address such challenges to ensure retention and degree-completion. This short course draws from recent research on best practices for working with student-veterans.
November 14, 2013
- Train yourself to be in present moment with more attentiveness, awareness and acceptance - How mindfulness can help you cope with stress and begin to restore a balanced sense of well-being
November 13, 2013
Experiential education meets internationalization of curricula. A Free Catered luncheon at which three WCNR faculty will share their experiences—and lessons learned—designing and teaching international field courses for undergraduates in Belize and Kenya.

RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please email jfattor@mail.colostate.edu by 5 pm, Monday, Nov. 11.
November 12, 2013
Documents that are universally designed ensure access to electronic information for a diverse set of learners, including students with disabilities who use Assistive Technology, English Language Learners, and those with various learning styles. Learn how to create accessible digital materials in this hands-on workshop series. Each session will focus on a different format: Word 2010, PowerPoint 2010, PDF, Web Development, and Multimedia. Space is limited so please register for each session that you would like to attend. October 1: Word 2010 October 15: PowerPoint 2010 October 29: PDF November 12: Web Development
November 11, 2013
- Train yourself to be in present moment with more attentiveness, awareness and acceptance - How mindfulness can help you cope with stress and begin to restore a balanced sense of well-being
November 11, 2013
Paul ThayerAs we become more focused on student learning and success as a University, we’re recognizing that first generation status (that is, neither parent having earned a bachelor’s degree) is a critical factor. Over the last five years, the six-year graduation rates for first generation students have averaged nine percentage points lower than students who are not first generation. Please join us for an interactive lunchtime panel discussion examining ways that we can assist our first generation students as they attempt to maneuver the higher education system. Panel members include: Paul Thayer, Mary Ontiveros, Barb Musslewhite, and Antonette Aragon with additional insights offered by faculty involved in First Generation Faculty Initiative. Lunch will be provided by TILT so please register with Deb Colbert before noon on Friday, November 8th.
November 8, 2013
Stop by Johnson Hall anytime between 9am and 3pm, ask for feedback about your application materials, and use the time to write/revise your essays and short answers. Refreshments and snacks will be provided. Please Note: The more prepared you are for this workshop, the more you are likely to get out of it, so it would be best if you arrived with a solid draft of your application in hand. That said, anyone applying for a 2014 Goldwater or Truman Scholarship is encouraged to attend this event.
November 7, 2013
Techniques to deliver an effective and confident presentation
November 7, 2013
Stop by Johnson Hall anytime between 9am and 3pm, ask for feedback about your application materials, and use the time to write/revise your essays and short answers. Refreshments and snacks will be provided. Please Note: The more prepared you are for this workshop, the more you are likely to get out of it, so it would be best if you arrived with a solid draft of your application in hand. That said, anyone applying for a 2014 Goldwater or Truman Scholarship is encouraged to attend this event.
November 6, 2013
Please consider joining your colleagues for the last Master Teacher Workshop for the Fall 2014 semester! Topics for this Free Catered luncheon and an update on new COB computers and the movement to Windows 8.

RSVP: Please RSVP ahead of time so we may obtain an accurate headcount. As usual, all faculty and staff are invited to attend. As always, Master Teacher Workshops are available to all faculty and staff. Please RSVP so that we have an accurate count for lunch.

RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please email Doug Hoffman

November 5, 2013
Techniques to deliver an effective and confident presentation
November 4, 2013
Techniques to deliver an effective and confident presentation
November 1, 2013
Free Catered luncheon.

RSVP: In order to register for the luncheon, please use the "Register for this Event" link no later than 3:00 P.M., Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013
November 1, 2013
Free Catered luncheon. Jimena Sagàs has become our main point of contact with the Student Diversity Programs and Services and INTO-CSU, already delivering programs for the Black Issues Forum, the Native American STEM Institute, and the Fulbright Pre-Academic Program. This fall brings even more partnerships with National Hispanic Heritage Month, Native American Heritage Month, and the Confucius Institute CSU. Come learn about this important outreach work, participate in the conversation, and learn how you may contribute to Multicultural Library Services.

RSVP: Please Register for Lunch at http://bit.ly/mti-mad-greens by 5 PM, October 30, 2013
October 30, 2013
Colorado State University has a policy for instructors to follow when they suspect academic misconduct. This lunchtime seminar will discuss the basics for following this policy. Lunch will be provided to registered participants.
October 29, 2013
  • Review what you know and don’t know yet about social networks and human dimen-sions of technical problems
  • Learn systematic, structured approach to analyze groups
  • Explore how to apply SNA to resource problems and more
Cost: Absolutely FREE! + earn certificate and points for prizes!! REGISTER and more details at sna.wateractionnetwork.org
October 29, 2013
Documents that are universally designed ensure access to electronic information for a diverse set of learners, including students with disabilities who use Assistive Technology, English Language Learners, and those with various learning styles. Learn how to create accessible digital materials in this hands-on workshop series. Each session will focus on a different format: Word 2010, PowerPoint 2010, PDF, Web Development, and Multimedia. Space is limited so please register for each session that you would like to attend. October 1: Word 2010 October 15: PowerPoint 2010 October 29: PDF November 12: Web Development
October 28, 2013
Current CSU grad students will answer questions about how they made the decision to apply, the application process, and what grad school is like for them.
October 24, 2013
Study strategies that work- learn what the research says about how we learn best and incorporate these strategies into your study
October 24, 2013
Description forthcoming...
October 23, 2013
  • Review what you know and don’t know yet about social networks and human dimen-sions of technical problems
  • Learn systematic, structured approach to analyze groups
  • Explore how to apply SNA to resource problems and more
Cost: Absolutely FREE! + earn certificate and points for prizes!! REGISTER and more details at sna.wateractionnetwork.org
October 22, 2013
Study strategies that work- learn what the research says about how we learn best and incorporate these strategies into your study
October 22, 2013
Colorado State University has a policy for instructors to follow when they suspect academic misconduct. This lunchtime seminar will discuss the basics for following this policy. Lunch will be provided by TILT.
October 21, 2013
Study strategies that work- learn what the research says about how we learn best and incorporate these strategies into your study
October 21, 2013
Significant learning and development occurs when students are enrolled in higher education. This learning occurs both in and out of the classroom. An impressive body of research has been conducted over time to create student learning and development theories that describe, explain and predict how students develop cognitively, psychosocially, morally/ethically, and in terms of their self-understanding related to race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, and spirituality. If you’ve ever wondered why students behave the way they do, come to this session to learn the why behind the what!
October 17, 2013
There will be a free movie and popcorn, and drawing for prizes. Bring the cards received at each Academic Integrity Week session you attended to be entered into the drawings for prizes. The more workshops you attended this week, the more cards you have. The more cards you have, the greater your chance of winning a prize!
October 17, 2013
Using today’s technology and online guides, we will explore ways to make citing your sources as easy as possible. Participants will get hands on practice with exporting citations directly from library databases.
October 17, 2013
How do the topics of research integrity and intellectual property impact graduate students? What do you need to know as you participate in the research process at CSU? Dr. Jodie Redditi Hanzlik, Dean of the Graduate School, will moderate this session. Dr. Kathy Partin, Director of the Research Integrity and Compliance Review Office and Ms. Linda Schutjer, General Counsel will be panel participants.
October 16, 2013
Our roles as teachers are becoming increasingly important in the academy, and a Teaching Philosophy is an important document to include in any application for a college or university faculty position. This workshop will: 1. Overview research on what potential employers are looking for in a Teaching Philosophy 2. Highlight the central information that should be included, and 3. Share strategies that ensure an engaging, succinct, and audience-appropriate document. Please join us for this workshop on creating your teaching philosophy. Seating is limited, so please arrive early.
October 16, 2013
There will be several workshops put on by CSU colleges and departments to inform students of the relationship between academic integrity at college and professionalism in their disciplines. Included will be Animal and Equine Sciences, Design and Merchandising, Communication Studies, Engineering, Health and Exercise Science and CHHS, and Philosophy. Find details and a schedule on our website at: http://tilt.colostate.edu/integrity/integrityWeek2013.cfm
October 15, 2013
If you have never used or are new to using software to manage references for your written work, come learn about a powerful tool named EndNote. It can help you collect and organize in "libraries" reference (citation) data for the books, articles, and other resources that you use in your research. You can readily import/export to EndNote the citation data found in library databases, saving time and effort.
October 15, 2013 - November 12, 2013
Documents that are universally designed ensure access to electronic information for a diverse set of learners, including students with disabilities who use Assistive Technology, English Language Learners, and those with various learning styles. Learn how to create accessible digital materials in this hands-on workshop series. Each session will focus on a different format: Word 2010, PowerPoint 2010, PDF, Web Development, and Multimedia. Space is limited so please register for each session that you would like to attend. October 1: Word 2010 October 15: PowerPoint 2010 October 29: PDF November 12: Web Development
October 15, 2013
Showcasing the academic resources on campus that can assist you in having a successful semester
October 15, 2013
Received a "U" or just want to know how to improve your learning and academic success? Come to U-Turn, an academic success expo where all the academic resources on campus will be in one room! Here's What to Expect: Plan to spend about one hour at U-Turn so that you have time to take your academic assessment, eat some snacks, meet individually with a Navigator, visit 3-5 academic resource booths, create your action plan, and register for some great prizes! Your first stop will be the Concierge Desk in TILT's main foyer, where you'll check in and be provided a brief academic assessment that should take about 5 minutes to complete. After you turn in your assessment, your name will be put on a list for a one-on-one meeting with a Navigator. After reviewing your assessment, your Navigator will direct you to those campus resource booths—set up in the Russell George Great Hall—that you are most likely to find beneficial. Visit these booths! Discuss your specific goals and needs with individuals qualified to help. You will receive tips on academic success, campus resources, and upcoming events that might be useful to you throughout the semester. You may even make appointments for help in the future. In any event, U-Turn will be uniquely suited to YOUR needs, and you'll leave with a plan of action for tackling the rest of your semester!
October 14, 2013
How much do you really know about ethics and copyright? The reality is that 90% of ethical and copyright violations are a result of insufficient information and the failure to ask questions, but the consequences can be huge. This session goes over the basics of copyright and scholarly communication ethics so that you as an author are sure of your rights and responsibilities as a member of the scientific community.
October 14, 2013
Students often stumble into plagiarism in their academic work without fully understanding the expectations at a university such as CSU. Misunderstanding often arises as a result of different levels of preparation from high school or as a result of scholarly traditions of other countries. This session will explain the concepts and resources to help students determine what is considered plagiarism here. Particular guidance will be given for summarizing and paraphrasing without committing academic misconduct
October 14, 2013
- Resources to help you determine what is considered plagiarism here at CSU - Effectively and responsibly summarizing and paraphrasing
October 10, 2013
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated toward academics.
October 10, 2013
Recent clinical research on mindfulness practices has shown benefits that may offer an increased ability to transform stress, improve mental clarity, and help with concentration. This session is designed to explore mindfulness meditation and supportive yoga breath for your daily life both in and out of the classroom. The session will begin with an overview of the multiple physical and mental health benefits, offer background on mindfulness and yoga breath practice, discuss strategies for the classroom, and engage participants in "hands-on" practice of these techniques. Audience participation will be invited in a "learning circle" format. A "start where you are" philosophy is embraced and no previous experience is required. Practice sessions will range from 5-15 minutes, followed with time to share experiences and learn from each other.
October 9, 2013 - October 23, 2013
This blended short course will meet two (2) Wednesdays from 3:30 – 5:00pm, October 9, 2013 and October 23, 2013 with the expectation of online participation in between these sessions. Designing, developing and teaching an online class can be challenging and requires a unique set of skills, even for the most talented and motivated instructors. How do you keep students engaged in an online environment? What is the best way to build an online community? How do you create meaningful and deep online discussions? These questions and more will be answered in this short course. By participating in this short course, you will discover best practices for designing and developing online courses, discuss relevant online learning theories and establish effective online teaching strategies. Understanding each of these components will help you provide a superior learning environment for your students. If you are new to online course design, or simply want to learn different online course techniques, this short course is for you.
October 8, 2013
How to create short and long-term goals to keep you motivated toward academics.
October 8, 2013
Description forthcoming...
October 7, 2013
How to create shirt and long-term goals to keep you motivated toward academics.
October 3, 2013 - October 17, 2013
Historically perceptions of people with disabilities have ranged from the objects of pity to medical anomalies. In the last half of the past century, new ideas emerged that provided a different frame in which to consider the phenomenon of disability – having one is simply part of the human condition. This 3-part short course will explore the shift in perceptions regarding people with disabilities and discuss strategies that may help you to contribute to the shift, in and out of the classroom. Discussion Topics: Oct. 3: The Way We See Things is the Way We Do Not See Things Oct. 10: From Defect and Deviance to Difference and Diversity Oct. 17: From Adaptation to Revolution
October 2, 2013
Embracing your leadership style to become a more effective teacher inside and outside the classroom.
October 2, 2013
Free Catered luncheon. Welcome back to “The Rock” for the Fall 2013 semester. Our first Master Teacher Workshop of the semester will be on Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013. Given the unfortunate violence that has occurred on university campuses and other locations, our first workshop promises to be a very informative session! As always, Master Teacher Workshops are available to all faculty and staff. Please RSVP so that we have an accurate count for lunch.

RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please email Doug Hoffman

October 1, 2013
Strategies to calm yourself before exams so that you can perform more confidently.
October 1, 2013
Documents that are universally designed ensure access to electronic information for a diverse set of learners, including students with disabilities who use Assistive Technology, English Language Learners, and those with various learning styles. Learn how to create accessible digital materials in this hands-on workshop series. Each session will focus on a different format: Word 2010, PowerPoint 2010, PDF, Web Development, and Multimedia. Space is limited so please register for each session that you would like to attend. October 1: Word 2010 October 15: PowerPoint 2010 October 29: PDF November 12: Web Development
October 1, 2013
Craig ChessonHave you witnessed an increase of incivility in your classroom? If so, you are not alone. Because of national discourse regarding safety on college campuses, faculty and staff seem more conscious of disruptive, threatening, and concerning behaviors.

Examples include: use of email, list-serves, or Facebook to verbally attack or slander classmates as well as bullying through intentional isolation of colleagues on team projects.

Reactions to students’ differences can lead to class conflict, impacting a student’s ability to learn and an instructor’s ability to teach. This session will share interesting case studies in classroom conflict.

Whether you are a student or a faculty member, all participants will leave this session with strategies to address difficult situations and promote inclusivity.

RSVP: This is a Free Catered luncheon and is limited to 25 participants. To register, please email Kim Okamoto . We will contact you with lunch options and take your order.

September 30, 2013 - October 9, 2013
This four-session, interactive short course will serve as an introduction to the creation of web documents using web standards. The course is fast-paced and you will get the most out of it if you attend all four sessions. Registration is limited to the first 18 students who sign up.

Topics covered will include:

Standards-based (tableless) layouts

Linked cascading style sheets (CSS)

CSS classes, IDs, properties

Image preparation

Multimedia elements

Course Information

Dates: Mondays & Wednesdays, September 30, October 2, 7, and 9th

Time: 6:00-8:00 p.m.

Location: Will be sent to registrants

Prerequisite: Proficiency with Photoshop. To Register Email: heather.landers@colostate.edu with your name and CSU ID.

Note: Space is limited. Please RSVP.

September 30, 2013
Strategies to calm yourself before exams so that you can perform more confidently.
September 30, 2013
Free Catered luncheon: An open forum on the wide variety of library instruction that happens through the Poudre River Public Library District.

We'll learn about the diverse population they serve, and how their instruction and outreach is adapted to such a wide-ranging clientele. Please mark your calendars and join us.

RSVP: To register—and order a box lunch from Jimmy John’s, please click on the “Register this event” link below by Noon on Thursday, September 26.

Please Note: This workshop is open to the first 25 registrants.

September 26, 2013
Dr. Elaine Green Free Catered luncheon. We will discuss the current Faculty Manual expectations regarding academic integrity and explore the CSU definitions of cheating, plagiarism, and “self-plagiarism”.

RSVP: To register—and order a box lunch from McAllister’s—please click on the “Register this event” link below.

Please Note: This workshop is open to the first 25 registrants.

September 24, 2013
This 4-session course will focus on effective pedagogical strategies for engaging non-native English speakers, drawing on the expertise of CSU faculty who have extensive experience working with international students. It will address issues of cultural, educational and linguistic difference.
September 19, 2013
Learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
September 17, 2013
Learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
September 16, 2013
Learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
September 12, 2013 - September 28, 2013
Are you planning on attending graduate school, but nervous about having to take the GRE? Unsure of what you need to study to be prepared for the exam? This short course will build your confidence by going over the exam logistics, talking through the different sections of the exam and the format of exam questions in each section, give you the opportunity to take practice exam questions, and provide additional tips for preparing and studying for the GRE. Much of the course will be spent on content and questions similar to those on the actual exam.

Topics covered will include:

Overview of the exam format: Taking the new, revised GRE Exam

Overview of the Analytical Writing Measure

•Analyze an Issue

•Analyze an Argument

Overview of the Verbal Reasoning Measure

•Reading Comprehension

•Text Completion

•Sentence Equivalence

Overview of the Quantitative Reasoning Measure

•Math refresher

•Using the calculator

•Quantitative Comparison

•Multiple choice: Select one answer

•Multiple choice: Select more than one answer

•Numeric entry

Dates: Thursday, September 12, 7-8 pm--GRE Overview (Optional session)

Tuesday, September 17, 6-9 pm--Analytical Writing

Thursday, September 19, 6-9 pm--Analytical Writing/Verbal

Saturday, September 21 6, 9 am-12 pm--Verbal

Tuesday, September 24, 6-9 pm--Quantitative

Thursday, September 26, 6-9 pm--Quantitative

Saturday, September 28, 9 am-12 pm--Quantitative

Location: TBA (will be sent to registrants the first week of September)

Cost: $200

September 12, 2013
In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material.
September 10, 2013
In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material.
September 10, 2013
Nationally Competitive Scholarships can help you finance your undergraduate education, study abroad, and attend graduate school. However, putting together a strong application takes time, energy, and commitment. This information session will introduce you to the world of Nationally Competitive Scholarships and help you identify scholarships and fellowship opportunities that fit your career goals. Sophomores and Juniors with GPAs higher than 3.0 are especially encouraged to attend.
September 9, 2013
In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material.
September 5, 2013
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
September 5, 2013
New Opportunities for Technology-Based Mathematica Assessment
September 4, 2013
On Treisman's Emerging Scholars Workshop Implementation at Oregon State University
September 3, 2013
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
August 20, 2013 - December 10, 2013
This 4-session course will focus on effective pedagogical strategies for engaging non-native English speakers, drawing on the expertise of CSU faculty who have extensive experience working with international students. It will address issues of cultural, educational and linguistic difference. Dates: August 20; September 24; November 5; December 10 Time: 4-5:30pm
August 15, 2013
Colorado State University's annual Orientation for New GTAs is a day long event covering the responsibilities and expectations of a graduate teaching assistant.
July 1, 2013
The Boettcher Teachers Program is a dual licensure and master's degree fellowship designed to prepare a highly-skilled workforce of professional educators who make a difference in the individual lives of low-income students and communities in Colorado and the schools that serve them.
June 30, 2013
Phi Kappa Phi gives 140 awards of $500 each towards post-baccalaureate studies or career development. Qualifying activities could include graduate or professional studies, doctoral dissertations, continuing education, career development, travel related to teaching/studies, etc.
May 23, 2013
http://tilt.colostate.edu/conference/registration/
May 22, 2013 - May 23, 2013
http://tilt.colostate.edu/conference/registration/
May 9, 2013
Come get ready before final exams! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
May 7, 2013
Come get ready before final exams! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
May 6, 2013
Come get ready before final exams! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
May 2, 2013
In this workshop, you will come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world.
May 1, 2013
As part of the Ethics track of the PLI curriculum, this workshop will focus on academic integrity for students studying Engineering. We will look at the CSU rules and how they apply to various scenerios presented by those in attendance. Prizes will be given for the best "grey areas" poised by the audience.
April 30, 2013
In this workshop, you will come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world.
April 29, 2013
In this workshop, you will come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world.
April 27, 2013
The Graduate School in Collaboration with the Institute for Learning and Teaching (TILT), and the Career Center, is pleased to present the 2013 Graduate School Professional Series Mini-Conference on Saturday, April 27, 2013 from 9 am to 4 pm. The theme of the conference is "Striking a Balance and Leaping into Your Future." The morning session will focus on managing the pressures and priorities of graduate school including supervision and mentoring others during your graduate career, and how to navigate a professional conference successfully in order to present research effectively, develop an effective network, and prepare to embark on the post graduate school career. Breakfast, refreshments and lunch will be served, and the lunch meal will be accompanied by a keynote talk by Dr. Toni Zimmerman. In the afternoon, sessions will focus on effective job searching, applying and interviewing for careers in academia, the government and the private sector.
April 27, 2013
Save the Frogs Day is a national event that we are making local to Fort Collins. Through CSU's Service Learning Center and the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery we will bring Fort Collins a day of fun, friends, and amphibian awareness. This free event will feature presentations and hands-on classroom activities for kids -- a hopping good time for the whole family!
April 23, 2013
Are you trying to decide if graduate school is the right choice for you? In this workshop, you will learn if a graduate degree is necessary for your field, and if it would make you a better qualified candidate. You will also learn some of the pros and cons of going to graduate school versus first pursuing a career.
April 23, 2013
With assessment shifting from measuring what we’re doing as practitioners to measuring what students are learning, the ability to write effective learning outcomes is critical. During this Free Catered luncheon we will explore the history behind learning outcomes, identify the shift in thinking, and offer tools and resources for developing learning outcomes on a programmatic level. Participants will walk away with a new way of thinking about student services!

RSVP: This session is limited to 18 participants. To register for this luncheon, please RSVP David McKelfresh no later than 3:00 P.M., Friday, April 19th.

April 18, 2013
Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
April 17, 2013
Many faculty carry out informal studies of student learning or success of classroom pedagogies, but how can one take these observations to the next level? In this Free Catered luncheon we will discuss strategies for experimental design, data collection, and ultimately publication of educational research studies.

RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please send your RSVP to csn@lamar.colostate.edu by 3 pm, Friday, April 12.

April 16, 2013
Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
April 16, 2013
In this workshop faculty and other instructors will explore some of the online options (not all good) that students use to "help" with their course work. We'll look at homework help, paper mills, test preparation sites and how to reduce their use.

Lunch Provided - Registration Required - See Links Below

Please Note: To register and order food, you must use both links.

April 15, 2013
Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
April 11, 2013
This colloquium series is designed to support faculty and instructors in developing comprehensive approaches to cultural inclusion in courses and programs of study. Faculty, staff, and students from the College of Applied Human Sciences (CAHS) will facilitate monthly lunch sessions that provide concepts, strategies, and resources on cultural inclusion and assist participants in revising approaches to instruction accordingly. The series will culminate on April 11 in a campus-wide address by Dr. Christine Stanley, Vice President and Associate Provost for Diversity and Professor of Higher Education, Texas A&M University. Dr. Stanley is a native of Jamaica, The West Indies and holds a B.Sc. Degree in Biology (cum laude) from Prairie View A&M University, a M.Sc. Degree in Zoology from Texas A&M University, and a Ph.D. in Curriculum & Instruction from Texas A&M University. She is the 2000-2001 recipient of Texas A&M University's College of Education Development Council's Outstanding New Faculty Award. In 2004 she received the Robert Pierleoni Spirit Award from the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education for her leadership efforts in diversity and faculty professional development. Dr. Stanley's research interests are in faculty professional development, instructional development, multicultural organizational development, and college teaching.
April 11, 2013
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning. It will also cover how to incorporate visual, auditory, and kinesthetic activities into your studying.
April 10, 2013
Please consider joining your colleagues for the last Master Teacher Workshop for the Spring 2013 semester! Topics for this Free Catered luncheon include an update on new computers and the movement to Windows 8 and Office 2013, plus, a presentation by Jennifer Vancil on the professional uses of LinkedIn.

RSVP: Please RSVP Doug Hoffman ahead of time so we may obtain an accurate headcount. As usual, all faculty and staff are invited to attend.

April 9, 2013
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning. It will also cover how to incorporate visual, auditory, and kinesthetic activities into your studying.
April 9, 2013
Details coming soon.
April 9, 2013
Free Catered luncheon.

As an instructor, you work hard to prepare an active classroom. In this workshop participants will learn how to prepare students to invest that same kind of preparation both inside and outside of the classroom. This is a hands-on presentation so please bring your cell phone.

RSVP: In order to register for the luncheon, please click and fill out the Fiona’s Lunch Order Form no later than 3:00 P.M., Monday, April 7th.

NOTE: Maximum attendance has been reached. Registration now closed.
April 8, 2013
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning. It will also cover how to incorporate visual, auditory, and kinesthetic activities into your studying.
April 4, 2013
If you find yourself constantly putting off school work and other tasks to the last minute, causing even more stress and anxiety for you, this is the workshop for you. We will talk about the different causes of habitual procrastination and how you can kick this bad habit.
April 2, 2013
If you find yourself constantly putting off school work and other tasks to the last minute, causing even more stress and anxiety for you, this is the workshop for you. We will talk about the different causes of habitual procrastination and how you can kick this bad habit.
April 1, 2013
Students look to leaders on questions of academic integrity at CSU, or you may observe others doing something for classes that you wonder about. Issues may range from what is considered plagiarism, sharing IClickers, to use of homework help websites and services such as Koofers, Notehall/Chegg, WriteMyPaper, and our own local startup: NiceGrade. What is considered cheating at CSU? In this session, we will take a quick look at how CSU defines cheating in academic work, and then explore situations that may fall into the “grey areas.” Bring questions for what you think is “borderline” in terms of being cheating or not. Prizes will be awarded for the best questions. This workshop is part of the REAL program, but is open to any interested student.
April 1, 2013
If you find yourself constantly putting off school work and other tasks to the last minute, causing even more stress and anxiety for you, this is the workshop for you. We will talk about the different causes of habitual procrastination and how you can kick this bad habit.
April 1, 2013
The Phi Kappa Phi Literacy Grants program provides grants for ongoing or newly initiated literacy projects.
March 28, 2013
If you find yourself with no motivation to complete assignments, it may be time to re-evaluate your priorities and see the big picture. This workshop will help you set goals for college and beyond and will help you understand what factors are leading to low motivation.
March 28, 2013
Free Catered luncheon focused on international education and the INTO CSU partnership. Last year, Colorado State University entered into a long-term agreement with INTO University Partnerships to create an international student center on campus that would provide academic and student services programming to support international student success at Colorado State University.

In this presentation, Bob White and Nancy Berry will describe the programs offered, the students served, and how students move through those programs, especially the Pathway programs. They will also provide pointers on advising international students, in general, and INTO CSU students, in particular. Finally, they will lead a discussion about possible additional Pathways for WCNR and what majors those Pathways might serve.

RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please RSVP to Arren Allegretti Arren Allegretti. Please let her know your preference for lunch (Herbivore, Carnivore, Opportunivore). Space is limited to 20, so RSVP ASAP.
March 27, 2013 - April 13, 2013
Are you planning on attending graduate school, but nervous about having to take the GRE? Unsure of what you need to study to be prepared for the exam? This short course will build your confidence by going over the exam logistics, talking through the different sections of the exam and the format of exam questions in each section, give you the opportunity to take practice exam questions, and provide additional tips for preparing and studying for the GRE. Much of the course will be spent on content and questions similar to those on the actual exam. Registration is limited to 25 students.
March 26, 2013
If you find yourself with no motivation to complete assignments, it may be time to re-evaluate your priorities and see the big picture. This workshop will help you set goals for college and beyond and will help you understand what factors are leading to low motivation.
March 26, 2013
After spring break, John Jurica of Psychology will look at writing and critical thinking as he presents "Unbridled Writing: Using Low Stakes Assignments to Facilitate Critical Thinking?" His presentation will be Tuesday, March 26 at 3 p.m. in BSB 357: For many undergraduate students, writing is seen as stressful, difficult, and even unmanageable. Using low stakes writing assignments, instructors can help students develop a comfort with writing while increasing retention of course concepts and fostering greater understanding of complex ideas. But how can we implement low stakes writing effectively? This presentation will introduce several low stakes writing strategies instructors can employ to encourage critical thinking. These strategies include the weighing of low stakes writing, the frequency of low stakes assignments, and the context and grading of low stakes assignments. Finally, the presentation will address creating different writing prompts to achieve specific pedagogical goals, including development of comfort with writing, encouragement of comprehension, and preparation for high stakes assignments.
March 25, 2013
If you find yourself with no motivation to complete assignments, it may be time to re-evaluate your priorities and see the big picture. This workshop will help you set goals for college and beyond and will help you understand what factors are leading to low motivation.
March 19, 2013
Test 3
March 15, 2013
The Office of Service-Learning recognizes exceptional students, community partners, and instructors committed to service-learning and university-community engagement. This April offers opportunities for individual and group award recognition, as well as exhibition of undergraduate service-learning projects and community-engaged research. The Office of Service-Learning is pleased to accept nominations for: The Exceptional Achievement in Service-Learning Student Award; The Exceptional Achievement in Service-Learning Community Partner Award; and The Instructional Innovation in Service-Learning Award.
March 14, 2013
Staff from the Assistive Technology Resource Center have researched, rated, and consolidated a list of recommended apps for common mobile devices to help college students succeed. These apps will be summarized in the targeted academic areas of reading, writing, note taking, study skills, organization, and time management.
March 13, 2013
Free Catered luncheon. The presenter will describe results from four experiments that examine the benefits of team-based testing. The software is free and open-source.

RSVP: In order to register for the luncheon, please click and fill out the Fiona’s Lunch Order Form no later than 3:00 P.M., Monday, March 11.
March 11, 2013
Staff from the Assistive Technology Resource Center have researched, rated, and consolidated a list of recommended apps for common mobile devices to help college students succeed. These apps will be summarized in the targeted academic areas of reading, writing, note taking, study skills, organization, and time management.
March 7, 2013
Are you struggling to get a handle on your stress? Is stress interfering with your studies? Perhaps you are ready to learn about mindfulness. Mindfulness is a way to train ourselves to be in the present moment with more attentiveness, awareness and acceptance. Learn how mindfulness can help you cope with stress and begin to restore a balanced sense of health and well-being by applying simple mindfulness principles.
March 5, 2013
School – it’s been a central part of your life to date. But have you ever taken a class on “how to learn”? What does the scientific research say about how people learn? Can you use their findings to make for a better learning experience for you?

Beth Simon is the Director of the Center for Teaching Development and tenured faculty in the Computer Science and Engineering Department at the University of California, San Diego. Beth's high school didn't offer calculus or any AP courses. In college, she studied computer science -- she'd never written a program, but there were guys in her course had been programming since they were 13. In her first term in college, she wondered -- I'm working so hard and everyone else acts like it's easy? What's the deal? Maybe I'm not supposed to be in this field? What Beth has learned since about the research of how people learn would have been *really* helpful back then. Don't suffer -- get educated. Come find out how to study smarter -- not necessarily harder.

March 5, 2013
The Gilman International Scholarship Program offers grants for students of limited financial means to pursue academic studies abroad.
March 4, 2013
Are you struggling to get a handle on your stress? Is stress interfering with your studies? Perhaps you are ready to learn about mindfulness. Mindfulness is a way to train ourselves to be in the present moment with more attentiveness, awareness and acceptance. Learn how mindfulness can help you cope with stress and begin to restore a balanced sense of health and well-being by applying simple mindfulness principles.
March 1, 2013
James Madison Fellowships are made to a select group of individuals desiring to become outstanding teachers of the American Constitution.
February 28, 2013
Do you find yourself reading a whole chapter and forgetting what you just read? From textbooks to scholarly articles—this workshop will cover tips and techniques on how to read and how to make the material meaningful so you remember it. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
February 28, 2013
National Institute of Health Undergraduate Scholarship Program (UGSP)- Deadline
February 27, 2013
Fulbright offers Grants for Study, Research, or Teaching Abroad. Each year, approximately 1,500 Americans, traveling to more than 130 countries, receive support fromt the Fulbright U.S. Program. Recipients may pursue graduate or professional study, do advanced research, or teach English on the elementary, secondary, or university level.
February 26, 2013
Do you find yourself reading a whole chapter and forgetting what you just read? From textbooks to scholarly articles—this workshop will cover tips and techniques on how to read and how to make the material meaningful so you remember it. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
February 25, 2013 - March 6, 2013
This four-session, interactive short course will serve as an introduction to the creation of web documents using web standards. The course is fast-paced and you will get the most out of it if you attend all four sessions. Registration is limited to the first 18 students who sign up.

Topics covered will include: •Standards-based (tableless) layouts •Linked cascading style sheets (CSS) •CSS classes, IDs, properties •Image preparation •Multimedia elements Course will run Mon./Wed. Feb. 25-March 6 from 6-8 pm. (Four sessions) Must RSVP by emailing: heather.landers@colostate.edu with your CSU ID.

February 25, 2013
Do you find yourself reading a whole chapter and forgetting what you just read? From textbooks to scholarly articles—this workshop will cover tips and techniques on how to read and how to make the material meaningful so you remember it. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
February 21, 2013
Learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
February 21, 2013
Free Catered luncheon. In this presentation, Dr. Roess will discuss various approaches that encourage small group study by students in large undergraduate courses and an evaluation of whether, in her experience, group exams are effective in promoting learning in that setting.

RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please send your RSVP to cns@lamar.colostate.edu by Monday, Feb. 18th.
February 19, 2013
Learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
February 18, 2013
Please join us to hear Jason Lum present an award-winning seminar on winning scholarships for college and graduate school.

Jason Lum’s background and track record are impressive. Jason graduated from America’s most competitive programs at Harvard, Berkeley, and Washington University in St. Louis. Jason also received rigorous training in leadership and coaching from MIT and Columbia University. He’s also an expert in scholarship and college/graduate school advising, having graduated with honors from UCLA’s program in training professional independent college counselors. He currently also serves as a Core Faculty Member in the School of Public Policy and Administration at Walden University.

Jason won over $250,000 in scholarships, winning virtually every major national award available to college students in the USA. He graduated debt-free.

In addition, Jason also worked in the Harvard Admissions Office and at the Washington University in St. Louis Career Center. Jason has helped hundreds of students in the USA and in foreign countries obtain admission and receive significant scholarships and grants to America’s top universities, including: Harvard, Stanford, Yale, Columbia, Dartmouth, Princeton, Brown, Cornell, University of Pennsylvania, University of Chicago, Duke, Washington University in St. Louis, Williams, MIT, Caltech, UC Berkeley, Northwestern and every single school in the US News and World Report top 25 colleges and universities in the USA.

Having created ScholarEdge over a decade ago, Jason speaks across the USA and has been invited to speak in Asia, South America, and Europe. He routinely visits hundreds of colleges every year and invests thousands of dollars in attending conferences, workshops and institutes regarding admissions and financial aid. His company, ScholarEdge, was voted an “Editor’s Choice” by a major American newspaper, and has been profiled by hundreds of articles over the last ten years.

Jason has spoken to thousands of college students to motivate them to seek ways to graduate debt free. Join us for an informative evening that may just help you make a significant dent into the costs of a college education.

Co-sponsored by Student Financial Services: Division of Enrollment & Access, and TILT Learning Programs.

February 18, 2013
Learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
February 14, 2013
For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
February 12, 2013
For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
February 12, 2013
The basic science of climate change is very simple and has been well understood for 150 years. It's not based on recent temperature trends but on the obvious fact that adding heat to things warms them up. The problem will get much worse until it is solved, and the consequences could become completely unacceptable. From an engineering and an economic perspective, the problem can definitely be solved.

Scott Denning is Monfort Professor of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University, where he leads a large research group using many kinds of observations and models to understand the metabolism of the Earth’s biosphere. He has written over 80 publications in the peer-reviewed climate literature, is a former editor of the Journal of Climate, and served for five years as founding Science Chair of the North American Carbon Program. He takes special delight in engaging hostile audiences on the subject of climate change and has twice been a featured speaker at the Heartland Institute’s annual conference.

The My Favorite Lecture series is designed to give students the oppotunity to learn from and interact with some of CSU's most distinguished faculty.

February 12, 2013
Free Catered luncheon. Antero will discuss how to incorporate games, play, and movement within the [composition].

RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please check out Panino’s Luncheon Menu and email your choice of entrée and drink to Pam no later than 3:00 p.m. Monday, February 11.
February 11, 2013
For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
February 8, 2013
The Rangel Summer Enrichment Program in Washington, D.C. is a six-week program that is designed to provide students with a deeper appreciation of current issues and trends in international affairs, enhance their knowledge and skills to pursue international affairs careers, and expose them to career opportunities in the international arena.
February 8, 2013
The Institute for Responsible Citizenship is an intensive leadership program for African-American male college students that prepares men to be exemplary citizens and leaders.
February 7, 2013
In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material.
February 7, 2013
Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship
February 6, 2013
Free Catered luncheon. This workshop features a demonstration from Via Response—a company that has developed an alternative to classroom clicker technology. Via Response encourages attendees to bring their own devices… “We can have attendees interact live with Via Response from their own devices during the demo. Any laptop, Android or Apple smart phone/tablet will work.”

RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please RSVP
February 5, 2013
In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material.
February 4, 2013
In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material.
February 1, 2013
The Golden Key Graduate Scholar Award provides support for graduate study for students who were actively involved in Golden Key.
January 31, 2013
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
January 31, 2013
The Goldwater Scholarship is awarded to outstanding sophomore and junior students who plan to pursue careers in natural science, mathematics or engineering.
January 31, 2013
The National Security Education Program (NSEP) Boren awards are scholarships to American students for study of world regions critical to U.S. interests (including Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America & the Caribbean, and the Middle East).
January 31, 2013
The goal of DAAD is to support study abroad in Germany and at German universities. Scholarships are available either as part of an organized study abroad program or as part of an individual, student-designed study abroad semester or year.
January 31, 2013
The Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship is awarded to undergraduate sophomores (enrolled in 4 year programs) and juniors (enrolled in 5 year programs) majoring in disciplines related to oceanic and atmospheric science, e.g. biological, social and physical sciences mathematics; engineering; computer and information sciences; and teacher education.
January 31, 2013
The Killam Fellowships Program allows undergraduate students from accredited degree granting colleges and universities to participate in a bi-national residential exchange program between Canada and the United States of America.
January 29, 2013
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
January 29, 2013
The Udall Scholarship was created to honor former congressman Morris K. Udall. The Udall Foundation seeks future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, and economics.
January 28, 2013
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
January 27, 2013 - May 9, 2013
Start your semester off right by attending tutoring or a study group for your courses! Be proactive by working with other students on your coursework in the Tutorial Hall or through a facilitated study group. Programs begin Sunday, January 27, and run Sun.-Thurs. through the Spring semester.
January 24, 2013
De Karman Fellowships are open to students in any discipline, including international students, who are currently enrolled in a university or college located within the United States.
January 10, 2013
The objective of the HIA summer fellowship is to facilitate a collective exploration of the social and political roots of discrimination, as well as to provide a forum where potential solutions can be considered and discussed.
January 9, 2013
Knowles Teaching Fellowship recipients are young men and women who have received a bachelor's or advanced degree in science, engineering or mathematics and are committed to teaching high school science and/or mathematics in U.S. schools.
January 8, 2013
The Department of Energy Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (DOE CSGF) program provides outstanding benefits and opportunities to students pursuing a Ph.D in scientific or engineering disciplines with an emphasis in high-performance computing.
January 7, 2013
The Office of Service-Learning in the Institute for Learning and Teaching (TILT) is pleased to announce the availability of service-learning and/or community-based research Instructional Mini-Grant Awards. These grants, typically ranging from $500 to $1,000, are available to fund the development of new service-learning courses or initiatives, for the improvement of existing ones, and/or for the implementation of community-based research projects. Grants will be awarded to faculty on a competitive basis according to the selection criteria. The deadline for submittal is Monday, January 7, 2013. Please find the application and instructions under "Service-Learning Mini-Grants, "Spring 2013 Call for Proposals - Application Form."
January 7, 2013
The Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship Program funds full-time, six-to-nine month Fellowships in Washington, DC.
January 2, 2013
The NIH and Oxford and Cambridge Universities in Britain have established an exciting international collaborative graduate program in biomedical sciences.
December 31, 2012
The GREF program supports graduate students in collaborative global change research at universities and national laboratories.
December 15, 2012
The International Peace Scholarship Fund, established in 1949, is a program which provides scholarships for selected women from other countries for graduate study in the United States and Canada.
December 14, 2012
The Department of Defense (DoD) offers this scholarship to individuals who demonstrate outstanding ability and special aptitude for a career in scientific and engineering research and product development, express interest in career opportunities at DoD laboratories and, are pursuing a degree in specific science, engineering and mathematics disciplines.
December 12, 2012
Do you find yourself reading a whole chapter and forgetting what you just read? From textbooks to scholarly articles—this workshop will cover tips and techniques on how to read and how to make the material meaningful so you remember it. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
December 12, 2012
If you find yourself with no motivation to complete assignments, it may be time to re-evaluate your priorities and see the big picture. This workshop will help you set goals for college and beyond and will help you understand what factors are leading to low motivation.
December 12, 2012
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning. It will also cover how to incorporate visual, auditory, and kinesthetic activities into your studying.
December 6, 2012
Come get ready before final exams! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
December 4, 2012
Come get ready before final exams! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
December 3, 2012
Come get ready before final exams! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
November 29, 2012
Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
November 28, 2012
Free Catered luncheon. Dr. Yang will present an overview of cultural differences between the U.S. and three major Asian areas: China, India, and the Middle East, and how these differences could influence CSU’s interaction with students from these regions.

RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please respond to at Sam.Gorton@ColoState.edu by November 26th. Please let Sam know whether you are an herbivore, carnivore or opportunivore.

Hope you can join us.

November 28, 2012
In the past few years the CSU Writing Center has been transforming to meet the needs of an increasingly global population of students. Writing Center Director, Tobi Jacobi, and Associate Director, Patricia Lincoln, will share some of the tutoring and outreach strategies the Writing Center has developed and lead a FREE Catered luncheon discussion on future preparations, including outreach initiatives, program development, and staff training.

RSVP: Please Contact Shannon Farrell directly.
November 27, 2012
Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
November 26, 2012
Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
November 15, 2012
A panel of graduate students will answer questions about the application process, the admission process, and what graduate school has been like for them.
November 14, 2012
Free Catered luncheon. In this presentation, Dr. Robinson will discuss how team-based learning can be implemented in large undergraduate science courses.

Team-based learning was developed by Larry Michaelsen and is a form of small group learning that uses inter-team competitions to facilitate intra-team cohesiveness.

This instructional system can be scaled to classrooms of any size.

RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please send your RSVP to csn@lamar.colostate.eduby Monday, November 12
November 12, 2012
Free Catered luncheon. The presenter, recipient of the 2012 College of Liberal Arts John N. Stern Distinguished Professor Award, will share his experiences balancing teaching, research, and service.

RSVP: In order to register for the luncheon, please click and fill out the Mugs Box Lunch Order Form no later than 5:00 P.M., Friday, November 9, 2012.
November 8, 2012
The next Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) Training opportunity will be on Thursday, November 8th (and not on the 6th, as originally scheduled). Remember that HURS Scholars are required to attend one RCR training session at some point during the academic year. If you did not attend the training on October 3rd and cannot attend on November 8th, we will be planning at least two more RCR trainings in the spring semester.
November 8, 2012
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
November 8, 2012
In this presentation, Dr. Robinson will discuss how team-based learning was implemented in a large undergraduate course. Developed by Larry Michaelsen, this instructional system is a form of small group learning that uses inter-team competitions to facilitate intra-team cohesiveness. It can be scaled to classrooms of any size.
November 7, 2012
Free Catered luncheon. This should be entertaining! Please consider joining your fellow colleagues as they attempt to provide ten 5-Minute Teaching Tips!

This should prove to be a fun time! Can a college professor talk for 5 minutes and then get off the stage…only time will tell!!

RSVP: For those planning on attending, please RSVP Doug Hoffman (see email below) so that we may get an accurate head count for lunch.
November 6, 2012
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
November 5, 2012
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
November 1, 2012
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling infomation. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning. It will also cover how to incorporate visual, auditory, and kinesthetic activities into your studying.
October 30, 2012
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling infomation. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning. It will also cover how to incorporate visual, auditory, and kinesthetic activities into your studying.
October 30, 2012
Apple application development training. Seating is limited.

Register Now at: seminar_reg.colostate.edu
October 30, 2012
Free Catered luncheon. TILT Learning Programs offers undergraduate academic skills workshops, course-based tutoring, as well as enrichment experiences such as the “My Favorite Lecture” and the “True Story Dinner” series’ that connect students with faculty and help prepare them for life beyond the University.

This MTI session will be an overview of the services and programs TILT Learning Programs provide undergraduate students as well as some data on program outcomes. There will also be time for a discussion on what else we might do to further academically support and enrich our students.

RSVP: Please contact Shannon Farrell
October 29, 2012
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling infomation. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning. It will also cover how to incorporate visual, auditory, and kinesthetic activities into your studying.
October 29, 2012
Apple application development training. Seating is limited.

Register Now at: seminar_reg.colostate.edu
October 25, 2012
If you find yourself with no motivation, it may be time to re-evaluate your priorities and see the big picture. This workshop will help you set goals for college and beyond and will help you understand what factors are leading to low motivation.
October 23, 2012
If you find yourself with no motivation, it may be time to re-evaluate your priorities and see the big picture. This workshop will help you set goals for college and beyond and will help you understand what factors are leading to low motivation.
October 22, 2012
If you find yourself with no motivation, it may be time to re-evaluate your priorities and see the big picture. This workshop will help you set goals for college and beyond and will help you understand what factors are leading to low motivation.
October 18, 2012
If you have never used or are new to using software to manage references for your written work, come learn the key features of two popular tools, Endnote and Zotero. Picking which one is right for you is the first step in making your life of academic research a little bit easier. Who Should Attend: Students looking for advice on computer software to keep track of sources they are reading while researching material for an academic paper should attend this "hands on" workshop.
October 18, 2012
One of the Undergraduate Program Outcomes in Animal Sciences is professionalism, and the department is committed to graduate students (in both Animal Science and Equine Science) that demonstrate “… personal integrity, responsibility and honesty…”. The American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists (ARPAS) is a professional organization that has a code of ethics in place to “protect the health and safety of the public and to protect the health and safety of animals”. The CSU Student Conduct Code and Honor Pledge are in place to “maintain the integrity of the CSU degree and the knowledge gained”. This session is designed to draw parallels between academic integrity and professional integrity in the Animal and Equine Sciences. Please bring questions about academic and professional integrity.
October 17, 2012
The Udall Scholarship was created to honor former congressman Morris K. Udall. The Udall Foundation seeks future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, and economics.

The Foundation also seeks future Native American and Alaska Native leaders in public and community health care, tribal government, and public policy affecting Native American communities, including land and resource management, economic development, and education.

Learn More › ›
October 17, 2012
Using today's technology and online guides, we will explore ways to make citing your sources as easy as possible. Participants will get hands on practice with exporting citations directly from library databases. Who Should Attend: Students looking for advice on free computer resources to correctly format citations in academic papers should attend this workshop.
October 17, 2012
Free Catered luncheon. Forum topics include:
  • New COB Technology: New laptops, Windows 8, Office 2013 and iTeach Web pages will be covered.
  • New Teaching Approaches: Engaging the Classroom with wePresent
  • Flipping the Classroom
RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please RSVP.
October 17, 2012
Free Catered luncheon. We will focus on understanding issues ranging from: Cross Cultural Learning Styles to Cross Cultural Communication Models to Intercultural Conflict Models.

RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please respond to Sam Gorton by October 15th. Please let Sam know whether you are an herbivore, carnivore or opportunivore.

Hope you can join us.

October 16, 2012
The Udall Scholarship was created to honor former congressman Morris K. Udall. The Udall Foundation seeks future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, and economics.

The Foundation also seeks future Native American and Alaska Native leaders in public and community health care, tribal government, and public policy affecting Native American communities, including land and resource management, economic development, and education.

Learn More › ›
October 16, 2012
Academic dishonesty is not a black or white issue. Many times, what is considered academic dishonesty in one discipline is not considered so in another. In this workshop we will review some cases that are specific to Foreign Languages and discuss why some could be considered "cheating" (but not others) and how to avoid becoming an "accidental plagiarist". Who Should Attend: Anyone taking, teaching, or planning on teaching foreign language courses should attend this workshop.
October 15, 2012
Students often stumble into plagiarism in their academic work without fully understanding the expectations at a university such as CSU. Misunderstanding often arises as a result of different levels of preparation from high school or as a result of scholarly traditions of other countries. This session will explain the concepts and resources to help students determine what is considered plagiarism here. Particular guidance will be given for summarizing and paraphrasing without committing academic misconduct. Who Should Attend: Students who are unsure about when to include a citation in their academic papers. New students and International Students are particularly encouraged to attend.
October 15, 2012
The Udall Scholarship was created to honor former congressman Morris K. Udall. The Udall Foundation seeks future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, and economics.

The Foundation also seeks future Native American and Alaska Native leaders in public and community health care, tribal government, and public policy affecting Native American communities, including land and resource management, economic development, and education.

Learn More › ›
October 15, 2012
Graduate students are invited to bring questions and concerns to be included in the discussion from the various perspectives of the panelists at this workshop. Panelists: Dr. Craig Chesson, Assistant Dean of Students & Director Conflict Resolution and Student Conduct Services; Dr. Donna Cooner, Director of School of Teacher Education and Principal Preparation; Dr. Kathy Partin, Director: Department Research Integrity and Compliance Review Office. Who Should Attend:Graduate students who want to clarify when and how to cite, research issues, and other ethical considerations for their thesis or dissertation.
October 14, 2012 - October 18, 2012
Workshops for students to learn about academic integrity and how to avoid academic misconduct in their academic work at CSU.
October 11, 2012
Do you get nervous and anxious before a test? Do you know the material, but you aren’t able to remember it in tests? In this workshop, we will cover the causes of test anxiety and we will discuss how to prepare yourself before you enter the exam, strategies to calm yourself down during a test, and how to stop negative thoughts.
October 10, 2012
Free Catered luncheon. Each participant is invited to bring a teaching idea to share with colleagues.

RSVP: In order to register for the luncheon, please click and fill out the Mugs Box Lunch Order Form no later than 5:00 P.M., Tuesday, October 9, 2012.
October 9, 2012
Do you get nervous and anxious before a test? Do you know the material, but you aren’t able to remember it in tests? In this workshop, we will cover the causes of test anxiety and we will discuss how to prepare yourself before you enter the exam, strategies to calm yourself down during a test, and how to stop negative thoughts.
October 9, 2012 - October 18, 2012
Beginning Web Layout with HTML/CSS

This four-session, interactive short course will serve as an introduction to the creation of web documents using web standards. The course is fast-paced and you will get the most out of it if you attend all four sessions. Registration is limited to the first 18 students who sign up.

Course runs Tuesdays and Thursdays, October 2-11.

To register, email heather.landers@colostate.edu.

October 8, 2012
Do you get nervous and anxious before a test? Do you know the material, but you aren’t able to remember it in tests? In this workshop, we will cover the causes of test anxiety and we will discuss how to prepare yourself before you enter the exam, strategies to calm yourself down during a test, and how to stop negative thoughts.
October 5, 2012
Free Catered luncheon. Have you witnessed an increase of incivility in your classroom? If so, you are not alone. Because of national discourse regarding safety on college campuses, faculty and staff seem more conscious of disruptive, threatening, and concerning behaviors. Examples include: use of email, list-serves, or Facebook to verbally attack or slander classmates as well as bullying through intentional isolation of colleagues on team projects. Reactions to students’ differences can lead to class conflict, impacting a student’s ability to learn and an instructor’s ability to teach. This session will share interesting case studies in classroom conflict. Whether you are a student or a faculty member, all participants will leave this session with strategies to address difficult situations and promote inclusivity.

RSVP: Session limited to 25 participants. Lunch is provided (We will contact you with lunch options and take your order).
October 4, 2012
The Truman Scholarship recognizes college juniors with exceptional leadership potential who are committed to careers in government, the nonprofit or advocacy sectors, education, or elsewhere in public service.

Learn More › ›
October 4, 2012
In this workshop, you will come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world.
October 3, 2012
The Truman Scholarship recognizes college juniors with exceptional leadership potential who are committed to careers in government, the nonprofit or advocacy sectors, education, or elsewhere in public service.

Learn More › ›
October 3, 2012
Free Catered luncheon. The presentation will discuss the use of retrieval practice to enhance student learning, with a discussion of new data, some suggestions for implementation, and student impressions.

RSVP: To register for the luncheon, please send your RSVP to csn@lamar.colostate.edu by Monday, October 1st.
October 2, 2012
In this workshop, you will come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world.
October 2, 2012
The Truman Scholarship recognizes college juniors with exceptional leadership potential who are committed to careers in government, the nonprofit or advocacy sectors, education, or elsewhere in public service.

Learn More › ›
October 1, 2012
In this workshop, you will come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world.
October 1, 2012 - November 30, 2012
The Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship Program funds full-time, six-to-nine month Fellowships in Washington, DC.
September 27, 2012
Do you find yourself reading a whole chapter and forgetting what you just read? From textbooks to scholarly articles—this workshop will cover tips and techniques on how to read and how to make the material meaningful so you remember it. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
September 25, 2012
Do you find yourself reading a whole chapter and forgetting what you just read? From textbooks to scholarly articles—this workshop will cover tips and techniques on how to read and how to make the material meaningful so you remember it. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
September 25, 2012
Free Catered luncheon. Due to CSU’s contract with INTO, we are expecting a large increase in international students on campus. This session will focus on effective strategies for engaging non-native English speakers in classes. Both cultural and linguistic differences will be addressed.

RSVP: Please contact Shannon Farrell
September 24, 2012
Do you find yourself reading a whole chapter and forgetting what you just read? From textbooks to scholarly articles—this workshop will cover tips and techniques on how to read and how to make the material meaningful so you remember it. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
September 20, 2012
Come get ready before that first big round of tests! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
September 18, 2012
Come get ready before that first big round of tests! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
September 17, 2012
Come get ready before that first big round of tests! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
September 13, 2012 - September 27, 2012
Are you planning on attending graduate school, but aren't sure what to expect in signing up for and taking the GRE? This intensive five-session short course will help you prepare by going over the exam logistics, different sections of the exam, the format of the questions in the various sections of the exam, and tips for preparing and studying for the GRE. Much of the course will be spent on content and questions similar to those on the actual exam. Registration is limited to 25 students.
Dates: Thursday, September 13 from 6:30-8:00 pm
Tuesday/Thursday, September 18-27 from 5:00-10:00 pm
To Register
Pre-registration and payment is required prior to the first session. To register, email Lori Woodruff at lori.woodruff@colostate.edu with your name, email address, and CSU ID. Then, drop off your payment at The Institute for Learning and Teaching (on CSU’s Oval), room 142 by Thursday, September 6. Cash, check, and cashier’s check payments only. Exact change is required.
September 13, 2012
For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
September 11, 2012
For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
September 11, 2012
Dr. Ajay Menon, the Dean of the College of Business, thinks a lot about how to build a “successful” career. Defining your priorities—both in your career and in your life—allow you to develop a personal brand that will lead you to both satisfaction and success. Managing your career according to your personal brand leads the way to opportunities that reflect who you really are. What will you be known for not only in your career, but in your life? What type of reputation do you want to have? What kind of legacy do you want to leave? Reflecting on these questions now will lead you to a career that authentically reflects who you are, and to a life that aligns with your values.
About Dr. Menon:
As Dean of the College of Business at Colorado State University, Ajay Menon provides strategic direction for the College of Business. His responsibilities include: providing leadership for the College of Business; developing and maintaining relationships with all external stakeholders of the College; obtaining financial resources for the College to achieve its vision for success; broad oversight of the senior management of the College.
In addition to his full-time job leading the College of Business, Menon was also named by Gov. John Hickenlooper last year as the state’s first Chief Innovation Officer, leading The Colorado Innovation Network (COIN) to develop an eco-system in Colorado that cultivates entrepreneurial and innovative activities.
Menon holds a Ph.D. in Marketing and has been on the Marketing Department faculty since 1991. His teaching and research expertise lie in the areas of International Marketing, New Product Development & Management and Strategic Market Planning. His research interests focus in the areas of customer loyalty, new product management and strategy implementation. He has coordinated and participated in several discussion roundtables on these and related topics at national and international forums. Menon’s research has appeared in the leading marketing and business journals. In addition, he has received several recognitions for his classroom teaching, including being named “Professor of the Year.” Menon has been a consultant to several leading companies in Colorado.
September 11, 2012
Free Catered luncheon. The presenter will share practices related to teachership, or ways to be a teacher-leader.

RSVP: In order to register for the luncheon, please click and fill out the Mugs Box Lunch Order Form no later than 5:00 P.M., Monday, September 10, 2012.
September 10, 2012
For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
September 6, 2012
In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material.
September 4, 2012
In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material.
September 3, 2012
Students often stumble into plagiarism in their academic work without fully understanding the expectations at a university such as CSU. Misunderstanding often arises as a result of different levels of preparation from high school or as a result of scholarly traditions of other countries. This session will explain the concepts and resources to help students determine what is considered plagiarism here. Particular guidance will be given for summarizing and paraphrasing without committing academic misconduct.
August 30, 2012
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
August 28, 2012
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
August 27, 2012
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
June 13, 2012
Since libraries play a role in students’ development, by interacting with them both in class and one-on-one, librarians and library staff should understand the unique needs of students with disabilities (both physical and cognitive). We will provide information about the varying abilities and needs of these students as well as offer tips for how to best help them learn. We will also discuss best practices in online learning, focusing on how to make the online environment more accessible.
May 17, 2012
The conference will be followed on Thursday, May 17, by a workshop led by Dr. Stephen A. Bernhardt of the University of Delaware. The workshop will provide opportunities for instructors to consider the uses of problem-based and integrative learning to support critical thinking in their courses. Registration for the workshop is free, but enrollment is limited to 40 and participants should be course instructors.
May 16, 2012 - May 17, 2012
The theme of this year's conference, "Using Problem-Based, Integrative Learning to Support Student Engagement and Critical Thinking," calls attention to the value of drawing on interdisciplinary perspectives throughout the learning process. The keynote address will be delivered by Dr. Stephen A. Bernhardt of the University of Delaware. Dr. Bernhardt, an expert in problem-based learning, will define problem-based learning, consider how it engages learners, and explore representative practices. Registration for the conference is free. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. The enrollment limit is 150.
May 3, 2012
Come get ready before final exams! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
May 1, 2012
Come get ready before final exams! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
April 30, 2012
Come get ready before final exams! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
April 27, 2012
Free Catered luncheon workshop. Searching for a new way to present materials and engage your audience? Prezi is a new method for creating and presenting your information. Learn to utilize this web-based application that bridges the gap between the whiteboard and slides. See how you can create a visually captivating presentation which leads your audience on a journey of discovery.

RSVP: Attendance is limited to 25. Pre-registration is required. Please contact David McKelfresh by 5:00 pm, Monday, April 23.
April 26, 2012
Are you trying to decide if graduate school is the right choice for you? In this workshop, you will learn if a graduate degree is necessary for your field, and if it would make you a better qualified candidate. You will also learn some of the pros and cons of going to graduate school versus first pursuing a career.
April 20, 2012
Free Catered luncheon presentation about the new RamCT Blackboard: What you need to know that you’ve put off for the past six months and CANNOT put off anymore whatsoever .

RSVP: Seating is limited to 25. Please email Ken Barbarick by Monday, April 13th

In addition: You must register for the free lunch by clicking and filling out this Mugs Box Lunch Order Form no later than 5:00 P.M., Monday, April 13, 2012.
April 19, 2012
Learn to identify your own “preferred” learning style, making it easier for you to determine study strategies that work best for you. In doing so, you’ll learn to recognize different teaching styles and how to “flex” your own style to ensure your own learning, no matter how a class is taught.
April 18, 2012

Even if you keep up on literature about students today, you may still find yourself asking “Who are these students?” Such a disconnect can lead to some interactions with students feeling quite challenging, even unproductive.

This Free catered luncheon lunch presentation will discuss ways to start conversations with students about difficult topics, creating relationships to foster student engagement in their academics, and provide other tools to aid in such practices.

Demetrios is a student advisor in the Center for Academic and Student Achievement (CASA). He led the development of the PEAK program and specializes in helping students find success when things are not going their way

RSVP: Please respond to Annie.

April 18, 2012
Free Catered luncheon discussion on whether your students are learning or not. How do you know?

RSVP: Please email Kelly Kimple in the College of Natural Sciences main office 2 weeks in advance (April 4).
April 17, 2012
Learn to identify your own “preferred” learning style, making it easier for you to determine study strategies that work best for you. In doing so, you’ll learn to recognize different teaching styles and how to “flex” your own style to ensure your own learning, no matter how a class is taught.
April 17, 2012
Free Catered luncheon discussion on University Course Evaluations

RSVP: In order to register for the luncheon, please click and fill out the Mugs Box Lunch Order Form no later than 5:00 P.M., Friday, April 13, 2012.

April 16, 2012
Learn to identify your own “preferred” learning style, making it easier for you to determine study strategies that work best for you. In doing so, you’ll learn to recognize different teaching styles and how to “flex” your own style to ensure your own learning, no matter how a class is taught.
April 12, 2012
Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
April 11, 2012
Free Catered luncheon. I am excited to announce that Brian Jones of "Little Shop of Physics" fame will be leading our last Master Teacher Workshop for this academic year. Brian was recently awarded the prestigious 2011 Robert A. Millikan Medal for Science Teaching and has been recognized by People Magazine as a "Scientific Role Model."

As many of you know, Brian is a "Master" of active learning approaches. So, if you are looking for techniques to get your students more involved, this is the Master Teacher Workshop for you!

RSVP: If attending, please "accept" this invitation so we may get an accurate count for lunch.
Please contact Doug Hoffman.
April 10, 2012
Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
April 10, 2012
This workshop will feature the first-person experience and perspective of GTA Aude Chesnais, Sociology, whose home of origin is France. Aude’s experience as both an international graduate student and a grader-responder to undergraduate writing at CSU makes her an invaluable resource as we seek to understand the opportunities and challenges of working with increasing numbers of international student writers. What are the priorities for assisting with international student writing? How might we use writing for responsible engagement and development of the international student who is in the U.S. academic setting?

RSVP: Please register in advance at http://writing.colostate.edu/gtpathways/workshops/index.cfm so that we know to expect you!
April 9, 2012
Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
April 6, 2012
This workshop will present strategies for using multimedia in the classroom as an opportunity to engage students and encourage reflective writing. They will discuss techniques for technology integration, as well as the benefits of using multimedia to elicit in-class written responses and to accompany traditional essay prompts.

RSVP: Please register in advance at http://writing.colostate.edu/gtpathways/workshops/index.cfm so that we know to expect you!
April 5, 2012
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning.
April 4, 2012
Free Catered luncheon panel discussion with representatives from all eight CSU colleges: An opportunity to socialize with colleagues over lunch and reflect on exceptional teaching.
  • Wim Bohm: Natural Sciences
  • Pam Coke: Liberal Arts
  • Darrell Fontane: Engineering
  • Matthew Hickey: Applied Human Sciences
  • Dana Hoag: Agricultural Sciences
  • Tom Johnson: Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
  • Margarita Lenk: Business
  • Sara Rathburn: Natural Resources

Lunch will be served at 11:30 and the panel discussion will begin at noon.

April 3, 2012
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning.
April 2, 2012
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning.
March 30, 2012
Drs. Gingerich and Doe will discuss their four-year teaching and research collaboration associated with the gtPathways writing integration. They will share their approaches to developing ongoing assessment practices and inquiry (research) projects. They will share their successes and failures and the differences in their disciplinary perspectives to writing and research. Finally, they will share a Top 10 List of WAC (Writing Across the Curriculum) discoveries they have made over the course of their collegial collaboration.

RSVP: Please register in advance at http://writing.colostate.edu/gtpathways/workshops/index.cfm so that we know to expect you!
March 29, 2012
Midterms not go as well as you planned? Worried about bringing up your grades for the semester? Let's talk about what how you can change up your study strategies to do better in your classes for the rest of the semester. We'll also talk about tracking your grades and figuring out your potential GPA.
March 27, 2012
Midterms not go as well as you planned? Worried about bringing up your grades for the semester? Let's talk about what how you can change up your study strategies to do better in your classes for the rest of the semester. We'll also talk about tracking your grades and figuring out your potential GPA.
March 27, 2012
“The Wisdom of the Sierra Madre: Apaches, Leopold, and the Land Ethic”
Aldo Leopold is considered by many to have been the most influential conservation thinker of the 20th century. Leopold’s legacy spans the disciplines of forestry, wildlife management, conservation biology, sustainable agriculture, restoration ecology, private land management, landscape esthetics, and environmental ethics. Most widely known for his “land ethic” and as the author of A Sand County Almanac, his influence continues to shape contemporary conservation thinking. What life’s experiences were essential for him in developing the land ethic? I will address one of these, the incident that caused him to write, “…that all my life I had seen only sick land whereas Mexico's Sierra Madre was a biota still in perfect aboriginal health.”
Dr. Richard Knight is interested in the nexus of land use and land health in the American West. A professor of wildlife conservation at Colorado State University, he received his graduate degrees from the University of Washington and the University of Wisconsin. While at Wisconsin he was an Aldo Leopold Fellow and conducted his research at Aldo Leopold's farm, living in "The Shack." Before becoming an academic he worked for the Washington Department of Game developing the nongame wildlife program. Presently, he sits on a number of boards including the Colorado Cattlemen’s Agricultural Land Trust, the Quivira Coalition, the Science Board of the Malpai Borderlands Project, the Diablo Trust, the Rancher’s Stewardship Alliance, Resources First Foundation, Tejon Ranch Conservancy Science Advisory Panel, and The Nature Conservancy’s Colorado Council. For 16 years he sat on the Board of Editors for Conservation Biology and is presently on the Board of Editors for Ecological Applications. He was selected by the Ecological Society of America for the first cohort of Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellows which focus on leadership in the scientific community, communicating with the media, and interacting with the business and corporate sectors. He has published over 175 papers and book chapters and has co-authored or co-edited 10 books. In 2007 Colorado State University honored him with the Board of Governors Excellence in Teaching award. He is a three-time recipient of the students’ choice for Outstanding Faculty Member in the Warner College of Natural Resources. He has edited or authored 10 books. In 2008 he was a recipient of the Colorado Book Award for an anthology and, with Courtney White, in 2009 edited Conservation for a New Generation (Island Press).
March 26, 2012
Midterms not go as well as you planned? Worried about bringing up your grades for the semester? Let's talk about what how you can change up your study strategies to do better in your classes for the rest of the semester. We'll also talk about tracking your grades and figuring out your potential GPA.
March 22, 2012
If you find yourself constantly putting off school work and other tasks to the last minute, causing even more stress and anxiety for you, this is the workshop for you. We will talk about the different causes of habitual procrastination and how you can kick this bad habit.
March 22, 2012 - April 19, 2012
This course is designed to teach students the basics of video editing, shooting, graphic design, and distribution. Students will shoot, edit, and produce three short videos during the course, including a final video in their area of interest. Three guest speakers will present during the course with an emphasis on live production, documentary film making, and careers in video. This course takes students from start to finish of video creation with an emphasis on producing professional quality videos. Note: Course will be adapted to student interest Course will run Thursdays, March 22-April 19. RSVP required: please email Heather Landers with your name and CSU ID.
March 20, 2012
If you find yourself constantly putting off school work and other tasks to the last minute, causing even more stress and anxiety for you, this is the workshop for you. We will talk about the different causes of habitual procrastination and how you can kick this bad habit.
March 19, 2012
If you find yourself constantly putting off school work and other tasks to the last minute, causing even more stress and anxiety for you, this is the workshop for you. We will talk about the different causes of habitual procrastination and how you can kick this bad habit.
March 8, 2012
If you are asking yourself, “why the heck am I in college anyway?” it may be time to re-evaluate your priorities and see the big picture. This workshop will help you set goals for college and beyond and will help you understand what factors are leading to low motivation in your classes.
March 6, 2012
If you are asking yourself, “why the heck am I in college anyway?” it may be time to re-evaluate your priorities and see the big picture. This workshop will help you set goals for college and beyond and will help you understand what factors are leading to low motivation in your classes.
March 5, 2012
If you are asking yourself, “why the heck am I in college anyway?” it may be time to re-evaluate your priorities and see the big picture. This workshop will help you set goals for college and beyond and will help you understand what factors are leading to low motivation in your classes.
March 1, 2012
Writing can be used not just for the performance of ideas in final, extended papers, but can also be used to encourage critical thinking. Mike Palmquist, Associate Vice Provost for Learning and Teaching and Professor of English/Rhetoric and Composition, is a researcher/scholar in Writing Across the Curriculum. This workshop will address the often untapped potential of student writing for purposes of critical thinking and deepened student engagement.

RSVP: Please register in advance at http://writing.colostate.edu/gtpathways/workshops/index.cfm so that we know to expect you!
February 29, 2012
Plagued by Test Anxiety? Performance Anxiety? Learn EFT • Butterflies or knots in your stomach? • Sweaty palms? • Difficulty concentrating • Loss of appetite or emotional overeating? • Blanking out • Dizziness • Loss of confidence • Sleeping problems • Difficulty breathing • Negative thinking resulting lower self confidence. Do these issues sound familiar? Learn a fast, effective therapeutic tool that addresses your own particular situation--including performance issues, such as test anxiety. EFT is an age old technique based on acupuncture points BUT with no needles! EFT addresses the physical, cognitive and emotional aspects of the problem. If you really want to conquer test anxiety, this may be your answer.
February 28, 2012
Jonathan Fisk and Morgann Means believe that good writing begins with good thinking and their workshop offers several ideas for getting students thinking about their drafts long before the due date. By engaging students early in processes of invention, research, drafting, and revising, GTAs and faculty can look forward to seeing better final papers and students can learn the advantages of avoiding procrastination, which also helps discourage plagiarism.

RSVP: Please register in advance at http://writing.colostate.edu/gtpathways/workshops/index.cfm so that we know to expect you!
February 24, 2012
Teaching faculty are increasingly using numeric and spatial data sets in their courses. In turn, students need specialized instruction in finding, formatting and analyzing data, and libraries are developing services to address growing needs. We will examine a survey revealing trends for how teaching faculty are using data in their instruction, the nature of the support requested from the library, as well as plans for developing and assessing services that increase students’ data literacy. And finally, we'll provide an overview of progress at Illinois and an outline of where we're hoping to be in the future in providing a wide range of data services.

RSVP: Pre-registration is required due to space limitations. Please contact the Libraries’ MTI Coordinator Merinda McLure
February 23, 2012
From textbooks to scholarly articles—this workshop will cover tips and techniques on how to read and extrapolate critical information. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
February 23, 2012
This workshop provides GTAs and faculty in multiple disciplines with activities to improve student writing of in-class essays. This includes strategies for teaching essay organization, thesis statements, and ways that GTAs and faculty can structure a class session dedicated to preparing for these kinds of exams. Providing students with this instruction and experience in their first few years can give them valuable tools to transfer to all of their academic and future writing.

RSVP: Please register in advance at http://writing.colostate.edu/gtpathways/workshops/index.cfm so that we know to expect you!
February 21, 2012
From textbooks to scholarly articles—this workshop will cover tips and techniques on how to read and extrapolate critical information. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
February 21, 2012
As an administrator in the Intensive English Program, Nancy Berry has a great deal of experience with international student writers, and co-presenter Jenny Levin, a recent graduate of the TESL masters program has been teaching composition to international student cohorts for several years. Together they offer their insights gleaned from many semesters of work with international student writers in order to help faculty and GTAs who may be anticipating new challenges as international student numbers grow.

RSVP: Please register in advance at http://writing.colostate.edu/gtpathways/workshops/index.cfm so that we know to expect you!
February 20, 2012 - February 29, 2012
Beginning Web Layout with HTML/CSS TILT’s short courses for students are non-credit opportunities to learn specific skills in a few sessions. This four-session, interactive short course will serve as an introduction to the creation of web documents using web standards. Topics covered will include: * Standards-based (tableless) layouts * Linked cascading style sheets (CSS) * CSS classes, IDs, properties * Image preparation * Multimedia elements Course runs Mondays and Wednesdays February 20-29.
February 20, 2012
From textbooks to scholarly articles—this workshop will cover tips and techniques on how to read and extrapolate critical information. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
February 16, 2012
For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
February 15, 2012
Michael Steger is an Associate Professor in the Counseling Psychology and Applied Social Psychology programs. His research focuses on questions about what makes people’s lives feel meaningful and purposeful as well as psychological well-being and health. His teaching usually focuses on the other end of the spectrum: abnormal psychology and psychological treatments for mental disorders. This lecture, adapted from his undergraduate course on abnormal psychology, looks at a compelling family of disorders that challenges any lingering ideas we had about the separation of the mind and the body. We will look at the symptoms of Hypochondriasis, Conversion Disorder, Somatization Disorder, and Body Dysmorphic Disorder. We will also take a peek into the confusing world of Munchausen’s Syndrome by Proxy. By the end, Steger hopes to rekindle your fascination with the world of the mind. Or is it the body?
February 15, 2012
Free Catered luncheon discussion on how to enhance lecture effectiveness with intervention activities.

RSVP: Please email Kelly Kimple in the College of Natural Sciences main office 2 weeks in advance (Feb 1).
February 14, 2012
For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
February 14, 2012
Free Catered luncheon discussion on teaching with technology.

RSVP: In order to register for the luncheon, please click and fill out the Mugs Box Lunch Order Form no later than 5:00 P.M., Friday, February 10, 2012.

February 13, 2012
For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
February 13, 2012
Free Catered luncheon workshop. Do you ever wonder why students behave certain ways? Have you noticed differences between first year students and graduating senior students? Did you know there is a vast body of knowledge about how students change when they go to college and how student affairs professionals can impact that change?

Student Development Theory provides a foundation for understanding student behavior and can prove helpful when challenging and supporting students in and out of the classroom. Individuals can spend years studying all of the theories in an in-depth manner, but you can join us for a brief overview of Student Development Theory. A little knowledge will go a long way toward effectively helping students become self-aware, respectful of others, responsible, ethical, purposeful and well-equipped to successfully engage in a global society.

RSVP: Attendance is limited to 25. Pre-registration is required.
February 9, 2012
For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
February 8, 2012
Free Catered luncheon presentation on Blackboard, e-Readers, and tablets.

RSVP: Pre-registration is required.
Please contact Doug Hoffman.
February 7, 2012
For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
February 6, 2012
For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
February 2, 2012
In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material.
February 1, 2012
Free Catered luncheon discussion on innovative approaches to teaching in the college environment.

RSVP: Please email Joanne Greer by 5:00 P.M., Thursday, January 26, 2012, so that she can order the correct number of lunches. Please make note in your response if you require a vegetarian meal and whether you are a graduate student.
January 31, 2012
In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material.
January 30, 2012
In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material.
January 26, 2012
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
January 25, 2012
Free Catered luncheon panel discussion about involving undergraduate students in faculty research projects.

RSVP: To reserve lunch, please email Rod Lucero by January 20, 2012.
January 24, 2012
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
January 23, 2012
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
January 11, 2012
Shape Your World In short sessions spread over a three-day period each January, CSU's Professional Development Institute (PDI) offers faculty members, graduate students, state classified personnel, and administrative professionals the opportunity to explore a wide range of topics designed to enhance their professional growth and personal enrichment.
January 10, 2012
Shape Your World In short sessions spread over a three-day period each January, CSU's Professional Development Institute (PDI) offers faculty members, graduate students, state classified personnel, and administrative professionals the opportunity to explore a wide range of topics designed to enhance their professional growth and personal enrichment.
January 9, 2012
From textbooks to scholarly articles—this workshop will cover tips and techniques on how to read and extrapolate critical information. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
January 9, 2012 - January 11, 2012
Shape Your World In short sessions spread over a three-day period each January, CSU's Professional Development Institute (PDI) offers faculty members, graduate students, state classified personnel, and administrative professionals the opportunity to explore a wide range of topics designed to enhance their professional growth and personal enrichment.
December 15, 2011
The workshop will describe the new requirements for course syllabi at CSU and discuss how the CSU honor pledge can be used to enhance the culture of academic integrity.
December 14, 2011
The workshop will describe the new requirements for course syllabi at CSU and discuss how the CSU honor pledge can be used to enhance the culture of academic integrity.
December 13, 2011
The workshop will describe the new requirements for course syllabi at CSU and discuss how the CSU honor pledge can be used to enhance the culture of academic integrity.
December 8, 2011
For students: come get ready before final exams! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
December 6, 2011
For students: come get ready before final exams! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
December 5, 2011
For students: come get ready before final exams! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
December 2, 2011
Free Catered luncheon discussion on how to engage students when you’re teaching a session in which more than 200 are registered.

RSVP: Seating is limited to 25. Please email Ken Barbarick by Monday, November 28

In Addition: You must register for the free lunch by clicking and filling out this Mugs Box Lunch Order Form no later than 5:00 P.M., Monday, November 28, 2011.
December 1, 2011
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
November 29, 2011
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
November 28, 2011
This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
November 17, 2011
For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
November 16, 2011
Free Catered luncheon discussion on how to engage students when you’re teaching a session in which more than 200 are registered.

RSVP: Please email Ken Barbarick by April 22nd. Seating is limited to 25.
RSVP: Seating is limited to 25. Please email Ken Barbarick by Monday, November 28: In addition, you must register for the free lunch by clicking and filling out this Mugs Box Lunch Order Form no later than 5:00 P.M., Monday, November 28, 2011.

November 16, 2011
Free Catered and luncheon presentation on the power of formative assessments.

RSVP: Please email Kelly Kimple in the College of Natural Sciences main office 2 weeks in advance (Nov 2).
November 15, 2011
For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
November 15, 2011
Free Catered luncheon discussion. Whether you teach first year undergraduate students or not, whether you teach large classes or not, this session will emphasize strategies for providing students with support for being successful in your classes. The presenter will give specific attention to resources and feedback.

RSVP: In order to register for the luncheon, please click and fill out the Mugs Box Lunch Order Form no later than 5:00 P.M., Friday, November 11, 2011.

November 14, 2011
For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
November 10, 2011
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning.
November 10, 2011
The workshop will describe the new requirements for course syllabi at CSU and discuss how the CSU honor pledge can be used to enhance the culture of academic integrity.
November 9, 2011
Recent fossil evidence indicates early Hominids were bipedal locomotors; with a relatively small brain about one half the size of modern humans. Could it be that bipedal locomotion was the driving force behind future evolutionary events including cerebral enlargement? In this lecture we will explore the fossil evidence for bipedal locomotion, anatomical features in bones and muscles that allow bipedal locomotion and the development of the neocortex.
November 9, 2011
Free Catered luncheon.

RSVP: Pre-registration is required.
Please contact Doug Hoffman.
November 9, 2011
Free Catered luncheon workshop. Participants will leave this workshop with ideas for creating teaching sessions that speak to a variety of learners and that push learners beyond basic knowledge acquisition.

This session will build on the October Learning Theory & The Teacher workshop, however new participants will also find this workshop engaging and informative!

Whether you are new to or steeped in learning theory, please feel welcome to join us! A companion workshop, will be held November 9.

RSVP: Attendance is limited to 25. Pre-registration is required.
November 8, 2011
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning.
November 7, 2011
"Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning.
November 3, 2011
Midterms not go as well as you planned? Worried about bringing up your grades for the semester? Let's talk about what how you can change up your study strategies to do better in your classes for the rest of the semester. We'll also talk about tracking your grades and figuring out your potential GPA.
November 1, 2011
Midterms not go as well as you planned? Worried about bringing up your grades for the semester? Let's talk about what how you can change up your study strategies to do better in your classes for the rest of the semester. We'll also talk about tracking your grades and figuring out your potential GPA.
November 1, 2011
What does being a critical thinker have to do with success in college, and beyond? In this four-week introduction to critical thinking, you will explore with a group of other students what your professors mean when they ask you to think critically. You'll meet with a small cohort of students once a week for four weeks (Tuesdays, 10/11-11/1), and discuss what it means to move from being a consumer of information to a producer of knowledge. You will also come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world. What happens during these workshops? Each Session is comprised of four discussion-based workshops on the following topics: •Workshop 1: Critical Thinking, Academic Success, and ACTing in the World •Workshop 2: Learning How to Learn •Workshop 3: Skilled Analysis and Effective Evaluation •Workshop 4: Finding Your Voice and ACTing up. At the end of the four workshops, you will receive a Certificate from TILT's Academy for Critical Thinking. Pre-registration required. To register, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
October 31, 2011
Midterms not go as well as you planned? Worried about bringing up your grades for the semester? Let's talk about what how you can change up your study strategies to do better in your classes for the rest of the semester. We'll also talk about tracking your grades and figuring out your potential GPA.
October 27, 2011
Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
October 25, 2011
Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
October 25, 2011
What does being a critical thinker have to do with success in college, and beyond? In this four-week introduction to critical thinking, you will explore with a group of other students what your professors mean when they ask you to think critically. You'll meet with a small cohort of students once a week for four weeks (Tuesdays, 10/11-11/1), and discuss what it means to move from being a consumer of information to a producer of knowledge. You will also come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world. What happens during these workshops? Each Session is comprised of four discussion-based workshops on the following topics: •Workshop 1: Critical Thinking, Academic Success, and ACTing in the World •Workshop 2: Learning How to Learn •Workshop 3: Skilled Analysis and Effective Evaluation •Workshop 4: Finding Your Voice and ACTing up. At the end of the four workshops, you will receive a Certificate from TILT's Academy for Critical Thinking. Pre-registration required. To register, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
October 24, 2011
What does being a critical thinker have to do with success in college, and beyond? In this four-week introduction to critical thinking, you will explore with a group of other students what your professors mean when they ask you to think critically. You'll meet with a small cohort of students once a week for four weeks (Mondays, 10/10-10/31), and discuss what it means to move from being a consumer of information to a producer of knowledge. You will also come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world. What happens during these workshops? Each Session is comprised of four discussion-based workshops on the following topics: •Workshop 1: Critical Thinking, Academic Success, and ACTing in the World •Workshop 2: Learning How to Learn •Workshop 3: Skilled Analysis and Effective Evaluation •Workshop 4: Finding Your Voice and ACTing up. At the end of the four workshops, you will receive a Certificate from TILT's Academy for Critical Thinking. Pre-registration required. To register, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
October 24, 2011
Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
October 21, 2011

You must RSVP for this luncheon. We will be handling RSVPs a little differently this month. First, contact Pam Coke to let her know you would like to attend.

Once your place is confirmed, instead of contacting the amazing Shirley Guitron for lunch orders, you can register by ordering your lunch directly from MUGS.

Place your order by Friday, October 14th. Let Pam know if you have any questions.

October 21, 2011
Detailed Description: Free Catered and luncheon presentation on the power of formative assessments.

RSVP: Please email Kelly Kimple in the College of Natural Sciences main office 2 weeks in advance (Nov 2).
October 20, 2011
Learn to identify your own “preferred” learning style, making it easier for you to determine study strategies that work best for you. In doing so, you’ll learn to recognize different teaching styles and how to “flex” your own preferences to ensure your own learning, no matter how a class is taught.
October 20, 2011
Professor Cowell will address how everyday stories, small stories inflected by local pasts and presents, have the power to sustain communities in a messy and unpredictable world. The stories Cowell is interested in are common, in both senses of the word: they are shared, a common ground, and they are the stuff of ordinary life, commonplace. They function as connective tissue, performing a local knowledge that allows individuals to place themselves in relation to others who share that knowledge. They become public tools for communities to renew themselves. But how do small stories accomplish such significant cultural work? How do people actually use them? These are the questions we’ll explore together in Pattie Cowell’s My Favorite Lecture.
October 20, 2011
In the 2011 fall address, President Frank highlighted our focus on achieving student success. He said, “We have the raw materials we need to be successful - qualified students, committed educators" he went on to say…"And there is no aspect of our mission that is more important than this one: We exist to educate and graduate our students.” New initiatives and programs across campus have focused student success and research suggests that faculty student interaction, good advising and experiential learning are strong correlates of success. WCNR is in a unique position to excel in areas normally used to gauge student success, (persistence, retention and graduation rates), as the culture of our faculty, students and experienced-based curriculum naturally manifest activities that yield high student engagement. There are several important questions: What is the definition of student success? What metrics will tell us if we are on track or off track? How will our recent enrollment growth affect the very attributes that make us successful? Join us next Thursday (10/20) at 11:50 am in the Dean’s Conference room for a lunch and discussion about student success. Hear results from recent WCNR study conducted by WCNR faculty (Jerry Vaske and others), grad students (Kaye Holman and others) and staff (Ethan Billigsley) about student engagement and student success and grapple with the above questions. As always, please let Annie Bilyeu know your preference, Carnivore, Vegetarian or Opportunivore… Please RSVP by Weds October 19 at noon, space is limited!
October 19, 2011
Free Catered luncheon workshop in which we will explore how different learners access and retain new information. The work of learning theorists such as Bloom, Gardner, Krathwohl, and Simpson will be introduced.

Whether you are new to or steeped in learning theory, please feel welcome to join us! A companion workshop, Learning Theory & The Teacher will be held November 9.

RSVP: Attendance is limited to 25. Pre-registration is required.

Please contact Merinda McLure.
October 18, 2011
Learn to identify your own “preferred” learning style, making it easier for you to determine study strategies that work best for you. In doing so, you’ll learn to recognize different teaching styles and how to “flex” your own preferences to ensure your own learning, no matter how a class is taught.
October 18, 2011
What does being a critical thinker have to do with success in college, and beyond? In this four-week introduction to critical thinking, you will explore with a group of other students what your professors mean when they ask you to think critically. You'll meet with a small cohort of students once a week for four weeks (Tuesdays, 10/11-11/1), and discuss what it means to move from being a consumer of information to a producer of knowledge. You will also come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world. What happens during these workshops? Each Session is comprised of four discussion-based workshops on the following topics: •Workshop 1: Critical Thinking, Academic Success, and ACTing in the World •Workshop 2: Learning How to Learn •Workshop 3: Skilled Analysis and Effective Evaluation •Workshop 4: Finding Your Voice and ACTing up. At the end of the four workshops, you will receive a Certificate from TILT's Academy for Critical Thinking. Pre-registration required. To register, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
October 18, 2011
This session will present information on what is meant by critical thinking and why it is important. Also, examples of how to include it in our teaching and assignments will be presented. This should be an interactive session, so be prepared to share! Lunch is provided. This session is limited to 25 participants. RSVP to David.mckelfresh@colostate.edu For more information about the MTI initiative and TILT, check out this link: http://tilt.colostate.edu/mti/
October 17, 2011
What does being a critical thinker have to do with success in college, and beyond? In this four-week introduction to critical thinking, you will explore with a group of other students what your professors mean when they ask you to think critically. You'll meet with a small cohort of students once a week for four weeks (Mondays, 10/10-10/31), and discuss what it means to move from being a consumer of information to a producer of knowledge. You will also come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world. What happens during these workshops? Each Session is comprised of four discussion-based workshops on the following topics: •Workshop 1: Critical Thinking, Academic Success, and ACTing in the World •Workshop 2: Learning How to Learn •Workshop 3: Skilled Analysis and Effective Evaluation •Workshop 4: Finding Your Voice and ACTing up. At the end of the four workshops, you will receive a Certificate from TILT's Academy for Critical Thinking. Pre-registration required. To register, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
October 17, 2011
Learn to identify your own “preferred” learning style, making it easier for you to determine study strategies that work best for you. In doing so, you’ll learn to recognize different teaching styles and how to “flex” your own preferences to ensure your own learning, no matter how a class is taught.
October 13, 2011
Beginning Web Layout with HTML/CSS-- TILT’s short courses for students are non-credit opportunities to learn specific skills in a few sessions. This interactive short course (4 sessions) will serve as an introduction to the creation of web documents using web standards. Topics covered will include: * Standards-based (tableless) layouts * Linked cascading style sheets (CSS) * CSS classes, IDs, properties * Image preparation * Multimedia elements Requirements: Basic proficiency with Photoshop. To register, email Heather Landers (heather.landers@colostate.edu) with your name, email address, and CSU ID. Space is limited; register early.
October 11, 2011
Beginning Web Layout with HTML/CSS-- TILT’s short courses for students are non-credit opportunities to learn specific skills in a few sessions. This interactive short course (4 sessions) will serve as an introduction to the creation of web documents using web standards. Topics covered will include: * Standards-based (tableless) layouts * Linked cascading style sheets (CSS) * CSS classes, IDs, properties * Image preparation * Multimedia elements Requirements: Basic proficiency with Photoshop. To register, email Heather Landers (heather.landers@colostate.edu) with your name, email address, and CSU ID. Space is limited; register early.
October 11, 2011
What does being a critical thinker have to do with success in college, and beyond? In this four-week introduction to critical thinking, you will explore with a group of other students what your professors mean when they ask you to think critically. You'll meet with a small cohort of students once a week for four weeks (Tuesdays, 10/11-11/1), and discuss what it means to move from being a consumer of information to a producer of knowledge. You will also come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world. What happens during these workshops? Each Session is comprised of four discussion-based workshops on the following topics: •Workshop 1: Critical Thinking, Academic Success, and ACTing in the World •Workshop 2: Learning How to Learn •Workshop 3: Skilled Analysis and Effective Evaluation •Workshop 4: Finding Your Voice and ACTing up. At the end of the four workshops, you will receive a Certificate from TILT's Academy for Critical Thinking. Pre-registration required. To register, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
October 10, 2011
What does being a critical thinker have to do with success in college, and beyond? In this four-week introduction to critical thinking, you will explore with a group of other students what your professors mean when they ask you to think critically. You'll meet with a small cohort of students once a week for four weeks (Mondays, 10/10-10/31), and discuss what it means to move from being a consumer of information to a producer of knowledge. You will also come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world. What happens during these workshops? Each Session is comprised of four discussion-based workshops on the following topics: •Workshop 1: Critical Thinking, Academic Success, and ACTing in the World •Workshop 2: Learning How to Learn •Workshop 3: Skilled Analysis and Effective Evaluation •Workshop 4: Finding Your Voice and ACTing up. At the end of the four workshops, you will receive a Certificate from TILT's Academy for Critical Thinking. Pre-registration required. To register, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
October 10, 2011
Plagued by Test Anxiety? Performance Anxiety? Some signs include: • Butterflies or knots in your stomach? • Sweaty palms? • Difficulty concentrating • Loss of appetite or emotional overeating? • Blanking out • Dizziness • Loss of confidence • Sleeping problems • Difficulty breathing • Negative thinking resulting in lower self confidence Do these issues sound familiar? Learn a fast, effective therapeutic tool that addresses your own particular situation--including performance issues, such as test anxiety. EFT is an age old technique based on acupuncture points BUT with no needles! EFT addresses the physical, cognitive and emotional aspects of the problem. If you really want to conquer test anxiety, this may be your answer.
October 6, 2011
Beginning Web Layout with HTML/CSS-- TILT’s short courses for students are non-credit opportunities to learn specific skills in a few sessions. This interactive short course(4 sessions) will serve as an introduction to the creation of web documents using web standards. Topics covered will include: * Standards-based (tableless) layouts * Linked cascading style sheets (CSS) * CSS classes, IDs, properties * Image preparation * Multimedia elements Requirements: Basic proficiency with Photoshop. To register, email Heather Landers (heather.landers@colostate.edu) with your name, email address, and CSU ID. Space is limited; register early.
October 6, 2011
For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests - midterms! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
October 5, 2011
Free Catered luncheon. This workshop-focus is on bringing the student's world into the classroom to facilitate learning through music and movies.

RSVP: Pre-registration is required.
Please contact Doug Hoffman.
October 5, 2011
Drs. Taylor and Suchman will present a new course design technique learned at this year's HHMI summer teaching workshop in Boulder. They will be describing Scientific Teaching and using Backward Design to achieve this. If you plan on attending, please RSVP to Joanne Greer, from the Dean's Office, so that we can order the correct number of lunches. Also please let her know if you need a vegetarian lunch and if you are a graduate student. joanne.greer@colostate.edu
October 4, 2011
For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests - midterms! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
October 4, 2011
Beginning Web Layout with HTML/CSS-- TILT’s short courses for students are non-credit opportunities to learn specific skills in a few sessions. This interactive short course (4 sessions) will serve as an introduction to the creation of web documents using web standards. Topics covered will include: * Standards-based (tableless) layouts * Linked cascading style sheets (CSS) * CSS classes, IDs, properties * Image preparation * Multimedia elements Requirements: Basic proficiency with Photoshop. To register, email Heather Landers (heather.landers@colostate.edu) with your name, email address, and CSU ID. Space is limited; register early.
October 3, 2011
For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests - midterms! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
September 30, 2011
Lunch provided.Seating is limited to 25. Please RSVP to Ken Barbarick by 23 September 2011
September 29, 2011
Using today’s technology and online guides, we will explore ways to make citing your sources as easy as possible. Participants will get hands on practice with exporting citations directly from library databases, as well as learn the basics of using Endnote and Zotero.
September 29, 2011
The workshop will address integrity in the study and practice of engineering; giving students helpful perspectives to promoting their success as a professional.
September 29, 2011
This workshop will address issues faced by graduate students, providing information to help avoid problems.
September 28, 2011
Using today’s technology and online guides, we will explore ways to make citing your sources as easy as possible. Participants will get hands on practice with exporting citations directly from library databases, as well as learn the basics of using Endnote and Zotero.
September 28, 2011
Attendance is limited to 30 attendees. Pre-registration is required. Please contact Merinda McLure.
September 27, 2011
This workshop will address what constitutes plagiarism, including how to avoid unintentional plagiarism.
September 27, 2011
Academic Dishonesty is not a black or white issue. Many times, what is considered academic dishonesty in one discipline is not considered so in another. In this workshop we will review some cases that are specific to Foreign Languages and discuss why some could be considered "cheating" (but not others) and how to avoid becoming an "accidental plagiarist".
September 27, 2011
The workshop will explore issues Business majors and others should think about in terms of their own ethical practices.
September 26, 2011 - September 29, 2011
  • “Are You Cheating Your Way Through College?; Understanding the Gray Areas” .
    • Through anonymous questions, students will be able to ask a panel of students and faculty how they decide if something is considered cheating. Prizes will be awarded for the hardest of questions, so students are encouraged to bring situations to “stump the panel.”
    • 4:30 – 6:00, Monday, Sept. 26
    • TILT 221
    • Panelists will include Dr. Mike Palmquist, Associate Vice Provost and Director of TILT, Dr. Dawn Rickey, and Becky Ewing, Chemistry student and ASCSU Director of Academics.
    • Provost, Dr. Rick Miranda will offer opening remarks. Moderated by Melissa Emerson, Assistant Director of CRSCS
    • Academic Integrity in Engineering .
      • Thursday, September 29, 4:30-6:00 TILT Room 221
      • Dr. Tom Sanders, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering
    • Academic integrity for graduate students:The Graduate Student's Role in Maintaining Academic Integrity.
      • Dr. Jodie Hanzlik, Interim Vice Provost of Graduate Affairs
      • Dr. Craig Chesson, Director of the office of Conflict Resolution and Student Conduct Services and Assistant Dean of Students
    • Thursday, Sept 29 12:00, LSC Room 213/215
    • Defining and Avoiding Academic Dishonesty in Foreign Language Classes
      • Dr. Maite Correa, Assistant Professor, Foreign Languages and Literatures
      • 3:30 – 4:30 Tuesday, September 27. LSC Room 213/215
      • Academic Dishonesty is not a black or white issue. Many times, what is considered academic dishonesty in one discipline is not considered so in another. In this workshop we will review some cases that are specific to Foreign Languages and discuss why some could be considered "cheating" (but not others) and how to avoid becoming an "accidental plagiarist".
    • “Is “Business Ethics” an Oxymoron?” Academic integrity in business
      • 12:30 - 1:45, Tuesday Sept. 27, 116 West Rockwell Hall
      • Mary Beth Lewis, Director, Daniels Fund Ethics Initiative.
    • Avoiding Unintentional Plagiarism
      • Dr. Carrie Lamanna, Director of the CSU Writing Center
    • Tuesday, September 27, 4:30, TILT Room 221
    • Tools and Tips for Formatting Citations with Ease
      • Library Associate Professor Cathy Cranston will demonstrate how to use technology and online guides to make citing sources as easy as possible.
      • 4:30-6:00 on both Wednesday, September 28, and Thursday, September 29 in the Library’s Computer Classroom 2. (limited to the first 30)
    September 26, 2011 - September 29, 2011
    The participatory workshop will address various issues about student academic integrity, responding to the audience's ananomous questions "Is this considered cheating at CSU?" Prizes will be awarded. Panelists will include Dr. Mike Palmquist, Associate Vice Provost and Director of TILT, Dr. Dawn Rickey and Becky Ewing, Chemistry student and ASCSU Director of Academics.
    September 22, 2011
    Are you overwhelmed by the amount of reading you must do for your social science courses (think: communication, business, sociology, anthropology, education, economics) ? Do you feel like you read your textbook over and over but are messing the key points? This workshop will provide tips and techniques on how to read and extrapolate critical information, focusing on reading in the social sciences. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
    September 22, 2011
    Please join us for lunch and a panel discussion. Space is limited! Please RSVP to: Annie Bilyeu, Annie.Bilyeu@colostate.edu and let her know your preference (vegetarian/carnivore/opportunivore)
    September 22, 2011
    Have you witnessed an increase of incivility in your classroom? If so, you are not alone. Because of national discourse regarding safety on college campuses, faculty and staff seem more conscious of disruptive, threatening, and concerning behaviors. Examples include: use of email, list-serves, or Facebook to verbally attack or slander classmates as well as bullying through the intentional isolation of colleagues on team projects. Reactions to students’ differences can lead to class conflict, impacting a student’s ability to learn and an instructor’s ability to teach. Join the staff of Conflict Resolution & Student Conduct Services as they share some interesting case studies where one’s age, ability, veteran status, and religion played a role in classroom conflict. Whether you are a student or a faculty member, all participants will leave this session with strategies to address difficult situations and promote inclusivity. This session is part of the CSU Diversity Symposium.
    September 21, 2011
    As a football coach for the CSU Rams, Sonny Lubick was known for coaching his players not only on the field, but in their lives as well. In his coaching career, he worked with many student athletes who faced significant challenges. In his “favorite lecture,” Lubick will share some of his tried and true tips for overcoming adversity. All students will face a time in their academic careers (and in their lives) when it seems like quitting is the most logical thing to do. Lubick, however, believes that we all have the resilience to bounce back from even the most difficult circumstances. The most successful people in the world aren’t necessarily the luckiest, but rather the ones who are able to navigate obstacles. Lubick will give students tips on how to “coach” themselves into getting past the inevitable setbacks in life. No matter what your future career path, the way you handle stumbling blocks often speaks more about your character than your successes.
    Sonny Lubick was head coach for the Colorado State Rams football team from 1993-2007 and led the team to six conference titles and nine bowl appearances; he was named National Coach of the Year by Sports Illustrated in 1994. Colorado State’s football stadium is named Sonny Lubick Field at Hughes Stadium, a testament to his coaching career with the Rams. A well-known figure in the Colorado State and Fort Collins community, Lubick now serves the Director of Community Leadership Outreach at the CSU College of Business.
    About the 'My Favorite Lecture" series
    TILT's Learning Programs present five or six “My Favorite Lectures” each academic year, providing an opportunity for CSU students—who might not otherwise have the chance—to experience some of the University’s most distinguished professors speaking on topics of interest that lay outside of students' immediate coursework and or disciplinary paths.
    September 20, 2011
    Are you overwhelmed by the amount of reading you must do for your science courses? Do you feel like you read your textbook over and over but are missing the key points? This workshop will provide tips and techniques on how to read and extrapolate critical information, focusing on reading in the sciences. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
    September 20, 2011
    This informational session is for those either interested in or already enrolled in the Graduate Teaching Certificate Program for GTAs and post-docs. The workshop will provide an overview of the certificate and we'll talk about e-portfolio organization and audience issues with regard to the writing of the teaching philosophy and other reflective documents.
    September 20, 2011 - September 22, 2011
    See the link below for the Conference Program and schedule of events. The conference begins at 9:00 Tuesday, September 20th and continues through Thursday, Sept 22. See the schedule for presentations throughout the week. The keynote address will be at 7:00 P.M in the Main Ballroom of Lory Student Center.
    September 19, 2011
    Are you overwhelmed by the amount of reading you must do for each of your classes? Do you feel like you read things over and over but don’t really take anything away? From textbooks to scholarly articles, this workshop will provide tips and techniques on how to read and extrapolate critical information. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
    September 17, 2011 - September 18, 2011
    Come enjoy lovely fall colors in the high country! Help restore and protect alpine and subalpine habitat near Kingston Peak, south of Nederland and the James Peak Wilderness, along the popular Apex Road. The area has spectacular views of the Continental Divide. Several subalpine sites have been impacted by motorized recreation along unofficial roadways, forming erosion gullies in this sensitive environment. Plus, a rare alpine wetland has been impacted and needs to be protected and restored. Volunteers, working at elevations over 11,000 feet, will plant seeds, transplant vegetation, install erosion matting, construct drainage structures and a buck'n'rail fence. Volunteers will camp in a lovely forested area a few miles from the site, then carpool and hike each day to enjoy this late summer adventure in the high country. Friday night arrival highly recommended. Rain backup date is October 8-9.
    September 15, 2011
    For students: learn how to maximize your ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
    September 15, 2011
    Lunch will be served. Space is limited! Please RSVP to: Annie Bilyeu, Annie.Biyeu@colostate.edu and let her know your preference (vegetarian/carnivore/opportunivore)
    September 13, 2011
    For students: learn how to maximize your ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
    September 13, 2011
    Speakers: Kate Browne, Dept. of Anthropology, Cate DiCeasare, Dept. of Art, Greg Dickinson, Dept. of Communication Studies Please join us for an engaging conversation about teaching and learning with three recipients of the 2011 Best Teacher Award--All from the College of Liberal Arts. For more information about our speakers, please visit http://www.today.colostate.edu/story.aspx?id=5386 If you are able to attend, please RSVP to Shirley Guitron in the TILT office by 5:00 PM on Tuesday, Spet. 6 (401)3132; shirley.guitron@colostate.edu. Give Shirley the following information: 1. Let her know you are registering for the College of LIberal Arts Master Teacher Initiative Luncheon; and 2) Let her know if you would like a vegetarian lunch option.
    September 12, 2011
    For students: learn how to maximize your ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
    September 8, 2011
    In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material.
    September 7, 2011
    Dr. Green will explain to us CSU's new Honor Code and what we, as faculty, can do to meet our requirements. As usual,lunch will be provided. If you plan on attending please RSVP to Joanne Greer, from the Dean's Office by Sept. 2, so that she can order the correct number of lunches; also please let her know if you need a vegetarian lunch option. and if you are a graduate student.
    September 6, 2011
    In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material.
    September 6, 2011
    What does being a critical thinker have to do with success in college, and beyond? In this four-week introduction to critical thinking, you will explore with a group of other students what your professors mean when they ask you to think critically. You'll meet with a small cohort of students once a week for four weeks (Tuesdays, 8/30-9/20), and discuss what it means to move from being a consumer of information to a producer of knowledge. You will also come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world. What happens during these workshops? Each Session is comprised of four discussion-based workshops on the following topics: •Workshop 1: Critical Thinking, Academic Success, and ACTing in the World •Workshop 2: Learning How to Learn •Workshop 3: Skilled Analysis and Effective Evaluation •Workshop 4: Finding Your Voice and ACTing up. At the end of the four workshops, you will receive a Certificate from TILT's Academy for Critical Thinking. Pre-registration required. To register, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
    September 1, 2011
    This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
    August 30, 2011
    This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
    August 30, 2011
    What does being a critical thinker have to do with success in college, and beyond? In this four-week introduction to critical thinking, you will explore with a group of other students what your professors mean when they ask you to think critically. You'll meet with a small cohort of students once a week for four weeks (Tuesdays, 8/30-9/20), and discuss what it means to move from being a consumer of information to a producer of knowledge. You will also come to understand why critical thinking—the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information—is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world. What happens during these workshops? Each Session is comprised of four discussion-based workshops on the following topics: •Workshop 1: Critical Thinking, Academic Success, and ACTing in the World •Workshop 2: Learning How to Learn •Workshop 3: Skilled Analysis and Effective Evaluation •Workshop 4: Finding Your Voice and ACTing up. At the end of the four workshops, you will receive a Certificate from TILT's Academy for Critical Thinking. Pre-registration required. To register, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
    August 29, 2011
    This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
    August 9, 2011

    Teaching Integrity: Effective Responses to Cheating (webinar and "brown bag" lunch)

    It could be a paper downloaded from the Web, roving eyes during an exam or the fifth student to lose a grandparent in one week … Whether you teach at a public or private institution, you’re bound to run into academic dishonesty sooner or later. So how can we respond to it effectively, or even prevent it in the first place?

    Learn a proactive approach to dealing with cheating in Teaching Integrity: Effective Responses to Cheating. During this seminar Dr. Tricia Bertram Gallant will review the common myths and misunderstandings about student cheating that limit your ability to respond effectively to the problem, and teach you a way forward based on teaching.

    You’ll learn how to stop ignoring cheating, due to concerns about policing and bureaucratic entanglements, and start focusing on your critical role teaching tomorrow’s professionals about integrity and ethics.

    Teaching Integrity: Effective Responses to Cheating will help you change your perspective and practice to promote student integrity, and show you how a positive approach can prevent negative consequences.

    You’ll learn different ways to think about cheating, such as:

  • Switching from a “crime and punishment” approach to emphasizing teaching and learning
  • Examining your teaching to see if it encourages or facilitates cheating
  • Identifying your typical response to cheating.
  • You’ll come away with techniques you can implement right away, including:

  • New teaching strategies to encourage academic integrity and reduce cheating
  • New responses to cheating designed to create opportunities for student learning
  • Behavior you can model to demonstrate academic integrity in action.
  • An Active Approach to Teaching Academic Integrity: Bertram Gallant favors an energetic, conversational style in her presentations and there will be plenty of opportunities for you to get actively involved in this audio online seminar. The 90 minutes of this session will be divided evenly between lecture, learning activities and a Q&A session.

    You’ll take home materials you can use to start teaching academic integrity right away, such as questions for self-assessment, do’s and don’ts and blank versions of worksheets you can adapt to your situation.

    May 18, 2011
    This year's summer workshop will focus on "using integrative learning to enhance critical thinking in your courses." The workshop is intended for members of the CSU community who are primary or co-instructors in a course. Participants may check in and pick up workshop materials beginning at 8:30 am. The workshop begins at 9:00 am and will continue until 3:00 pm. This workshop is limited to 40 participants and registration is required.
    May 5, 2011
    For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests - midterms! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
    May 4, 2011
    Whether your course is entirely online or a hybrid of face-to-face instruction along with online components, engagement in the course is crucial to student learning. This short course offers tools for engaging students.
    May 3, 2011
    For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests - midterms! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
    May 2, 2011
    For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests - midterms! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
    May 2, 2011
    This 4-part course examines the collaboration process and specifically how social-media tools can be used to build social presence and a community through which learning happens. The exploration will focus on social-media based learning activities that cannot be done in isolation. Challenges to collaborative learning along with suggestions for intervention will be addressed.
    April 29, 2011
    Plagued by Test Anxiety? Performance Anxiety? Learn EFT. • Butterflies or knots in your stomach? • Sweaty palms? • Difficulty concentrating • Loss of appetite or emotional overeating? • Blanking out • Dizziness • Loss of confidence • Sleeping problems • Difficulty breathing • Negative thinking resulting lower self confidence Do these issues sound familiar? Learn a fast, effective therapeutic tool that addresses your own particular situation--including performance issues, such as test anxiety. EFT is an age old technique based on acupuncture points BUT with no needles! EFT addresses the physical, cognitive and emotional aspects of the problem. If you really want to conquer test anxiety, this may be your answer.
    April 29, 2011
    Free Catered luncheon discussion on developing online courses for distance education purposes.

    RSVP: Please email Ken Barbarick by April 22nd. Seating is limited to 25.
    April 28, 2011
    This series helps to meet the TILT Teaching Certificate. This workshop series,which supports the gtPathways writing integration, recent graduates of E608, Integrating Writing into the Core, will present with Sue Doe their strategies for assisting with Student Writing. Faculty and Graduate Students are welcome to attend. Please register so that we know to expect you! To register, please go to http://writing.colostate.edu/gtpathways/workshops/index
    April 27, 2011
    Whether your course is entirely online or a hybrid of face-to-face instruction along with online components, engagement in the course is crucial to student learning. This short course offers tools for engaging students.
    April 25, 2011
    As the demographics of the campus community continue to grow and change, classroom management becomes more challenging. The CSU Campus Climate survey indicates students of color; gay, lesbian, and bisexual students; transgender students; students with disabilities; and non-traditionally aged students feel isolated and marginalized on the CSU campus. While most people do not intend to marginalize students, a few toxic students can negatively influence the classroom climate. This short course will explore creating inclusive environments and addressing toxic students.
    April 21, 2011
    For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
    April 21, 2011
    In this forum, faculty members will work in small groups facilitated by Center for Public Deliberation (CPD) student associates to discuss a variety of topics related to student-faculty reciprocity and improving the classroom experience. The forum will build on work begun by the CPD during the past few years engaging students in similar issues.

    The overall goal for the broader project is to explore mutual expectations for teachers and students and what sort of changes both should consider to continuously adapt and improve the classroom experience. Information from this event will be compiled and put into a report which will be made available to participants and used by the CPD to continue the conversation between students and faculty.
    April 21, 2011
    Free Catered luncheon discussion on the topic of assistive technology.

    RSVP: Registration details coming soon. Stay tuned!
    April 20, 2011
    Whether your course is entirely online or a hybrid of face-to-face instruction along with online components, engagement in the course is crucial to student learning. This short course offers tools for engaging students.
    April 20, 2011
    Free Catered luncheon discussion Echo 360, Web X Media Site, Skype, etc. as Instructional Tools.

    RSVP: Please email Rod Lucero by April 18th.
    April 20, 2011
    Free Catered luncheon. If you have ever contemplated writing a textbook or are curious about the textbook publishing business, this Master Teacher Workshop is for you! A seasoned (polite term) panel of textbook authors will field questions from participants.

    RSVP: Please email Doug Hoffman
    April 20, 2011
    Free Catered Luncheon and presentation on promoting academic integrity

    RSVP: Please email Kelly Kimple in the College of Natural Sciences main office 2 weeks in advance (Feb 26).
    April 19, 2011
    For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
    April 18, 2011
    For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
    April 18, 2011
    This series helps to meet the TILT Teaching Certificate. This workshop series,which supports the gtPathways writing integration, recent graduates of E608, Integrating Writing into the Core, will present with Sue Doe their strategies for assisting with Student Writing. Faculty and Graduate Students are welcome to attend. Please register so that we know to expect you! To register, please go to http://writing.colostate.edu/gtpathways/workshops/index
    April 15, 2011
    This series helps to meet the TILT Teaching Certificate. This workshop series,which supports the gtPathways writing integration, recent graduates of E608, Integrating Writing into the Core, will present with Sue Doe their strategies for assisting with Student Writing. Faculty and Graduate Students are welcome to attend. Please register so that we know to expect you! To register, please go to http://writing.colostate.edu/gtpathways/workshops/index.
    April 14, 2011
    This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
    April 12, 2011
    This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
    April 11, 2011
    As the demographics of the campus community continue to grow and change, classroom management becomes more challenging. The CSU Campus Climate survey indicates students of color; gay, lesbian, and bisexual students; transgender students; students with disabilities; and non-traditionally aged students feel isolated and marginalized on the CSU campus. While most people do not intend to marginalize students, a few toxic students can negatively influence the classroom climate. This short course will explore creating inclusive environments and addressing toxic students.
    April 11, 2011
    This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
    April 11, 2011
    This 4-part course examines the collaboration process and specifically how social-media tools can be used to build social presence and a community through which learning happens. The exploration will focus on social-media based learning activities that cannot be done in isolation. Challenges to collaborative learning along with suggestions for intervention will be addressed.
    April 7, 2011
    Pinpoint your academic problem areas and make a plan to recover your semester. Learn to track your grades and figure out your potential GPA.
    April 6, 2011 - April 27, 2011
    For information about the Academy, and to enroll, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
    April 6, 2011
    Whether your course is entirely online or a hybrid of face-to-face instruction along with online components, engagement in the course is crucial to student learning. This short course offers tools for engaging students.
    April 5, 2011
    Pinpoint your academic problem areas and make a plan to recover your semester. Learn to track your grades and figure out your potential GPA.
    April 5, 2011 - April 26, 2011
    For information about the Academy, and to enroll, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
    April 5, 2011
    This series helps to meet the TILT Teaching Certificate. This workshop series,which supports the gtPathways writing integration, recent graduates of E608, Integrating Writing into the Core, will present with Sue Doe their strategies for assisting with Student Writing. Faculty and Graduate Students are welcome to attend. Please register so that we know to expect you! To register, please go to http://writing.colostate.edu/gtpathways/workshops/index
    April 5, 2011
    Free Catered luncheon discussion. Recent criticisms of higher education in the United States have raised concerns regarding the quality of learning, implicating both students and faculty in important ways. Many students complain about their professors, and vice versa, but productive interactions between these groups concerning the classroom experience are rare. The notion of student-faculty reciprocity focuses on the idea that if students and faculty collaborated more about the classroom experience, mutual adjustments could be identified that would positively impact the quality of learning.

    This session will introduce the CSU Center for Public Deliberation and review its past work which engaged students to identify what has worked well in classrooms and what improvements they suggest. We will then engage participants in an initial opportunity to assess their views of the classroom experience and student/faculty responsibilities from their faculty perspective. This session will preview a longer MTI/CPD joint forum on April 21 that will allow faculty to work in small groups with CPD student associates in exploring these issues in greater detail.

    RSVP: Please email or call Shirley Guitron, 491-3132, in the TILT office by 5:00 P.M., Tuesday, March 15, 2011.

    Note: Please let Shirley know that you are registering for the College of Liberal Arts MTI Luncheon and whether you have a vegetarian meal preference or not.
    April 4, 2011 - April 25, 2011
    For information about the Academy, and to enroll, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
    April 4, 2011
    Pinpoint your academic problem areas and make a plan to recover your semester. Learn to track your grades and figure out your potential GPA.
    April 4, 2011
    As the demographics of the campus community continue to grow and change, classroom management becomes more challenging. The CSU Campus Climate survey indicates students of color; gay, lesbian, and bisexual students; transgender students; students with disabilities; and non-traditionally aged students feel isolated and marginalized on the CSU campus. While most people do not intend to marginalize students, a few toxic students can negatively influence the classroom climate. This short course will explore creating inclusive environments and addressing toxic students.
    March 31, 2011
    "Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning.
    March 31, 2011
    This workshop will address the requirement for writing a teaching philosophy. Please read the section on Writing a Philosophy of Teaching on the TILT website. Come prepared to generate ideas for writing your philosophy and engaging in a peer review session. General questions about the e-portfolio will also be answered.
    March 30, 2011
    Free Catered luncheon discussion on the use of smartboards.

    RSVP: Please email Rod Lucero by March 28th.
    March 29, 2011
    "Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning.
    March 28, 2011
    "Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning.
    March 28, 2011
    This series helps to meet the TILT Teaching Certificate. This workshop series,which supports the gtPathways writing integration, recent graduates of E608, Integrating Writing into the Core, will present with Sue Doe their strategies for assisting with Student Writing. Faculty and Graduate Students are welcome to attend. Please register so that we know to expect you! To register, please go to http://writing.colostate.edu/gtpathways/workshops/index
    March 24, 2011
    Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
    March 23, 2011

    Dr. Temple Grandin's "Favorite Lecture" centers on animal behavior, visual thinking, and autism. She will discuss how—by thinking in pictures rather than in language—her visual mind allows her to understand animal behavior in ways that others cannot.

    An outspoken advocate for autistic people, Dr. Grandin will identify several types of "unique minds" found in the autism spectrum and explore how the complex challenges of the future can be better addressed by engaging those same "minds" in the search for solutions.

    March 23, 2011
    Cross-cultural, interpersonal and analytical skills must come together to create success in the intercultural realm, whether teaching about international and cultural issues in classes, working with colleagues and students from other cultures, or in working and doing research abroad. This 3-part short course is designed to provide tools to assist you.
    March 22, 2011
    Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
    March 22, 2011
    Dr. Wueste is Director, Robert J. Rutland Institute for Ethics, Clemson University. Please join us as we welcome Dr. Wueste as the keymote speaker for the Ethics Infusion Program, a train-the-trainers workshop designed for faculty and staff on how to incorporate ethics training into coursework and the campus community. The event is sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the Office of the Vice President for Research. All are welcomed. No cost to attend. Refreshments.
    March 22, 2011
    Free Catered luncheon discussion on the topic of disruptive classroom behaviors.

    RSVP: Please register and select your choice of lunch at SurveyMonkey by….
    March 22, 2011
    Free Catered Luncheon discussion, led by former TILT Teaching Fellow, Gamze Cavdar, will highlight the outcomes of a course redesign project that used i-clicker technology to increase student engagement.

    RSVP: Please email or call Shirley Guitron, 491-3132, in the TILT office by 5:00 P.M., Tuesday, March 15, 2011.

    Note: Please let Shirley know that you are registering for the College of Liberal Arts MTI Luncheon and whether you have a vegetarian meal preference or not.
    March 21, 2011
    Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
    March 21, 2011
    This 4-part course examines the collaboration process and specifically how social-media tools can be used to build social presence and a community through which learning happens. The exploration will focus on social-media based learning activities that cannot be done in isolation. Challenges to collaborative learning along with suggestions for intervention will be addressed.
    March 10, 2011
    This seminar focuses on promoting academic integrity and preventing academic misconduct. Methods for instructors to respond when plagiarism and/or cheating on assignments and exams is suspected will also be covered.
    March 9, 2011
    Designing, developing and teaching an online class can be challenging and requires a unique set of skills, even for the most talented and motivated instructors. How do you keep students engaged in an online environment? What is the best way to build an online community? How do you create meaningful and deep online discussions? These questions and more will be answered in this 4-part short course.
    March 9, 2011
    Cross-cultural, interpersonal and analytical skills must come together to create success in the intercultural realm, whether teaching about international and cultural issues in classes, working with colleagues and students from other cultures, or in working and doing research abroad. This 3-part short course is designed to provide tools to assist you.
    March 8, 2011
    The Sympodium is a touch-screen monitor that makes whiteboards optional. It allows you to write, draw, or highlight during your live class and save the work for future reference. You can also create a complete PDF copy of your notes and presentation with a couple of mouse clicks. This Teaching with Technology Workshop will demonstrate the use and functions of a portable Sympodium.
    March 4, 2011
    Plagued by Test Anxiety? Performance Anxiety? Learn EFT • Butterflies or knots in your stomach? • Sweaty palms? • Difficulty concentrating • Loss of appetite or emotional overeating? • Blanking out • Dizziness • Loss of confidence • Sleeping problems • Difficulty breathing • Negative thinking resulting lower self confidence? EFT is a fast, effective therapeutic tool that addresses your own particular situation--including performance issues, such as test anxiety. EFT is an age old technique based on acupuncture points BUT with no needles! EFT addresses the physical, cognitive and emotional aspects of the problem. If you really want to conquer test anxiety, this may be your answer. No drugs or extended therapy. It is easy, inexpensive and has a high success rate. It is a tool you can use the rest of your life.
    March 3, 2011
    Come watch the winning three videos, and hear from their creators. Winners will be presented with their prizes.
    March 3, 2011
    For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests - midterms! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
    March 3, 2011
    This seminar focuses on promoting academic integrity and preventing academic misconduct. Methods for instructors to respond when plagiarism and/or cheating on assignments and exams is suspected will also be covered.
    March 2, 2011 - March 30, 2011
    For information about the Academy, and to enroll, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
    March 2, 2011
    Designing, developing and teaching an online class can be challenging and requires a unique set of skills, even for the most talented and motivated instructors. How do you keep students engaged in an online environment? What is the best way to build an online community? How do you create meaningful and deep online discussions? These questions and more will be answered in this 4-part short course.
    March 2, 2011
    - Why you should approach your professors - How to approach faculty in different situations
    March 1, 2011
    For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests - midterms! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
    March 1, 2011 - March 29, 2011
    For information about the Academy, and to enroll, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
    February 28, 2011 - March 28, 2011
    For information about the Academy, and to enroll, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
    February 28, 2011
    For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests - midterms! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
    February 28, 2011
    This 4-part course examines the collaboration process and specifically how social-media tools can be used to build social presence and a community through which learning happens. The exploration will focus on social-media based learning activities that cannot be done in isolation. Challenges to collaborative learning along with suggestions for intervention will be addressed.
    February 26, 2011
    Reflections for Youth has set a date for our annual benefit! This year we will host our casino night/silent auction on February 26th, 2011. We are expanding our gaming by adding an additional craps table. We will also be adding to the fun with the addition of a dance floor and live band performing big band/swing 40s era music. If you are interested in volunteering for this event please contact us. We will need volunteers to help with decoration set-up, greeters/vip ushers, photographers,wine pouring,auction monitors, registration, raffle ticket sellers, black jack and poker dealers, and last but not least, clean up. Remember volunteers get to attend for free! We're looking forward to another great event and your wonderful help!
    February 24, 2011
    Learn the process of creating a video from start to finish with an emphasis on producing and story-telling. You will be able to produce, shoot and edit a short video in your area of interest. Examine the difference between producing video for news, sports, entertainment and YouTube. One session will also focus on the business of video production. Pre-requisite: This class is intended for intermediate students; therefore, students should have 1-3 years of shooting, editing and producing experience. Equipment: Final Cut editing equipment provided. Students must provide digital camera equipment. (Students can check digital cameras and tripods out from Morgan Library). There are five 2-hour sessions for this course. Each session is offered Thursdays, February 24-March 31 (excluding Spring Break). Space is limited. RSVP by emailing Heather Landers.
    February 24, 2011
    Learn to identify your own “preferred” learning style, making it easier for you to determine study strategies that work best for you. In doing so, you’ll learn to recognize different teaching styles and how to “flex” your own style to ensure your own learning, no matter how a class is taught.
    February 24, 2011
    This seminar focuses on promoting academic integrity and preventing academic misconduct. Methods for instructors to respond when plagiarism and/or cheating on assignments and exams is suspected will also be covered.
    February 23, 2011
    Toni Schindler Zimmerman, Ph.D, will take participants on a journey exploring “What’s in Your Backpack?” In this experiential talk, Toni will guide us through "unpacking" the personal privilege that can often be invisible. She will teach participants about first and second thinking as a way of increasing our awareness and our reactions to stereotypes. Toni has published over 80 journal articles and chapters, many of which are on the topic of diversity and gender. Her enthusiastic and knowledgeable teaching style creates a learning environment where students can learn about themselves, each other, and the topic. TILT's My Favorite Lecture series is an opportunity for CSU students to learn from the University's most distinguished professors. There will be a reception prior to the talk in the lobby outside of TILT 221. No RSVP required; however, you may want to arrive early to ensure seating.
    February 23, 2011
    Designing, developing and teaching an online class can be challenging and requires a unique set of skills, even for the most talented and motivated instructors. How do you keep students engaged in an online environment? What is the best way to build an online community? How do you create meaningful and deep online discussions? These questions and more will be answered in this 4-part short course.
    February 23, 2011
    Cross-cultural, interpersonal and analytical skills must come together to create success in the intercultural realm, whether teaching about international and cultural issues in classes, working with colleagues and students from other cultures, or in working and doing research abroad. This 3-part short course is designed to provide tools to assist you.
    February 22, 2011
    Learn to identify your own “preferred” learning style, making it easier for you to determine study strategies that work best for you. In doing so, you’ll learn to recognize different teaching styles and how to “flex” your own style to ensure your own learning, no matter how a class is taught.
    February 21, 2011
    Learn how to create web documents using World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standards. Taught by Ben O’Connor, an instructor in the Journalism & Technical Communication department, who teaches a full-semester course at CSU and does web design professionally. Topics will include: - Basic HTML coding - Effective use of style sheets (CSS) - Appropriate use of images and multimedia - Image preparation - Multimedia elements Note: A basic proficiency with Photoshop required. This workshop is offered Mondays and Wednesdays, February 21-March 2.
    February 21, 2011
    Learn to identify your own “preferred” learning style, making it easier for you to determine study strategies that work best for you. In doing so, you’ll learn to recognize different teaching styles and how to “flex” your own style to ensure your own learning, no matter how a class is taught.
    February 17, 2011
    For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
    February 16, 2011
    Designing, developing and teaching an online class can be challenging and requires a unique set of skills, even for the most talented and motivated instructors. How do you keep students engaged in an online environment? What is the best way to build an online community? How do you create meaningful and deep online discussions? These questions and more will be answered in this 4-part short course.
    February 16, 2011
    Free Catered luncheon discussion on using document and flip cameras as instructional tools.

    RSVP: Please email Rod Lucero by Feb 14th.
    February 15, 2011
    For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
    February 15, 2011
    Prezi is an elegant response to the shortcomings of PowerPoint. It encourages users to build presentations using online content, animations, imagery, and non-linear paths. Its platform directs the user away from the often deadly linear presentations toward zooming contextually-based illustrations. This Teaching with Technology Workshop takes a look at Prezi's basic platform—showing 10 + ways that Prezi encourages us to breathe life back into what we have to say in the classroom and beyond.
    February 14, 2011
    For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
    February 12, 2011
    This free short course offers individualized help in effectively preparing for the MCAT, taught by CSU student and math tutor Kumar Verma. Kumar has successfully prepared for and taken the MCAT recently, and he looks forward to offering other CSU students his insights and study strategies! Note: This is not a content review for the MCAT. For an intensive content review, you may want to sign up for CSU's MCAT Preparation Course. Topics will include: - The structure and timing of the MCAT - How to read problems effectively and analyze passages presented - Using critical thinking skills and apply subject matter to specific situations - Effectively using your time on the test - Reduce mistakes and increase understanding - Overview of the computer-based testing used in the MCAT This course is offered Saturdays, starting January 29, 2011.
    February 11, 2011
    Free Catered Luncheon discussion on integrating critical thinking exercises into a large enrollment course such as Plants and Civilizations

    RSVP: Please email Ken Barbarick by Feb 4th. Seating is limited to 25.
    February 10, 2011
    For students: from textbooks to scholarly articles - tips and techniques on how to read and extrapolate critical information, with specific focus on humanities and liberal arts courses. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
    February 10, 2011
    Free Catered luncheon discussion. Join us for a fun, interactive, and insightful look at in-class behavior.

    RSVP: Please email or call Sara Rathburn, 491-6956, by 5:00 P.M., Monday, February 7, 2011.
    February 9, 2011
    Free Catered Luncheon discussion on writing across the curriculum

    RSVP: Please email Kelly Kimple in the College of Natural Sciences main office 2 weeks in advance (Feb 26).
    February 8, 2011
    For students: from textbooks to scholarly articles - tips and techniques on how to read and extrapolate critical information, particularly in science courses. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
    February 8, 2011
    Free Catered Luncheon discussion—led by Natalie Barnes and Sue Doe from the Departments of Art and English respectively—covering three easy and engaging write-to-learn strategies that work in the large classroom.

    Designed to meet the GT Pathways writing requirement, these strategies will help define content, give students practice with the writing process (and they might not even know they’re doing this), and remove the stress that comes with grading yet another essay.

    RSVP: Please email or call Shirley Guitron, 491-3132, in the TILT office by 5:00 P.M., Tuesday, February 1, 2011.

    Note: Please let Shirley know that you are registering for the College of Liberal Arts MTI Luncheon and whether you have a vegetarian meal preference or not.
    February 8, 2011
    Free Catered luncheon discussion on the topic of women and teaching led by Erica Suchman

    RSVP: Please register and select your choice of lunch at SurveyMonkey by Friday, February 4th.
    February 7, 2011
    For students: from textbooks to scholarly articles - tips and techniques on how to read and extrapolate critical information. Save time by learning to be a strategic reader.
    February 3, 2011
    In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material. Learning Outcomes: 1. Learn to take “active” in class notes. 2. Learn the benefits of reviewing notes consistently, rather than saving note review for right before an exam. 3. Learn several specific note-taking strategies that work for different types of courses.
    February 2, 2011 - February 23, 2011
    For more information and to enroll in this co-hort, visit: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
    February 1, 2011
    In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-taking strategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material. Learning Outcomes: 1. Learn to take “active” in class notes. 2. Learn the benefits of reviewing notes consistently, rather than saving note review for right before an exam. 3. Learn several specific note-taking strategies that work for different types of courses.
    January 31, 2011 - February 21, 2011
    See the Academy website for information and to enroll: http://tilt.colostate.edu/learning/ctworkshops/
    January 31, 2011
    In our classes, we often “zone out” and go on automatic pilot – copying down everything our prof is saying, and then never returning to those notes we took again. There are specific note-takingstrategies that can significantly cut down on the amount of time you have to spend studying or seeking information you recorded. This hands-on workshop will give students specific note-taking strategies that will make studying faster and easier, as well as aid in active learning and recall of class material. Learning Outcomes: 1. Learn to take “active” in class notes. 2. Learn the benefits of reviewing notes consistently, rather than saving note review for right before an exam. 3. Learn several specific note-taking strategies that work for different types of courses.
    January 29, 2011
    This free short course offers individualized help in effectively preparing for the MCAT, taught by CSU student and math tutor Kumar Verma. Kumar has successfully prepared for and taken the MCAT recently, and he looks forward to offering other CSU students his insights and study strategies. This workshop will be offered on Saturdays, starting January 29, 2011.
    January 27, 2011
    This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on settingpersonal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will comeaway with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
    January 25, 2011
    This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
    January 24, 2011
    This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
    January 11, 2011
    Learn how to set up i>clicker and start polling your students on the first day of class! During this session, you will learn the simple steps to using your i>clicker system in class, how to give points for questions, and how to export grades into RamCT. Lastly, we will talk about remote registration and discuss ways to use i>clicker to engage students and get them to actively participate.
    January 11, 2011
    During this demonstration, you will learn how i>clicker can significantly change the way you and your students interact by enabling you to assess your students' knowledge, keep their attention, provide immediate feedback, and encourage all students to participate. This session will allow you to better understand how i>clicker enhances the teaching and learning environment.
    December 9, 2010
    Teaching topics related to issues of class, religion, gender, sexuality, race, political orientation, physical ability or national origin can seem like a minefield, especially in a diverse university setting.

    However, the diversity of our student body can be a real asset when beginning open, frank and fruitful discussions about topics like gay marriage, abortion, racial discrimination or foreign policy.

    This presentation will discuss some techniques that can help create a classroom environment where students are comfortable enough to be fully themselves while still being open to learning from others' perspectives.

    RSVP: Please email or call Shirley Guitron, 491-3132, in the TILT office by 5:00 P.M., Thursday, December 2, 2010.

    Note: Please let her know that you are registering for the College of Liberal Arts MTI Luncheon and whether you would like a vegetarian meal.
    December 8, 2010
    For students: come get ready before that last big round of tests - FINALS! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
    December 7, 2010
    For students: come get ready before that last big round of tests - FINALS! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
    December 6, 2010
    For students: come get ready before that last big round of tests - FINALS! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
    December 3, 2010
    Plagued by Test Anxiety? Performance Anxiety? Learn EFT • Butterflies or knots in your stomach? • Sweaty palms? • Difficulty concentrating • Loss of appetite or emotional overeating? • Blanking out • Dizziness • Loss of confidence • Sleeping problems • Difficulty breathing • Negative thinking resulting lower self confidence EFT is a fast, effective therapeutic tool that addresses your own particular situation--including performance issues, such as test anxiety. EFT is an age old technique based on acupuncture points BUT with no needles! EFT addresses the physical, cognitive and emotional aspects of the problem. If you really want to conquer test anxiety, this may be your answer. No drugs or extended therapy. It is easy, inexpensive and has a high success rate. It is a tool you can use the rest of your life.
    December 1, 2010
    For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
    December 1, 2010
    We are always in need of volunteers at ReSource! right here in Fort Collins. We're open Monday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 9am-5pm, and Sunday 11am-4pm. Come by and check it out!
    November 30, 2010
    For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
    November 29, 2010
    For students: learn how to maximize your memory's ability to remember critical information. Learn "tricks" for aiding memory recall--help your brain by using these tried & true strategies. We’ll also discuss ways to improve study quality, rather than quantity, through concentration strategies.
    November 17, 2010
    This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
    November 17, 2010
    Outreach/Education Components of NSF Grants

    Free catered lunch and panel discussion with NSF CAREER award winners in CNS.

    Please RSVP: Kelly Kimple in the College of Natural Sciences main office 2 Weeks in advance.
    November 16, 2010
    This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
    November 15, 2010
    This interactive workshop will give students strategies for time management, with a focus on setting personal priorities and thinking about how to tackle tasks based on larger goals. Students will come away with tools they can use, not only for academic planning, but life, career, and personal planning as well. This workshop is great for the busy student who wants to have it all during their time in college without becoming overwhelmed!
    November 15, 2010
    Steven H. Kraft is a career Foreign Service Officer who joined the Department of State in 1991. He assumed duties as the Director of the Afghanistan/Pakistan Office in the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs in Washington, DC in August 2009. Prior to this assignment, he served as Deputy Chief of Mission (DCM) at the U.S. Embassy Luxembourg in from 2006 to 2009. From October 2003 to July 2006, he served as DCM and Chargé d'Affaires at the U. S. Embassy in Bamako, Mali. Mr. Kraft has also been posted to Azerbaijan, Australia, and Sri Lanka, and served in Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom. Mr. Kraft will be discussing what's going on with the War on Drugs in Afghanistan and Pakistan. This talk is open to the campus and wider community.
    November 12, 2010
    Successful On-Line Discussions

    A free, catered lunchtime presentation and discussion. Seating limited to 25

    Please RSVP: Ken Barbarick by November 8, 2010.
    November 12, 2010
    Supporting Students, Sustaining Ourselves: Balancing the Teacher We Want to Be and the Professional We Need to Be

    As teachers, we want to do all that we can to support our students. This can involve holding additional office hours, as well as mentoring students through papers, theses, and presentations. It can involve providing oral and written words of encouragement.

    Still, there are only so many hours in the day—and so much work to be done. In this session, we will explore ways to balance energy taking and energy giving aspects of teaching.

    Please RSVP: Shirley Guitron,, 491-3132, in the TILT office by 5:00 P.M., November 8, 2010.

    Please let her know you are registering for the College of Liberal Arts Master Teacher Initiative Luncheon and if you would like a vegetarian meal.
    November 11, 2010
    Over the past several years, Brian Jones, instructor of Physics, has tried many different instructional technologies to enhance communication with his students. Some technologies can help or hinder, depending on how they are used. In this Teaching with Technology Workshop, he will share examples and insights gleaned from teaching large lecture classes to a changing population of students.
    November 10, 2010
    "Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning.
    November 10, 2010
    Google Apps, Google Alert Prezi, and iTeach

    A free, catered lunchtime presentation and discussion.

    Please RSVP: Doug Hoffman.
    November 9, 2010
    "Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning.
    November 8, 2010
    "Tell me, and I forget, show me, and I remember; involve me, and I understand." This Chinese proverb captures why so many of us have trouble recalling info from our personal lives, in classes, and at work. This workshop will teach you some strategies for learning actively, which studies show leads to deeper learning.
    November 6, 2010
    Lunch and conversation with Gwen. We want to know what you think about community service in our society. Qyota International of Fort Collins is a service club that was established in 1940.
    November 3, 2010
    Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
    November 2, 2010
    Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
    November 2, 2010
    Digital Technology in the Classroom

    A free, catered lunchtime presentation and discussion on digital technology in the classroom.

    Please RSVP: Amy Hoseth 3 days in advance.
    November 1, 2010
    Does the thought of having to give a presentation totally freak you out? Do you hate talking even in class? This interactive workshop will give you some easy tips to manage your nervousness related to giving a presentation -- as well as ideas for connecting with your audience to make any speech - whether it's for three or 300 people -- a lot easier.
    October 28, 2010
    Professor Schell, author of two books on contingent/adjunct faculty labor, will speak about academic workforce issues, especially the working conditions of non tenure-track faculty.

    Her speech marks the celebration of Campus Equity Week on the CSU campus.

    In addition to her keynote address on October 28, Dr. Schell will also participate in two other events on the CSU campus:

    • an open hearing inviting exchanges among individual contingent/adjunct faculty and a panel on October 28 from 10-12 noon in the Grey Rock Room, Lory Student Center
    • a contingent/adjunct faculty workshop on Friday Oct 29 from 10-11:30 in School of Education, Room 2
    October 27, 2010
    Designing, developing and teaching an online class can be challenging and requires a unique set of skills, even for the most talented and motivated instructors. If you are new to online course design or simply want to learn different online course techniques; this short course is for you.
    October 27, 2010
    Midterms not go as well as you planned? Worried about bringing up your grades for the semester? Let's talk about what how you can change up your study strategies to do better in your classes for the rest of the semester. We'll also talk about tracking your grades and figuring out your potential GPA.
    October 26, 2010
    Midterms not go as well as you planned? Worried about bringing up your grades for the semester? Let's talk about what how you can change up your study strategies to do better in your classes for the rest of the semester. We'll also talk about tracking your grades and figuring out your potential GPA.
    October 26, 2010 - November 2, 2010
    Help get out the vote and reach out to voters for the Colorado Democratic Party!
    October 25, 2010
    Midterms not go as well as you planned? Worried about bringing up your grades for the semester? Let's talk about what how you can change up your study strategies to do better in your classes for the rest of the semester. We'll also talk about tracking your grades and figuring out your potential GPA.
    October 21, 2010
    This Teaching with Technology Workshop will discuss using games of various types—from in-class trivia to Second Life—to create an engaging and self-directed learning environment where students can not only read about a topic but actually experience, interact with, and even build it themselves.
    October 21, 2010
    Does going to graduate school sound appealing, but you’d like to learn more about what it’s like? Come hear from several current graduate students in the sciences & engineering. They will talk about:
    • How they made the decision to attend graduate school
    • Whether they took time off between undergrad and attending grad school
    • What their courses and workloads are like
    • The career path they plan to pursue with their graduate degrees
    Bring any questions you have about grad school!
    October 20, 2010
    I’ve been teaching for over 20 years, and I am passionate about everything I teach. So why is this my favorite lecture? Simple: It’s got everything.

    It’s got arcs, stories with a curving trajectory, stories that lead from a casual observation made during a physics lecture to the first modern instance of unification in physical theory, that run from Edison’s development of the light bulb to his electrocution of an elephant on Coney Island. It’s got sparks, the sparks of a struggle between outsize personalities, but also the literal kind, thunderous electric discharges that split the air. And it’s got magic, phenomena that nearly defy belief, that fill us with wonder. Electricity flowing through your body, electricity moving through the air.

    It’s a lecture about electricity and magnetism and how they relate to our lives, how small discoveries led to big inventions, how big inventions led to new technologies and how, sometimes, even scientists aren’t above presenting their craft as possessing a certain magic.

    Get a seat down front, and be part of a circuit that starts with a million volt Tesla coil and ends in a light bulb held in your hand.

    Brian Jones is a popular instructor in the Physics Department at Colorado State University, and is the director the Little Shop of Physics, the Department’s engaging and effective hands-on science outreach program. Brian is also the host of the Everyday Science television program on Poudre School District Channel 10. Brian’s interest in science is wide-ranging, but his professional work is centered on studying how people learn and think, and on devising techniques to make instruction at all levels more effective.

    Brian shares his interest in and knowledge of science with a broad audience, from college students to preschoolers, in venues ranging from lecture halls at Colorado State to street corners in Slovenia, and refuses to accept the notion that there are people who can’t learn, understand and appreciate science.
    October 20, 2010
    Designing, developing and teaching an online class can be challenging and requires a unique set of skills, even for the most talented and motivated instructors. If you are new to online course design or simply want to learn different online course techniques; this short course is for you.
    October 20, 2010
    Managing the Large Classroom

    Free catered luncheon and panel discussion on managing large classrooms.

    Please RSVP: Kelly Kimple in the College of Natural Sciences main office 2 Weeks in advance.
    October 19, 2010 - November 4, 2010
    What does being a critical thinker have to do with success in college, and beyond? In this three-week introduction to critical thinking, you will explore with a group of other students what your professors mean when they ask you to think critically. You'll meet with a small cohort of students twice a week for three weeks, and discuss what it means to move from being a consumer of information to a producer of knowledge. Throughout the course of these workshops, you will learn to analyze and evaluate issues through the context of debates and discussions of current events taken from diverse viewpoints. Through this process, you'll come to understand why critical thinking -- the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information -- is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world. At the end of the three week session, you will receive a Certificate from TILT's Academy of Critical Thinking. This session will meet on Tuesdays & Thursdays.
    October 19, 2010
    Does going to graduate school sound appealing, but you’d like to learn more about what it’s like? Come hear from several current graduate students in social sciences (education, sociology, anthropology, nutrition, and more). They will talk about:
    • How they made the decision to attend graduate school
    • Whether they took time off between undergrad and attending grad school
    • What their courses and workloads are like
    • The career path they plan to pursue with their graduate degrees
    Bring any questions you have about grad school!
    October 18, 2010
    Does going to graduate school sound appealing, but you’d like to learn more about what it’s like? Come hear from several current graduate students in humanities-related fields. They will talk about:
    • How they made the decision to attend graduate school
    • Whether they took time off between undergrad and attending grad school
    • What their courses and workloads are like
    • The career path they plan to pursue with their graduate degrees
    Bring any questions you have about grad school!
    October 18, 2010 - November 3, 2010
    What does being a critical thinker have to do with success in college, and beyond? In this three-week introduction to critical thinking, you will explore with a group of other students what your professors mean when they ask you to think critically. You'll meet with a small cohort of students twice a week for three weeks, and discuss what it means to move from being a consumer of information to a producer of knowledge. Throughout the course of these workshops, you will learn to analyze and evaluate issues through the context of debates and discussions of current events taken from diverse viewpoints. Through this process, you'll come to understand why critical thinking -- the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information -- is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a big impact on your world. At the end of the three week session, you will receive a Certificate from TILT's Academy of Critical Thinking. This session will meet on Mondays & Wednesdays.
    October 13, 2010
    Designing, developing and teaching an online class can be challenging and requires a unique set of skills, even for the most talented and motivated instructors. If you are new to online course design or simply want to learn different online course techniques; this short course is for you.
    October 13, 2010
    Cross-cultural, interpersonal and analytical skills must come together to create success in the intercultural realm, whether teaching about international and cultural issues in classes, working with colleagues and students from other cultures, or in working and doing research abroad. This short course is designed to provide tools to assist you.
    October 13, 2010
    Firehoze: A New Online Tool for Posting Teaching Animations and short video tutorials.

    Firehoze is a website that provides short online video tutorials for specific math and science concepts for college students. Not a lecture, Firehoze videos cover only single concepts so students quickly get the targeted help they need.

    Christina will explain how Firehoze works, how it can be used to augment teaching in your classes, and how you or your teaching assistants can create tutorials that your students can access when they need them. These videos are free to student in your course, and available for a small fee to students from other universities, of which 50% goes to the educator.

    If you are a teaching assistant and are interested in building an online portfolio Firehoze is always looking for new instructors. To learn more about how to contribute new content, please visit Firehoze.com.

    Please RSVP: Erica Suchman 3 days in advance.
    October 12, 2010
    Google Scholar: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    A free, catered lunchtime presentation and discussion on the good, the bad and the ugly regarding Google Scholar.

    Please RSVP: Amy Hoseth 3 days in advance.
    October 12, 2010
    Student Advising and Retention

    Free catered luncheon and presentation on advising and retaining students.

    Please RSVP: Sara Rathburn by Oct. 8th to be included in the Food Head Count.
    October 7, 2010
    For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests - midterms! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
    October 6, 2010
    Designing, developing and teaching an online class can be challenging and requires a unique set of skills, even for the most talented and motivated instructors. If you are new to online course design or simply want to learn different online course techniques; this short course is for you.
    October 6, 2010
    For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests - midterms! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
    October 6, 2010
    Plagued by Test Anxiety? Performance Anxiety? Learn EFT • Butterflies or knots in your stomach? • Sweaty palms? • Difficulty concentrating • Loss of appetite or emotional overeating? • Blanking out • Dizziness • Loss of confidence • Sleeping problems • Difficulty breathing • Negative thinking resulting lower self confidence EFT is a fast, effective therapeutic tool that addresses your own particular situation--including performance issues, such as test anxiety. EFT is an age old technique based on acupuncture points BUT with no needles! EFT addresses the physical, cognitive and emotional aspects of the problem. If you really want to conquer test anxiety, this may be your answer. No drugs or extended therapy. It is easy, inexpensive and has a high success rate. It is a tool you can use the rest of your life.
    October 6, 2010
    Plagued by Test Anxiety? Performance Anxiety? Learn EFT • Butterflies or knots in your stomach? • Sweaty palms? • Difficulty concentrating • Loss of appetite or emotional overeating? • Blanking out • Dizziness • Loss of confidence • Sleeping problems • Difficulty breathing • Negative thinking resulting lower self confidence Do these issues sound familiar? Learn a fast, effective therapeutic tool that addresses your own particular situation--including performance issues, such as test anxiety. EFT is an age old technique based on acupuncture points BUT with no needles! EFT addresses the physical, cognitive and emotional aspects of the problem. If you really want to conquer test anxiety, this may be your answer.
    October 6, 2010
    Avoiding the PowerNap

    A free, catered lunchtime presentation and discussion on strategies for using PowerPoint for active learning and how to avoid the PowerNap.

    Please RSVP: Doug Hoffman 3 days in advance.
    October 5, 2010
    One-stop resource stop for students. Do you want to turn your semester around--or make the Dean's List? Come meet with 45 representatives from different offices and departments on campus to get the help you need all in one place!
    October 4, 2010
    For students: come get ready before that first big round of tests - midterms! Learn tips and strategies for doing your best on exams. We'll cover all types of exam formats: multiple choice, t/f, short answer, and essay. We'll give you preparation tips as well as strategies for test day that will help ease test anxiety and allow you to do your best!
    September 30, 2010
    The objective of this short course is to enhance your performance documentation of teaching and advising. It is designed to not only provide you with information regarding dossier development, but will provide for you the time, space, and support you need to begin developing your own professional teaching dossier.
    September 29, 2010
    Mentor and Mentee-Working Together for Success. In this training, we will discuss the benefits of having a mentor in graduate school. Topics will include: What is a Mentor?; How do I find a Mentor?; What are the Benefits?; Responsibilities of the Mentor; Responsibilities of the Mentee; and Situations to Discuss with your Mentor. This workshop is specifically for graduate students. Presented by CSU's Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO)
    September 29, 2010
    Learn to identify your own “preferred” learning style, making it easier for you to determine study strategies that work best for you. In doing so, you’ll learn to recognize different teaching styles and how to “flex” your own style to ensure your own learning, no matter how a class is taught.
    September 29, 2010
    Free catered luncheon and presentation on Academic Integrity and Academic Dishonesty. This is a "hot topic" across campus and many have requested that it be addressed in an MTI Luncheon.
    September 28, 2010 - October 14, 2010
    What does being a critical thinker have to do with success in college, and beyond? In this three-week introduction to critical thinking, you will explore with a group of other students what your professors mean when they ask you to think critically. You'll meet with a small cohort of students twice a week for three weeks, and discuss what it means to move from being a consumer of information to a producer of knowledge. Throughout the course of these workshops, you will learn to analyze and evaluate issues through the context of debates and discussions of current events taken from diverse viewpoints. Through this process, you'll come to understand why critical thinking -- the way you ask questions, your ability to view and analyze situations from multiple angles, and to seek quality information -- is key to being a better student, creative thinker, and innovator who can have a b